Authors
Donald Rutherford
University of California, San Diego
Abstract
Abstract Nietzsche defends an ideal of freedom as the achievement of a ?higher human being?, whose value judgments are a product of a rigorous scrutiny of inherited values and an expression of how the answers to ultimate questions of value are ?settled in him?. I argue that Nietzsche's view is a recognizable descendent of ideas advanced by the ancient Stoics and Spinoza, for whom there is no contradiction between the realization of freedom and the affirmation of fate, and who restrict this freedom to rare individuals, who escape the bondage of conventional mores and passive emotional states. Although Nietzsche rejects key assumptions made by both the Stoics and Spinoza, his outlook is an extension of their efforts to elaborate the notion of freedom as an ideal
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DOI 10.1080/0020174X.2011.608885
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References found in this work BETA

Nietzsche on Morality.Brian Leiter - 2002/2014 - Routledge.
Nietzsche.John Richardson & Brian Leiter (eds.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
Nietzsche on Morality.Brian Leiter - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (3):729-740.
Nietzsche’s System.John Richardson - 1996 - Oxford University Press.

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Citations of this work BETA

Nietzsche Contra Stoicism: Naturalism and Value, Suffering and Amor Fati.James A. Mollison - 2019 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 62 (1):93-115.
Nietzschean Wholeness.Gabriel Zamosc - 2018 - In Paul Katsafanas (ed.), Routledge Philosophy Minds: Nietzsche. Routledge. pp. 169-185.
Spinoza and Nietzsche on Freedom Empowerment and Affirmation.Razvan Ioan - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):1864-1883.
Nietzsche's Ideal of Wholeness.Gabriel Zamosc - 2014 - Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad de Costa Rica 53 (137):9-31.

View all 8 citations / Add more citations

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