Handguns, Moral Rights, and Physical Security

Abstract
_ Source: _Page Count 21 Guns occupy a major—sometimes terrible—place in contemporary American life. Do Americans have not only a legal right, but also a moral right, to own handguns? After introducing the topic, this paper examines what a moral right to private handgun ownership would amount to. It then elucidates the logical structure of the strongest argument in favor of such a right, an argument that appeals to physical security, before assessing its cogency and identifying two questionable assumptions. In light of persisting reasonable disagreement about the argument’s soundness, the paper identifies two gun control measures—demonstrated need for a gun as a condition of eligibility and the requirement to pass a rigorous gun safety course—that reasonable disputants on both sides of the issue have principled reasons to accept. The paper also advances the thesis that, if anyone has an undefeated moral right to own handguns, it is precisely those individuals who have a special need and demonstrate the relevant safety-related competence
Keywords moral rights   applied ethics   physical security   guns
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1163/17455243-4681055
Options
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Revision history
Request removal from index
Download options
Our Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 28,106
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library
References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles
Handguns, Moral Rights, and Physical Security.David DeGrazia - 2014 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (1):56-76.
Security, Knowledge and Well-Being.Stephen John - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (1):68-91.
Online Security: What's in a Name? [REVIEW]Anat Biletzki - 2013 - Philosophy and Technology 26 (4):397-410.
Handguns, Philosophers, and the Right to Self-Defense.Nicholas Dixon - 2011 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):151-170.
Toward a Coherent Theory of Moral Rights.Derrick Lamont Darby - 1996 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
Collective Rights and Minority Rights.Seumas Miller - 2000 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (2):241-257.
Human Rights and Human Well-Being.W. J. Talbott - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
Handguns, Violent Crime, and Self-Defense.Nicholas Dixon - 1999 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (2):239-260.
Defending the Right To Do Wrong.Ori J. Herstein - 2012 - Law and Philosophy 31 (3):343-365.
Printing Insecurity? The Security Implications of 3D-Printing of Weapons.Gerald Walther - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (6):1435-1445.
Corporations, Rights, and Lobbying.Quentin Gee - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (2):397-408.

Monthly downloads

Added to index

2015-10-21

Total downloads

10 ( #432,957 of 2,171,776 )

Recent downloads (6 months)

1 ( #326,702 of 2,171,776 )

How can I increase my downloads?

My notes
Sign in to use this feature


Discussion
Order:
There  are no threads in this forum
Nothing in this forum yet.

Other forums