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  1.  1
    “[S]Tupor Non Meno”: What Virgil Saw.Kathryn E. Davis - 2022 - Renascence 74 (1):3-21.
    Dante’s Virgil is, according to Virgil, among the most hopeless souls in the Commedia. As he tells us himself, he and the other virtuous pagans in Limbo who lack baptism yet have not sinned live “sanza speme... in disio”. Virgil believes himself to be eternally damned, and he seems to have convinced everyone from Dante the pilgrim to Cato to Statius to almost all readers of Dante’s poem that he is right. This essay, however, will challenge the assumption that we (...)
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  2. Theater as Vision in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.Stephen Mead - 2022 - Renascence 74 (1):23-44.
    By his transformation and suggestive associations of the Christian and Pagan sources and influences in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Shakespeare both revivifies the social message of Paul’s epistle to the Corinthians for his own age and creates a transformative theatre that closely aligns the “magic” of theatrical performance with the spiritual tenets of Christian salvation and community.
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    Touching Him”: The Doubting Thomas Subtext in M. R. James’s “Oh, Whistle, and I’Ll Come to You, My Lad.Terry W. Thompson - 2022 - Renascence 74 (1):45-58.
    Born the son of an Evangelical Anglican minister, Montague Rhodes James, "Monty" to family and friends, was arguably the best educated ghost story writer who ever lived: "He had all sorts of letters after his name." His tales, collected in four slim volumes, often touch upon, lightly for the most part, biblical motifs or themes. In his most celebrated horror tale, "Oh, Whistle, and I'll Come to You, My Lad," James alludes—subtly as was his wont—to the story of Thomas, the (...)
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