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Ariela Tubert
University of Puget Sound
  1. Nietzsche and Self-Constitution.Ariela Tubert - 2018 - In Paul Katsafanas (ed.), Routledge Philosophical Minds: The Nietzschean Mind. Routledge.
    This paper argues for interpreting Nietzsche along the lines of a self-constitution view. According to the self-constitution view, a person is a kind of creation: we constitute our selves throughout our lives. The self-constitution view may take more than one form: on the narrative version, the self is like a story, while on the Kantian version, the self is a set of principles or commitments. Taking Marya Schechtman’s and Christine Korsgaard’s accounts as paradigmatic, I take the self-constitution view to emphasize (...)
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  2. Constitutive Arguments.Ariela Tubert - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (8):656-666.
    Can the question "Why do what morality requires?" be answered in such a way that anyone regardless of their desires or interests has reason to be moral? One strategy for answering this question appeals to constitutive arguments. In general, constitutive arguments attempt to establish the normativity of rational requirements by pointing out that we are already committed to them insofar as we are believers or agents. This study is concerned with the general prospects for such arguments. It starts by explaining (...)
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  3. Korsgaard's Constitutive Arguments and the Principles of Practical Reason.Ariela Tubert - 2011 - Philosophical Quarterly 61 (243):343-362.
    Constitutive arguments for the principles of practical reason attempt to justify normative requirements by claiming that we already accept them in so far as we are believers or agents. In two constitutive arguments for the requirement that we must will universally, Korsgaard attempts first to arrive at the requirement that we will universally from observations about the causality of the will, and secondly to establish that willing universally is constitutive of having a self. Some rational requirements may be established by (...)
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  4. Sound Advice and Internal Reasons.Ariela Tubert - 2016 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2):181-199.
    Reasons internalism holds that reasons for action contain an essential connection with motivation. I defend an account of reasons internalism based on the advisor model. The advisor model provides an account of reasons for action in terms of the advice of a more rational version of the agent. Contrary to Pettit and Smith's proposal and responding to Sobel's and Johnson's objections, I argue that the advisor model can provide an account of internal reasons and that it is too caught up (...)
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  5.  55
    Ethical Machines?Ariela Tubert - 2018 - Seattle University Law Review 41 (4).
    This Article explores the possibility of having ethical artificial intelligence. It argues that we face a dilemma in trying to develop artificial intelligence that is ethical: either we have to be able to codify ethics as a set of rules or we have to value a machine’s ability to make ethical mistakes so that it can learn ethics like children do. Neither path seems very promising, though perhaps by thinking about the difficulties with each we may come to a better (...)
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  6.  95
    Nietzsche's Existentialist Freedom.Ariela Tubert - 2015 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 46 (3):409.
    Following Robert C. Solomon’s Living with Nietzsche, I defend an interpretation of Nietzsche’s views about freedom that are in line with the existentialist notion of self-creation. Given Nietzsche’s emphasis on the limitations on human freedom, his critique of the notion of causa sui (self-creation out of nothing), and his critique of morality for relying on the assumption that we have free will, it may be surprising that he could be taken seriously as an existentialist—existentialism characteristically takes freedom and self-creation to (...)
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  7.  20
    Book ReviewsPatrick R. Frierson, Freedom and Anthropology in Kant’s Moral Philosophy.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Pp. 211. $76.00. [REVIEW]Ariela Tubert - 2009 - Ethics 119 (4):768-773.
  8.  17
    Book ReviewsR. Kevin Hill,. Nietzsche’s Critiques: The Kantian Foundations of His Thought.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. Pp. 264. $72.00 ; $35.00. [REVIEW]Ariela Tubert - 2006 - Ethics 116 (4):789-791.
  9.  18
    Paul Katsafanas , Agency and the Foundations of Ethics: Nietzschean Constitutivism . Reviewed By. [REVIEW]Ariela Tubert - 2014 - Philosophy in Review 34 (6):316-318.
  10.  15
    The Affirmation of Life: Nietzsche on Overcoming Nihilism (Review). [REVIEW]Ariela Tubert - 2009 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 38 (1):90-92.
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    Slote, Michael. From Enlightenment to Receptivity: Rethinking Our Values.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Pp. 272. $49.95. [REVIEW]Ariela Tubert - 2015 - Ethics 126 (1):244-249.
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  12.  10
    Review: Michael Slote, From Enlightenment to Receptivity: Rethinking Our Values. [REVIEW]Ariela Tubert - 2015 - Ethics 126 (1):244-249.
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