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  1. Industrial Policy in the United States: A Neo-Polanyian Interpretation.Josh Whitford & Andrew Schrank - 2009 - Politics and Society 37 (4):521-553.
    The conventional wisdom holds that U.S. political institutions are inhospitable to industrial policy. The authors call the conventional wisdom into question by making four claims: the activities targeted by industrial policy are increasingly governed by decentralized production networks rather than markets or hierarchies, “network failures” are therefore no less threatening to industrial dynamism than market or organizational failures, the spatial and organizational decentralization of production have simultaneously increased the demand and broadened the support for American industrial policy, and political decentralization (...)
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  2.  1
    Credit Where Credit Is Due: Open Economy Industrial Policy and Export Diversification in Latin America and the Caribbean.Marcus J. Kurtz & Andrew Schrank - 2005 - Politics and Society 33 (4):671-702.
    Do activist trade and industrial policies offer developing countries a viable alternative to either neoliberal or mercantilist development regimes? We hope to answer the question by, first, distinguishing the “open economy industrial policies” in vogue today from either their “closed economy” predecessors—i.e., import-substituting industrialization—or more orthodox approaches to development policy making; second, tracing the growth of nontraditional exports from Latin America and the Caribbean to the diffusion of more active approaches in the 1990s; and, third, accounting for activism’s apparent success (...)
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  3.  41
    Foreign Investors, “Flying Geese,” and the Limits to Export-Led Industrialization in the Dominican Republic.Andrew Schrank - 2003 - Theory and Society 32 (4):415-443.
    The United States' failed effort to impose an East Asian-style, export-led industrial development regime on the Dominican Republic in the aftermath of the 1965 “Dominican crisis” poses two related empirical puzzles. First, why did the Dominicans reject the widely praised and ultimately rather successful East Asian model? And, second, how did the Dominicans overrule their erstwhile North American overlords? I answer the first question by underscoring the incompatibility of export-led industrialization and the island nation’s prevailing system of patrimonial rule. I (...)
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  4. Rewarding Regulation in Latin America.Andrew Schrank - 2013 - Politics and Society 41 (4):487-495.
    This article introduces the special issue on “Rewarding Regulation in Latin America” by explaining the origins and potential value of the concept. It pays particularly careful attention to the limits of both regulation, as traditionally practiced, and deregulation in developing democracies today. And it briefly describes the individual contributions to the issue and summarizes their broader lessons.
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  5.  19
    The Anatomy of Network Failure.Andrew Schrank & Josh Whitford - 2011 - Sociological Theory 29 (3):151-177.
    This article develops and defends a theory of "network failure" analogous to more familiar theories of organizational and market failure already prevalent in the literature on economic governance. It theorizes those failures not as the simple absence of network governance, but rather as a situation in which transactional conditions for network desirability obtain but network governance is impeded either by ignorance or opportunism, or by a combination of the two. It depicts network failures as continuous rather than discrete outcomes, shows (...)
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