Year:

  1.  1
    Interpretation, Relevance and the Ideological Effects of Discursive Practice.Stavros Assimakopoulos - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (2):394-415.
    Research in Critical Discourse Studies has for long recognised the central role that both direct and indirect communicative strategies play in the reproduction of social inequality, but a main proponent of this approach has expressed scepticism with regard to the contribution that theories of pragmatics which specifically focus on speaker intentions can make to its agenda. This paper sets out to examine how relevance theory’s theoretical machinery can be applied to the critical discussion of ideology in discourse, by offering insights (...)
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  2.  1
    Metaphor and Mental Shortcuts.Elly Ifantidou & Anna Piata - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (2):299-320.
    Cognitive-pragmatic approaches to how metaphors are understood view the activation of perceptual or motor effects as inferred. Crucially, inferences elicit conceptual representations, e.g. in the form of implicatures, and/or mental simulations, e.g. in the form of imagery, memory, an impression and other private elements. Emotional effects, being non-conceptual, must be left out of this picture. But evidence in neurolinguistics and psycholinguistics has shown that metaphors activate brain regions linked to emotions, and that in L2, in the absence of fully-propositional meaning, (...)
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  3. Why Truth Matters.Jacques Moeschler - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (2):416-440.
    This article is about truth and relevance. It first discusses the concept of truth in formal semantics and pragmatics, mainly the Gricean, neo-Gricean and post-Gricean approaches to meaning. What is particularly crucial is the relationship between pragmatic meaning and truth, since, from a Gricean perspective, meaning is defined as non-truth-conditional, which in turn raises the question of how truth can be a pragmatic issue. A second issue is the relationship between truth and relevance, as developed in relevance theory. A third (...)
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  4. On the Interpretation of Utterances with Expressive Expletives.Manuel Padilla Cruz - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (2):252-276.
    Expressive adjectives or expressive expletives have been argued to voice the speaker’s attitude towards the referent of the noun with which they co-occur, even though the attitude may be felt to be expressed about the referent of another sentential constituent or the state of affairs alluded to in the sentence where they are inserted. A previous pragmatic approach suggests that this is possible because these expletives perform an individual speech act, while a syntactic approach posits a feature whose detachment from (...)
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  5. New Developments in Relevance Theory.Manuel Padilla Cruz & Agnieszka Piskorska - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (2):223-227.
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  6. Being Ambivalent by Exploiting Indeterminacy in the Explicit Import of an Utterance.Agnieszka Piskorska - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (2):376-393.
    In line with recent interest in weak and often not fully determinate effects of communication permeating relevance-theoretic research, I contribute a discussion on two possible sources of speaker-intended indeterminacy within explicit import of an utterance: one residing in an intentionally underspecified location of an ad hoc concept between literal or non-literal interpretation, and the other lying in the higher-level explicature of an utterance, and being related to propositional attitude or speech-act description. In both cases, the speaker leaves a certain amount (...)
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  7. Onomatopoeia, Translation and Relevance.Ryoko Sasamoto - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (2):347-375.
    It is generally acknowledged that onomatopoeia poses challenges for translation. However, there is little research into the translation of onomatopoeia in Pragmatics. This study seeks to examine the nature of onomatopoeia and its implications for translation from the perspective of relevance theory, addressing, in particular, the following questions: Can notions from pragmatics help to account for the perceived challenges involved in translating onomatopoeia? Would the showing-meaning nature affect the translation of onomatopoeia? What other factors result in difficulties in translating onomatopoeia (...)
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  8. Pragmatic Resolutions of Temporal and Aspectual Mismatches.Louis de Saussure - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (2):228-251.
    This paper proposes a pragmatic solution to utterances where the various indicators of time and aspect seem to have divergent temporal reference and aspectual properties. This type of cases is usually treated at the semantic level as ‘mismatches’ and resolved compositionally through logical operations of ‘aspectual coercion’. We suggest on the contrary that no such effect of ‘mismatch resolution’ or ‘coercion’ is at work: these utterances are worked out inferentially according to the various pieces of evidence they provide for their (...)
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  9.  1
    Memes as Multimodal Metaphors.Kate Scott - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (2):277-298.
    In this article I analyse object labelling image macro internet memes as multimodal metaphors, taking the Distracted Boyfriend meme as a case study. Object labelling memes are multimodal texts in which users add labels to a stock photograph to convey messages that are often humorous or satirical in nature. Using the relevance-theoretic account of metaphor, I argue that object labelling memes are multimodal metaphors which are interpreted using the same processes as verbal metaphors. The labelling of the image guides the (...)
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  10. Relevance.Tim Wharton - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (2):321-346.
    Deirdre Wilson provides a reflective overview of a volume devoted to the historic application of relevance-theoretic ideas to literary studies. She maintains a view argued elsewhere that the putative non-propositional nature of literary effects are an illusion, a view which dates to Sperber and Wilson : “If you look at [non-propositional] affective effects through the microscope of relevance theory, you see a wide array of minute cognitive [i.e., propositional] effects.” This paper suggests an alternative, that modern-day humans have two apparently (...)
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  11.  6
    When Humour Questions Taboo.Philipp Heidepeter & Ursula Reutner - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (1):138-166.
    The article examines the ways in which humour twists regular euphemism use. Based on the classical fields of euphemisms anchored in religion, aesthetics, social politics, and amorality, it identifies the characteristics of their twisted variants with a humorous component: playing-with-fire euphemisms that jocosely provoke supernatural forces, innuendo euphemisms that entertain, mocking euphemisms that make fun of others in a teasing or demeaning way, and idealistic euphemisms that uncover obfuscating language and negative realities. Using English, German, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish (...)
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  12.  1
    Circumnavigating Taboos.Melanie Keller, Philipp Striedl, Daniel Biro, Johanna Holzer & Kate Burridge - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (1):5-24.
    This article elaborates on Wolfgang Schulze’s keynote speech of the same title at the 26th LIPP Symposium in Munich in 2019. It is based on the slides from his talk and various teaching materials, of which some figures have been translated from German to English before their inclusion in this article. While this article’s foundation rests on Schulze’s theories and research, we have done our best to build upon his work; direct quotes and key concepts of his will be cited (...)
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  13.  1
    Sex, Death & Politics – Taboos in Language.Melanie Keller, Philipp Striedl, Daniel Biro, Johanna Holzer & Benjamin Weber - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (1):1-4.
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  14.  6
    The Sound of Taboo.Robin Vallery & Maarten Lemmens - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (1):87-137.
    Swear words of English and French, both real and fictional ones, significantly tend to contain the least sonorous consonants, compared to the rest of the lexicon. What can explain the overrepresentation of such sounds among swear words? This might be a case of sound symbolism, when sounds are unconsciously associated with a meaning. We examine the pragmatic vs. semantic nature of the meaning involved, as well as two explanations in terms of iconicity. This unusual sound-meaning pairing would involve an emotional-contextual, (...)
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  15.  3
    Borrowing and the Historical LGBTQ Lexicon.Nicholas Lo Vecchio - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (1):167-192.
    Unlike most areas involving taboo, where language-internal innovations tend to dominate, homosexuality is characterized by a basic international vocabulary shared across multiple languages, notably English, French, Italian, Spanish and German. Historically, the lexis of nonnormative gender identity has shared space with that of sexual orientation. This lexicon includes the following series of internationalisms: sodomite, bugger, bardash, berdache, tribade, pederast, sapphist, lesbian, uranist, invert, homosexual, bisexual, trans, gay, queer. This common terminology has resulted from language contact in a broad sense, and (...)
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  16.  2
    Tongan Honorifics and Their Underlying Concepts of Mana and Tapu.Svenja Völkel - 2021 - Pragmatics and Cognition 28 (1):25-56.
    The Tongan language has honorific registers, called a ‘language of respect’. These are two limited sets of lexemes used to refer to people of chiefly and kingly rank and thus honour the societal stratification. Anthropological-linguistic research reveals that these honorifics are a tapu-motivated linguistic practice. The Polynesian concept of tapu means that entities with more mana such as persons of higher rank and their personal belongings are ‘sacred’, and it is ‘forbidden’ to get in physical touch with them. The respectful (...)
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