Mexican Deaths in the Arizona Desert: The Culpability of Migrants, Humanitarian Workers, Governments, and Businesses [Book Review]

Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):365 - 376 (2009)
Abstract
Since the mid-1990s, there has been a rise in the number of deaths of undocumented Mexican migrants crossing the U.S./Mexican border. Who is responsible for these deaths? This article examines the culpability of (1) migrants, (2) humanitarian volunteers, (3) the Mexican government, (4) the U.S. government, and (5) U.S. businesses. A significant portion of the blame is assigned to U.S. free trade policies and U.S. businesses employing undocumented immigrants
Keywords border  human rights  humanitarian groups  immigration  Mexico  illegal migration  ethical theory  sociology
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Reprint years 2010
DOI 10.1007/s10551-009-0283-x
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Practical Ethics.Peter Singer - 1979 - Cambridge University Press.
The Sociological Imagination.C. Wright Mills - 1960 - British Journal of Educational Studies 9 (1):75-76.

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