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Profile: Hans-Johann Glock (University of Zürich)
  1. Animals, Thoughts and Concepts.H. J. Glock - 2000 - Synthese 123 (1):35-104.
    There are three main positions on animalthought: lingualism denies that non-linguistic animalshave any thoughts; mentalism maintains that theirthoughts differ from ours only in degree, due totheir different perceptual inputs; an intermediateposition, occupied by common sense and Wittgenstein,maintains that animals can have thoughts of a simplekind. This paper argues in favor of an intermediateposition. It considers the most important arguments infavor of lingualism, namely those inspired byDavidson: the argument from the intensional nature ofthought (Section 1); the idea that thoughts involveconcepts (Sections (...)
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    Abusing Use1.H. J. Glock - 1996 - Dialectica 50 (3):205-224.
    summaryThis paper discusses objections against the idea that the meaning of a word is its use. Sct. 1 accepts Rundle's point that ‘meaning’ and ‘use’ are used differently, but insists that this is compatible with holding that use determines meaning, an therefore holds the key to conceptual analysis. Scts. 2–4 rebut three lines of argument which claim that linguistic philosophy goes astray by reading into the meaning of words non‐semantic features of its use: Searle's general speech act fallacy charge, Hacker's (...)
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    Was Wittgenstein an Analytic Philosopher?H. J. Glock - unknown
    This article first surveys the established views on Wittgenstein's relation to analytic philosophy. Next it distinguishes among different ways of defining analytic philosophy—topical, doctrinal, methodological, stylistic, historical, and the idea that it is a family-resemblance concept. It argues that while certain stylistic features are important, the historical and the family-resemblance conceptions are the most auspicious, especially in combination. The answer to the title question is given in section 3. Contrary to currently popular “irrationalist” interpretations, Wittgenstein was an analytic philosopher in (...)
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    Externalism and First-Person Authority.H. J. Glock & John M. Preston - 1995 - The Monist 78 (4):515-33.
  5.  8
    Neural Representationalism.H. J. Glock - 2003 - Facta Philosophica 5 (1):105-129.
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    Was Wittgenstein an Analytic Philosopher?H. J. Glock - unknown
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    Philosophy.H. J. Glock - unknown
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  8. Was Wittgenstein an Analytic Philosopher?H. J. Glock - unknown
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  9. Was Wittgenstein an Analytic Philosopher?H. J. Glock - unknown
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