Schizophrenia is a disease of general connectivity more than a specifically “social brain” network

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):856-856 (2004)
Abstract
Dysfunctions of the neural circuits that implement social behavior are necessary but not a sufficient condition to develop schizophrenia. We propose that schizophrenia represents a disease of general connectivity that impairs not only the “social brain” networks, but also different neural circuits related with higher cognitive and perceptual functions. We discuss possible mechanisms and evolutionary considerations.
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DOI 10.1017/S0140525X04230199
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