12 found

Year:

  1.  1
    Henry of Langenstein’s Principium on the Sentences, His Fellow Parisian Bachelors, and the Academic Year 1371-1372.Monica Brînzei & Chris Schabel - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (4):335-346.
    This research note identifies for the first time the principium on book I of the Sentences by the prolific polymath Henry of Langenstein. This discovery, when combined with the four principia of the Augustinian Denis of Modena, provides the evidence necessary to demonstrate that Langenstein lectured on the Sentences at Paris in 1371-1372. The note also establishes the identity of the other eight bachelors of theology who participated in the principial debates that year.
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  2.  3
    Metaphysics as a Way of Life: Heymericus de Campo on Universals and the “Inner Man”.Dragos Calma - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (4):305-334.
    Pierre Hadot famously claimed that, between Antiquity and German Idealism, Western philosophy had lost its practical role of guiding the life of the practitioner. Scholars who challenged this view focused on two medieval models. This article argues that the overlooked work Colliget principiorum iuris naturalis, divini et humani philosophice doctrinalium by Heymericus de Campo postulates a third model. On the basis of St. Paul’s teaching about the “inner man,” Heymericus reconsiders the Aristotelian doctrines of abstraction and of being as such (...)
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  3.  3
    The Rule of Contradictory Pairs, Insolubles and Validity.Stephen Read - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (4):275-304.
    The Oxford Calculator Roger Swyneshed put forward three provocative claims in his treatise on insolubles, written in the early 1330s, of which the second states that there is a formally valid inference with true premises and false conclusion. His example deployed the Liar paradox as the conclusion of the inference: ‘The conclusion of this inference is false, so this conclusion is false’. His account of insolubles supported his claim that the conclusion is false, and so the premise, referring to the (...)
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  4. John Wyclif, Edited by Luigi Campi.Chris Schabel - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (4):351-356.
  5.  1
    Thierry of Chartres, Edited by Irene Caiazzo.Justin Stover - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (4):347-350.
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  6.  78
    Duces Caecorum: On Two Recent Translations of Wyclif.Mark Thakkar - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (4):357-383.
    Two recent publications have greatly increased the amount of Wyclif available in translation: the Trialogus, translated by Stephen Lahey, and a thematic anthology translated by Stephen Penn. This review article documents the failings that make these translations worse than useless. A post mortem leads the author to claim that the publication of these volumes, the first of which has already been warmly received, is a sign of a gathering crisis in medieval studies, and one that we should take steps to (...)
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  7.  10
    NoticeThe Retraction of Articles Due to Plagiarism._ _ - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (4):256-274.
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  8.  11
    The Unity of Composite Substance: The Scholastic Background to the Vinculum Substantiale in Leibniz’s Correspondence with Des Bosses.Jean-Pascal Anfray - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (3):219-252.
    This paper explores the scholastic context of the discussion about the unity of the composite or corporeal substance and the nature of the vinculum substantiale or substantial bond in Leibniz’s correspondence with Des Bosses. Three prominent scholastic views are examined: Duns Scotus’s antireductionist account of the composite substance as an entity irreducible to its essential parts ; Ockham’s parts-whole identity thesis, which entails a reductionist view of the composite substance; and Suárez’s explanation of the unity of composite substance through the (...)
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  9.  11
    Introduction: Material Substance and Quantity, From Suárez to Leibniz.Jean-Pascal Anfray & Tad M. Schmaltz - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (3):141-142.
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  10.  9
    Kenelm Digby on Quantity as Divisibility.Martine Pécharman - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (3):191-218.
    Kenelm Digby’s Two Treatises, of the Nature of Bodies and of the Nature of Mans Soule defends quite an idiosyncratic approach to mind-body dualism. In his use of the divisibility argument to prove that the human soul cannot be a material substance, Digby takes an uncompromising stand for merely potential material parts. In his Treatise of Bodies the present article focuses on the mode of construction of the definition of quantity as divisibility and on its links to two distinct fundamental (...)
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  11.  8
    Suárez on the Unity of Material Substances.Dominik Perler - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (3):143-167.
    Many late medieval Aristotelians assumed that a natural substance has several substantial forms in addition to matter as really distinct parts. This assumption gave rise to a unity problem: why is a substance more than a conglomeration of all these parts? This paper discusses Francisco Suárez’s answer. It first shows that he rejected the idea that there is a plurality of forms, emphasizing instead that each substance has a single form and hence a single structuring principle. It then examines his (...)
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  12.  10
    Quantity and Extension in Suárez and Descartes.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (3):168-190.
    This paper compares the development of the notion of continuous quantity in the work of Francisco Suárez and René Descartes. The discussion begins with a consideration of Suárez’s rejection of the view – common to ‘realists’ such as Thomas Aquinas and ‘nominalists’ such as William of Ockham – that quantity is inseparable from the extension of material integral parts. Crucial here is Suárez’s view that quantified extension exhibits a kind of impenetrability that distinguishes it from other kinds of extension. This (...)
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