Shakespeare as a method. Carl Schmitt’s reading of Othello and Hamlet

History of European Ideas 45 (7):1058-1071 (2019)

Abstract
ABSTRACTWhile in the 1960s Allan Bloom suggested to read William Shakespeare’s works through the prism of political philosophy, a decade earlier Carl Schmitt used the works of English poet in a reverse way: he read political philosophy and history through Shakespeare. Deprived – under the influence of Leo Strauss – from the possibility of considering Thomas Hobbes a decisionist thinker, Schmitt in his ‘Hamlet or Hecuba’ used Shakespeare’s most famous work to interpret origins of disappearance of the state of emergency from English soil. Shakespeare was seen by Schmitt as a writer who captured the Sixteenth and seventeenth century changes in thinking about sovereignty and the state. Interestingly, Schmitt did not use Shakespeare as method for the first time: in first decades of twentieth century, in his diary, he made ‘Othello’ a prism through which he read his love life. Because the author of ‘The Concept of the Political’ is one of the less methodologically cohesive writers of twentieth century, his usage of Shakespeare twice, in different circumstances, is interesting. In an article, author links ‘Hamlet or Hecuba’ with Schmitt’s geopolitical works and presents Shakespeare’s works as the coherent method of interpretation in Schmitt’s philosophy of decisionism.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
ISBN(s)
DOI 10.1080/01916599.2019.1637359
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

Our Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 45,629
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Truth and Method.Hans-Georg Gadamer, Garrett Barden, John Cumming & David E. Linge - 1977 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (1):67-72.
Myth or Knowledge? Reading Carl Schmitt's Hamlet or Hecuba.Carsten Strathausen - 2010 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (153):7-29.
Shakespeare's Politics.Allan Bloom & Harry V. Jaffa - 1964 - Science and Society 29 (2):244-246.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Myth or Knowledge? Reading Carl Schmitt's Hamlet or Hecuba.Carsten Strathausen - 2010 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (153):7-29.
Steward of the Dying Voice: The Intrusion of Horatio Into Sovereignty and Representation.Timothy Wong - 2010 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (153):113-131.
Carl Schmitt on Culture and Violence in the Political Decision.David Pan - 2008 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2008 (142):49-72.
Foreword to the German Edition of Lilian Winstanley's Hamlet and the Scottish Succession.Carl Schmitt - 2010 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (153):164-177.
“Neither Simple Allusions Nor True Mirrorings”: Seeing Double with Carl Schmitt.Drew Daniel - 2010 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (153):51-69.
Political Aesthetics: Carl Schmitt on Hamlet.D. Pan - 1987 - Télos 1987 (72):153-159.
Stanley Cavell's Shakespeare.Gerald L. Bruns - 1990 - Critical Inquiry 16 (3):612-632.
The Tragic Theory of Carl Schmitt.Andrea Salvatore - 2012 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2012 (161):181-187.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2019-07-11

Total views
6 ( #988,506 of 2,280,568 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
5 ( #243,697 of 2,280,568 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes

Sign in to use this feature