Philosophy of Management 20 (1):57-73 (2021)

Authors
Payman Tajalli
Macquarie University (PhD)
Abstract
In this paper I engage the theonomous ethics of Paul Tillich to argue that morality is a matter of conviction and concern not determination of right or wrong, and moral imperative is not about doing what “right” is, rather it is the self-actualisation of individual through her intersubjective relationships. The motivational force behind self-actualisation stems from the strength of one’s hold on “ultimate concern”, and not the content of “ultimate concern” that maybe referred to by various names including God. The ultimacy and unconditionality of “ultimate concern” gives morality its religious character and imperativeness. The paper suggests that business should provide an environment in which individual’s moral motivational force can be strengthened through removal of the impediments that weaken one’s hold on “ultimate concern”.
Keywords Business Ethics  Existentialism  Paul Tillich  Theonomy  Ultimate Concern  Moral Motivation
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DOI 10.1007/s40926-020-00143-z
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References found in this work BETA

The Courage to Be.Paul Tillich - 1952 - Yale University Press.
Corporate Governance and the Ethics of Narcissus.John Roberts - 2001 - Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (1):109-127.

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