Authors
Eske Møllgaard
University of Rhode Island
Abstract
Wei-ming’s discourse has been badly understood by some Western philosophers who study Confucianism. I suggest that this misunderstanding stems from the fact that these philosophers fail to realize that Confucian discourse is in an entirely different register from Western philosophical discourse. I then propose my own preliminary definition of Confucian discourse in five points and present a structural analysis of a text by Tu Wei-ming. Finally, I consider which features of Tu’s discourse can properly be called Confucian. The answer to this question reflects not only on Tu but also on Confucian discourse and the study of Confucianism in general
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DOI 10.1007/s11712-007-9023-z
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Concluding Unscientific Postscript.Søen Kierkegaard & Walter Lowrie - 1941 - Princeton University Press for American-Scandinavian Foundation.
Concluding Unscientific Postscript.Søren Kierkegaard - 2019 - Princeton University Press.
The Normative Impact of Comparative Ethics: Human Rights.Chad Hansen - 2004 - In Kwong-loi Shun & David B. Wong (eds.), Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 72--99.

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