Donkey Demonstratives

Natural Language Semantics 10 (4):285-298 (2002)
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Abstract

Donkey pronouns (e.g., it in Every farmer who owns a donkey beats it) are argued to have an interpretation more similar to a demonstrative phrase (e.g., . . . beats that donkey) than to any of the other alternatives generally considered (e.g., . . . the donkey(s) he owns, . . . a donkey he owns). Like the demonstrative phrase, the pronoun is not equivalent to Evans' E-type paraphrase, nor to either the weak or the strong reading sometimes claimed for donkey sentences. A consequence is to narrow the range of formal analyses

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Barbara Abbott
Michigan State University

Citations of this work

Semantics with Assignment Variables.Alex Silk - 2021 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Pronouns as Demonstratives.Kyle Blumberg - 2021 - Philosophers' Imprint 21 (35).

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References found in this work

Reference and Definite Descriptions.Keith S. Donnellan - 1966 - Philosophical Review 75 (3):281-304.
Descriptions.Stephen Neale - 1990 - MIT Press.
E-Type Pronouns and Donkey Anaphora.Irene Heim - 1990 - Linguistics and Philosophy 13 (2):137--77.

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