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  1.  44
    Illocutionary Acts : Austin's Account and What Searle Made Out of It.Friedrich Christoph Dörge - unknown
    As is shown in the introduction of the book, the notion "illocutionary act" is used with quite a number of essentially different meanings; consequently, it is quite unclear what an "illocutionary act" is actually supposed to be. This problem is the starting point of the thesis. An argument is stated, to the effect that the introduction and use of scholarly terms like, for instance, "illocutionary act", or "performative sentence", is not entirely arbitrary. It is argued that technical terms should not (...)
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  2.  19
    Illokutionäre Akte und Konventionalität.Friedrich Christoph Dörge - 2000 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 60 (1):125-150.
    The Speech act models of Searle and Bach/Hamish mistakenly reconstruct Austin's concept of "illocutionary act". In Austin's view, "illocutionary acts" are not pure acts of communication but social acts achieved by communicative behavior. Following Searle's "Speech Acts" and Strawson's "Intention and Convention in Speech Acts" today's speech act theory looks upon illocutionary acts as pure acts of communication, involving "conventionality" (in a certain sense) only as part of speaker's meaning. However, following Austin, to perform an illocutionary act is to bring (...)
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  3. Illokutionäre Akte und Konventionalität.Friedrich Christoph Dörge - 2000 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 60 (1):125-150.
    The Speech act models of Searle and Bach/Hamish mistakenly reconstruct Austin's concept of "illocutionary act". In Austin's view, "illocutionary acts" are not pure acts of communication but social acts achieved by communicative behavior. Following Searle's "Speech Acts" and Strawson's "Intention and Convention in Speech Acts" today's speech act theory looks upon illocutionary acts as pure acts of communication, involving "conventionality" only as part of speaker's meaning. However, following Austin, to perform an illocutionary act is to bring about conventional consequences which (...)
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