4 found
Order:
  1.  28
    Who Rules the Ruler? On the Misconduct of Journal Editors.Aurora A. C. Teixeira & Mariana Fontes da Costa - 2010 - Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (2):111-128.
    There are very few (published) accounts of editorial misconduct, and those that do exist are almost exclusively focused on medicine-related areas. In the present article we detail a case of editorial misconduct in a rather underexplored domain, the social sciences. This case demonstrates that although legal systems provide different instruments of protection to avoid, compensate for, and punish misconduct on the part of journal editors, the social and economic power unbalance between authors and publishers suggests the importance of alternative solutions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  2.  22
    Sanding the Wheels of Growth: Cheating by Economics and Business Students and 'Real World' Corruption. [REVIEW]Aurora A. C. Teixeira - 2013 - Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (4):269-274.
    The relation between academic integrity and real world corruption is more often presumed than proven. Based on a sample of 7,602 students from 21 countries, it was found that academic cheating in the past is a predictor of the countries’ current level of corruption. This reproducibility and persistence over time of dishonest behaviors highlights the danger of disregarding students cheating at university.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  15
    Academic Misconduct in Portugal: Results From a Large Scale Survey to University Economics/Business Students.Aurora A. C. Teixeira & Maria de Fátima Oliveira Rocha - 2010 - Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (1):21-41.
  4.  34
    Academic Misconduct in Portugal: Results From a Large Scale Survey to University Economics/Business Students. [REVIEW]Aurora A. C. Teixeira & Maria Fátima Oliveira Rochdea - 2010 - Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (1):21-41.
    The phenomenon of cheating in higher education is of overwhelming importance in that the students engaging in these acts are unlikely to have the skills necessary for their future professional life. Despite its relevance, the empirical evaluation of cheating in universities has been almost exclusively focused on the US context. Little is known about cheating at the European level, let alone in Portugal. Even less is explored at the regional level. In this paper we present evidence on the perception of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations