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  1.  24
    The New Anarchy: Globalisation and Fragmentation in World Politics.Philip G. Cerny & Alex Prichard - 2017 - Journal of International Political Theory 13 (3):378-394.
    Modern International Relations theory has consistently underestimated the depth of the problem of anarchy in world politics. Contemporary theories of globalisation bring this into bold relief. From this perspective, the complexity of transboundary networks and hierarchies, economic sectors, ethnic and religious ties, civil and cross-border wars, and internally disaggregated and transnationally connected state actors, leads to a complex and multidimensional restructuring of the global, the local and the uneven connections in between. We ought to abandon the idea of ‘high’ and (...)
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  2.  19
    Collective Intentionality, Complex Pluralism and the Problem of Anarchy.Philip G. Cerny & Alex Prichard - 2017 - Journal of International Political Theory 13 (3).
    In this article, I argue that contemporary theories of collective intentionality force us to think about anarchy in new and challenging ways. In the years since Wendt declared the state a person, the collective intentionality of groups has become the focus of important scholarship across the humanities and social sciences. But this literature will not sit easily with mainstream International Relations for two reasons. First, contemporary theories of collective intentionality are difficult to square with the idea that the personified state (...)
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  3.  14
    Anarchy and International Relations Theory: A Reconsideration.Jonathan Havercroft & Alex Prichard - 2017 - Journal of International Political Theory 13 (3):252-265.
    In this introduction to the Special Issue, we undertake a little ground clearing in order to make room in International Relations for thinking differently about anarchy and world politics. Anarchy’s roots in, and association with, social contract theory and the state of nature has unduly narrowed how we might understand the concept and its potential in International Relations. Indeed, such is the consensus in this regard that anarchy is remarkably uncontested, considering its centrality to the field. Looking around, both inside (...)
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