The Dirt on Coming Clean

International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:81-99 (2007)
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Abstract

Conflicts of interest can lead experts to give biased and corrupt advice. Although disclosure is often proposed as a potential solution to these problems, we show that it can have perverse effects. First, people generally do not discount advice from biased advisors as much as they should, even when advisors’ conflicts of interest are disclosed. Second, disclosure can increase the bias in advice because it leads advisors to feel morally licensed and strategically encouraged to exaggerate their advice even further. As a result, disclosure may fail to solve the problems created by conflicts of interest and may sometimes even make matters worse.

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The Dirt on Coming Clean.Daylian M. Cain, George Loewenstein & Don A. Moore - 2007 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:81-99.
Essays on Conflicts of Interest in Medicine.Sunita Sah - 2013 - Business and Society 52 (4):666-678.

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Citations of this work

Objectivity for the research worker.Noah van Dongen & Michał Sikorski - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 11 (3):1-25.
Economists as experts: Overconfidence in theory and practice.Erik Angner - 2006 - Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (1):1-24.
What’s Wrong with Executive Compensation?Jared D. Harris - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):147-156.

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