Authors
Abstract
Research into robotic social learning, especially that concerned with imitation, often focuses at differing ends of a spectrum from observational learning at one end to following or matched-dependent behaviour at the other. We study the implications and differences that arise when carrying out experiments both at the extremes and within this spectrum. Physical Khepera robots with minimal sensory capabilities are used, and after training, experiments are carried out where an imitating robot perceives the dynamic movement behaviours of another model robot carrying a light source. It learns the movement behaviour of the model by either statically observing the model, dynamically observing the model or by following the model. It finally re-enacts the learnt behaviour. We compare the results of these re-enactments and illustrate the differences and trade-offs that arise between static observational and reactive following learning methods. We also consider circumstances where, for this robotic embodiment, dynamic observation has both advantages and disadvantages when compared to static observation. We conclude by discussing the implications that arise from using and combining these types of social learning.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1075/is.8.2.07sau
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 63,393
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

Is Imitation Learning the Route to Humanoid Robots?Stefan Schaal - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (6):233-242.
Toward Communication: First Imitations in Infants, Low-Functioning Children with Autism and Robots.Jacqueline Nadel, Arnaud Revel, Pierre Andry & Philippe Gaussier - 2004 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 5 (1):45-74.
Towards Robot Cultures?: Learning to Imitate in a Robotic Arm Test-Bed with Dissimilarly Embodied Agents.Aris Alissandrakis, Chrystopher L. Nehaniv & Kerstin Dautenhahn - 2004 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 5 (1):3-44.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Toward a Microanalysis of Imitative Actions.Stefan Vogt & David Carey - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):705-706.
Imitation as a Conjunction.Cecilia Heyes - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):28-29.
Imitation and the Effort of Learning.Justin H. G. Williams - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):40-41.
Is Imitation Learning the Route to Humanoid Robots?Stefan Schaal - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (6):233-242.
On the Moral Responsibility of Military Robots.Thomas Hellström - 2013 - Ethics and Information Technology 15 (2):99-107.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2013-12-30

Total views
96 ( #112,224 of 2,449,003 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #442,577 of 2,449,003 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes