Results for 'Heather Lynne Reid'

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  1.  14
    The philosophical athlete.Heather Lynne Reid - 2019 - Durham, North Carolina: Carolina Academic Press.
    All athletes experience victory and defeat, but how many truly learn from the experience of sport? For ancient Greek philosophers, sport was an integral part of education. Today, athletics programs remain in schools, but we face a growing gap between the modern sports experience and enduring educational values. This book seeks to bridge that gap by advocating a philosophical approach to the sports experience. Combining issues and ideas from traditional philosophy with contemporary analyses of sport and applied "thinking activities," this (...)
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  2.  29
    The Philosophical Athlete By Heather L. Reid. Published 2002 by Carolina Academic Press, Durham, NC.Peter J. Arnold - 2004 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 31 (1):97-99.
    (2004). The Philosophical Athlete By Heather L. Reid. Published 2002 by Carolina Academic Press, Durham, NC. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport: Vol. 31, No. 1, pp. 97-99.
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  3.  10
    Olympic philosophy: the ideas and ideals behind the ancient and modern olympic games: by Heather L. Reid, Sioux City, Iowa, Parnassos Press, 2020, 458 pp., $39.99 (Paperback), ISBN 9781942495345.Daniel A. Dombrowski - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (1):146-153.
    This book is a collection of 26 previously published essays on ‘Olympic philosophy,’ both ancient and modern. Because the essays were published over the past 20 years in various journals and books,...
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  4.  7
    Aretism: An Ancient Sports Philosophy for the Modern Sports World.Heather Reid & Mark Holowchak - 2011 - Lexington Books.
    Aretism: An Ancient Sports Philosophy for the Modern Sports World provides a tripartite model of sports ethics founded on ancient Greek principles and focused on personal, civic, and global integration. Heather Reid and Mark Holowchak apply these concepts as a "golden mean" between the extremes of the commercialist and recreational models of competition. This treatment is most applicable to students and academics concerned with the philosophy of sport, but will also be of interest to those in sports professions.
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  5. Looking at Beauty to Kalon in Western Greece: Selected Essays from the 2018 Symposium on the Heritage of Western Greece.Heather L. Reid & Tony Leyh (eds.) - 2019 - Parnassos Press-Fonte Aretusa.
    The ancient Greek word kalon can be translated as beautiful, good, noble, or fine—yet somehow it transcends any one of those concepts. In art and literature, it can apply straightforwardly to figures like Helen or Aphrodite, or enigmatically to the pais kalos: the youthful athlete that decorates so much sympotic pottery. In the philosophy of Plato, Aristotle and Plotinus, meanwhile, it takes on an ethical, even transcendent dimension. And yet, the thread between a beautiful painting and the Platonic form of (...)
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  6.  9
    Introduction to the Philosophy of Sport.Heather Reid - 2012 - Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Introduction to the Philosophy of Sport begins with the history of sport, delves into both the metaphysics and ethics of sport, and also addresses dimensions of the social and political elements of sport. This book is a comprehensive introduction to the philosophy of sport with a straightforward layout that professors can plan and build their courses around.
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  7.  25
    Narrative Constructions of Health Care Issues and Policies: The Case of President Clinton’s Apology-by-Proxy for the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment. [REVIEW]Heather J. Carmack, Benjamin R. Bates & Lynn M. Harter - 2008 - Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (2):89-109.
    The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment (TSE) has shaped African Americans’ views of the American health care system, contributing to a reluctance to participate in biomedical research and a suspicion of the medical system. This essay examines public discourses surrounding President Clinton’s attempt to restore African Americans’ trust by apologizing for the TSE. Through a narrative reading, we illustrate the failure of this text as an attempt to reconcile the United States Public Health Service and the African American public. We conclude by (...)
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  8.  17
    Why Olympia matters for modern sport.Heather L. Reid - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):159-173.
    From the modern scientific perspective, Olympia is a ruin at the far end of a fading sense of history that represents little more than the origins from which sport has continuously evolved. Quantitative measurements show continued increases in human performance, equipment efficiency and funding. But some question this athletic evolution. We worry about qualitative issues, such as virtue, meaning and beauty. The source of this contrast is a difference in values: Olympic vs. Efficiency values. Such values establish an ethos in (...)
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  9.  63
    Athletes as heroes and role models: an ancient model.Heather Reid - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):40-51.
    A common argument for the social value of sport is that athletes serve as heroes who inspire people – especially young people – to strive for excellence. This argument has been questioned by sport philosophers at a variety of levels. Not only do athletes seem unsuited to be heroes or role models in the conventional sense, it is unclear more generally what the social and educational value of athletic excellence could be. In this essay, I construct an argument for the (...)
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  10. Plato's Gymnastic Dialogues.Heather Reid - 2020 - In Mark Ralkowski Heather Reid (ed.), Athletics, Gymnastics, and Agon in Plato. Sioux City, IA, USA: pp. 15-30.
    It is not mere coincidence that several of Plato’s dialogues are set in gymnasia and palaistrai (wrestling schools), employ the gymnastic language of stripping, wrestling, tripping, even helping opponents to their feet, and imitate in argumentative form the athletic contests (agōnes) commonly associated with that place. The main explanation for this is, of course, historical. Sophists, orators, and intellectuals of all stripes, including the historical Socrates, really did frequent Athens’ gymnasia and palaistrai in search of ready audiences and potential students. (...)
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  11.  45
    Sport and Moral Education in Plato’s Republic.Heather L. Reid - 2007 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 34 (2):160-175.
  12.  38
    Sport, Philosophy, and the Quest for Knowledge.Heather L. Reid - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (1):40-49.
  13.  21
    Olympic Sport and Its Lessons for Peace.Heather L. Reid - 2006 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 33 (2):205-214.
  14.  48
    Athletic Beauty in Classical Greece: A Philosophical View.Heather Reid - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (2):281-297.
    Classical Greece is famous for its athletic art, particularly the image of the nude male athlete. But how did the Greeks understand athletic beauty? Plato, Aristotle, Xenophon, and others discuss athletes? beauty, while the educational ideal of kalokagathia conceptually connects athletic beauty with the good. More questions need to be answered, however, if we are to understand ancient athletic beauty. We need to ask ourselves what the Greeks appreciated when they looked at athletic bodies. What did those qualities mean to (...)
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  15.  13
    Plato at Syracuse: Essays on Plato in Western Greece with a new translation of the Seventh Letter by Jonah Radding.Heather Reid & Mark Ralkowski (eds.) - 2019 - Parnassos Press- Fonte Aretusa.
    This book is born from a desire to understand how Plato influenced and was influenced by the intellectual culture of Western Greece, the ancient Hellenic cities of Sicily and Southern Italy. In 2018, a seminar on Plato at Syracuse was organized, in which a small group of scholars discussed a new translation of the Seventh Letter and several essays on the topic. The seminar was intense but friendly, having attracted a diverse group of scholars that ranged from graduate students to (...)
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  16.  16
    Plato on women in sport.Heather Reid - 2020 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (3):344-361.
    In a way, there is nothing surprising about Plato’s promotion of sport for women in Republic and Laws; it is logically implied by his philosophical theories. In another way, Plato’s vision of femal...
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  17.  21
    Aristotle's pentathlete.Heather L. Reid - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (2):183-94.
    Beauty varies with each age. In a young man, it consists in possessing a body capable of enduring all efforts, either of the racecourse or of bodily strength, while he himself is pleasant to look u...
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  18.  10
    Responsibility, Inefficiency, and the Spirit of Sport.Heather L. Reid - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (6):22-23.
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  19. Athletics and philosophy in ancient Greece and Rome: Contests of virtue.Heather L. Reid - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (2):109-234.
     
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  20.  44
    Athletic virtue: Between east and west.Heather L. Reid - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (1):16 – 26.
    Despite the rich philosophical heritage of the East, the connection between athletics and education for character or virtue is more commonly associated with the West. Classical Eastern philosophy does focus on virtue, but it seems to exclude sport as a means of cultivation since the Confucian is uninterested in victory and the Daoist seeks passivity and avoids contention. A closer look reveals, however, that Eastern conceptions of virtue have much in common with those of Ancient Greece so often linked to (...)
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  21.  44
    Was the Roman Gladiator an Athlete?Heather L. Reid - 2006 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 33 (1):37-49.
  22.  7
    Athletic virtue and aesthetic values in Aristotle’s ethics.Heather Reid - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (1):63-74.
    ABSTRACTWhen Aristotle praises pentathletes’ beauty at Rhetoric 1361b, it is not the idle observation of a sports fan. In fact, the balanced and harmonious beauty of athletes’ bodies reflects Aristotle’s ideal of a virtuous soul in the Nicomachean Ethics: one which discerns noble ends and means, then acts accordingly. At Eudemian Ethics 1248b, he takes it a step further, characterizing kalokagathia as ‘the virtue that arises from a combination’ of virtues. These passages raise important questions about the relationship between ethics, (...)
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  23.  24
    Wrestling with Socrates.Heather L. Reid - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (2):157-69.
  24.  12
    Boxing with tyrants.Heather L. Reid - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (2):146-56.
    Wreathed in myrtle, my sword I'll conceal Like those champions devoted and brave, When they plunged in the tyrant their steel And to Athens deliverance gave. (Edgar Allan Poe, ‘Hymn to Harmodius an...
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  25. The Athletic Aesthetic in Rome's Imperial Baths.Heather Reid - 2020 - Estetica. Studi E Ricerche 1 (1):255-274.
    The Greek gymnasium was replicated in the architecture, art, and activities of the Imperial Roman thermae. This mimēsis was rooted in sincere admiration of traditional Greek paideia – especially the glory of Athens’ Academy and Lyceum – but it did not manage to replicate the gymnasium’s educational impact. This article reconstructs the aesthetics of a visit to the Roman baths, explaining how they evoked a glorious Hellenic past, offering the opportunity to Romans to imagine being «Greek». But true Hellenic paideia (...)
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  26. Wrestling with the Eleatics in Plato's Parmenides.Heather Reid & Lidia Palumbo - 2020 - In Athletics, Gymnastics, and Agon in Plato. Sioux City, IA, USA: pp. 185-198.
    This paper interprets the Parmenides agonistically as a constructive contest between Plato’s Socrates and the Eleatics of Western Greece. Not only is the dialogue set in the agonistic context of the Panathenaic Games, it features agonistic language, employs an agonistic method, and may even present an agonistic model for participation in the forms. The inspiration for this agonistic motif may be that Parmenides and his student Zeno represent Western Greece, which was a key rival for the mainland at the Olympics (...)
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  27. Athlete Agency and the Spirit of Olympic Sport.Heather Reid - 2020 - Journal of Olympic Studies 1 (1):22-36.
    A debate has arisen over whether “the spirit of sport” is an appropriate criterion for determining whether a substance should be banned. In this paper, I argue that the criterion is crucial for Olympic sport because Olympism celebrates humanity, specifically human agency, so we need to preserve the degree to which athletes are personally and morally responsible for their performances. This emphasis on what I call “athlete agency” is reflected metaphysically in the structure of sport, which characteristically prescribes inefficiencies in (...)
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  28.  14
    Plato's gymnasium.Heather L. Reid - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (2):170-82.
  29.  49
    Olympic Sacrifice: A Modern Look at an Ancient Tradition.Heather L. Reid - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 73:197-210.
    The inspiration for this paper came rather unexpectedly. In February 2006, I made the long trip from my home in Sioux City, Iowa, to Torino, Italy in order to witness the Olympic Winter Games. Barely a month later, I found myself in California at the newly-renovated Getty Villa, home to one of the world's great collections of Greco-Roman antiquities. At the Villa I attended a talk about a Roman mosaic depicting a boxing scene from Virgil's Aeneid. The tiny tiles showed (...)
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  30. The Art of Teaching Philosophy in Plato’s Lysis.Heather Reid - 2005 - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 16 (1-2).
  31.  43
    Plato’s Socrates as Educator. [REVIEW]Heather L. Reid - 2003 - Teaching Philosophy 26 (2):188-192.
  32. Athletics, Gymnastics, and Agon in Plato.Heather Reid, Mark Ralkowski & Coleen P. Zoller (eds.) - 2020 - Sioux City, IA, USA: Parnassos Press.
    In the Panathenaic Games, there was a torch race for teams of ephebes that started from the altars of Eros and Prometheus at Plato’s Academy and finished on the Acropolis at the altar of Athena, goddess of wisdom. It was competitive, yes, but it was also sacred, aimed at a noble goal. To win, you needed to cooperate with your teammates and keep the delicate flame alive as you ran up the hill. Likewise, Plato’s philosophy combines competition and cooperation in (...)
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  33. Olympic Philosophy: The Ideas and Ideals Behind the Ancient and Modern Olympic Games.Heather Reid - 2020 - Sioux City, IA, USA: Parnassos Press.
    The Olympic Games are a sporting event guided by philosophy. The modern Olympic Charter calls this philosophy “Olympism” and boldly states its goal as nothing less than “the harmonious development of humankind” and the promotion of “a peaceful society concerned with the preservation of human dignity.” The ideas and ideals behind Olympism, however, are ancient—tracing their roots to archaic and classical Greece, just like the Games do. This collection of essays explores the ancient Hellenic roots of Olympic philosophy and explain (...)
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  34. Politics and Performance in Western Greece: Essays on the Hellenic Heritage of Sicily and Southern Italy (The Heritage of Western Greece Book 2).Heather Reid (ed.) - 2017 - Sioux City, Iowa: Parnassos Press.
  35. Politics and Performance in Western Greece: Essays on the Hellenic Heritage of Sicily and Southern Italy. The Heritage of Western Greece, Book 2.Heather Reid (ed.) - 2017 - Parnassos Press.
    Because the histories of theater, politics, art, poetry, athletics, and philosophy tend to be studied separately, it is easy to forget how interconnected they were in Western Greece—the coastal areas of Southern Italy and Sicily settled by Hellenes in the 8th and 7th centuries BCE. Hieron I of Syracuse may be remembered as a tyrant, but his political power was inseparable from the theater. Hieron was the patron of the dramatist Epicharmus, who was as much a philosopher as Xenophanes, who (...)
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  36. The freedom of the long-distance runner.Heather L. Reid - 2007 - In Michael W. Austin (ed.), Running and Philosophy: A Marathon for the Mind. Blackwell.
     
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  37. The Many Faces of Mimesis: Selected Essays from the 2017 Symposium on the Hellenic Heritage of Western Greece (Heritage of Western Greece Series, Book 3).Heather Reid & Jeremy DeLong (eds.) - 2018 - Sioux city, Iowa: Parnassos Press.
    Mimesis can refer to imitation, emulation, representation, or reenactment - and it is a concept that links together many aspects of ancient Greek Culture. The Western Greek bell-krater on the cover, for example, is painted with a scene from a phlyax play with performers imitating mythical characters drawn from poetry, which also represent collective cultural beliefs and practices. One figure is shown playing a flute, the music from which might imitate nature, or represent deeper truths of the cosmos based upon (...)
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  38. Themata Politico: Hellenic and Euro-Atlantic. [REVIEW]Heather Reid - 2009 - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 20.
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  39.  48
    The Political Heritage of the Olympic Games: Relevance, Risks, and Possible Rewards.Heather L. Reid - 2012 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (2):108-122.
    The Olympic movement sometimes claims that sport has nothing to do with politics, yet its goal of promoting peace is explicitly political. The Olympics' association with peace, furthermore, is inherited from the ancient version of the festival which took place in a very distant time and place. This essay examines the ancient political heritage of the Olympic Games and questions its relevance to such modern Olympic challenges as globalisation, cultural hegemony, social discrimination and environmental degradation. It suggests that these challenges (...)
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  40.  20
    Sages, Heroes, and The Battle for Cycling’s Soul.Heather L. Reid - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (1-2):51-66.
    Using my experience at a stage of the 2014 Giro d'Italia, I argue that de is the soul of cycling and that ancient Chinese philosophy's insight into the conditions that promote de may help the sport. I compare the relationship between sages and virtuous practitioners, to the ancient Greek relationship between heroes and athletes, both of which depend on the performance of de. I also criticize modern cycling for its focus on technology, stark commercialism, and emphasis on the individual, prescribing (...)
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  41.  17
    The beginnings of professional sport - roubineau milon de crotone ou l'invention du sport. Pp. 355, ills, maps. Paris: Presses universitaires de France, 2016. Paper, €22. Isbn: 978-2-13-065369-1. [REVIEW]Heather L. Reid - 2017 - The Classical Review 67 (2):457-459.
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  42.  27
    The Socratic Agon: Turning Philonikia toward Philosophia in Plato’s Dialogues.Heather L. Reid - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:173-183.
    It often surprises modern readers to find the cerebral philosopher Socrates hanging out in gymnasia and wrestling schools. We tend to downplay Socrates’ association with athletes and contest as mere literary window-dressing. I would like to suggest, to the contrary, that Plato’s depiction of Socrates as an athlete goes beyond dramatic setting and linguistic metaphor. Plato actually presents Socrates as an athlete of the soul, engaged in intellectual contest, occasionally defeating his opponents, and coaching young protégées toward victory in the (...)
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  43.  23
    Olympic Epistemology: The Athletic Roots of Philosophical Reasoning.Heather L. Reid - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 47:19-28.
    The ancient world witnessed a meaningful transition in the conception of human thought and belief. What some have called the “discovery” of the mind can also be understood as a release from dependence on oracular wisdom and mythological explanation, made possible by the invention of more reliable and democratic methods for discovering and explaining truths. During roughly the same epoch, Hellenic sport distinguished itself by developing objective mechanisms for selecting single winners from varied pools of contestants. Is there a connection? (...)
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  44.  8
    Heroic Parthenoi and the Virtues of Independence: A Feminine Philosophical Perspective on the Origins of Women’s Sport.Heather Reid - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 14 (4):511-524.
    Her name was Flavia Thalassia and she came from Ephesus. She won the stadion for parthenoi at the Isolympic Sebasta Games in Naples during Domitian’s reign in the late 1st c. C...
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  45.  7
    The Ethics of Efficiency.Heather L. Reid - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 63:25-32.
    Ethics in sport demand not only that we respect ourselves and others, but also that we respect sport itself. But the question of respecting sport seems to create a kind of moral dilemma between the obligation to “play one’s best” by maximizing performance, and the obligation to follow rules and traditions that ban the use of ergogenic aids. It is often argued that bans on performance-enhancing substances, equipment, and training techniques are paternalistic and violate athletes’ liberty to rationally accept risks (...)
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  46.  18
    The Bloomsbury Companion to the Philosophy of Sport.Heather L. Reid - 2015 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 9 (1):83-86.
  47.  27
    Contemporary Athletics and Ancient Greek Ideals.Heather L. Reid - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (3):359-361.
  48.  14
    The “Hand of God”'s: Essays in the Philosophy of Sport By Claudio M. Tamburrini. Published 2000 by Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis, Box 222, SE-405 30, Sweden. [REVIEW]Heather L. Reid - 2002 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 29 (2):182-186.
  49.  16
    Ethics & Sport.Heather L. Reid - 1999 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 26 (1):113-116.
  50.  13
    Sports, Virtues and Vices: Morality Plays: By Mike McNamee. Published 2007 by Routledge, London and New York.Heather L. Reid - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (2):263-265.
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