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  1.  12
    Nanotechnology and Public Interest Dialogue: Some International Observations.Graeme A. Hodge & Diana M. Bowman - 2007 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 27 (2):118-132.
    This article examines nanotechnology within the context of the public interest. It notes that though nanotechnology research and development investment totalled US$9.6 billion in 2005, the public presently understands neither the implications nor how it might be best governed. The article maps a range of nanotechnology dialogue activities under way within the United Kingdom, the United States, Germany, and Australia. It explores the various approaches to articulating public interest matters and notes a shift in the way in which these governments, (...)
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  2.  9
    Are We Really the Prey? Nanotechnology as Science and Science Fiction.Peter Binks, Graeme A. Hodge & Diana M. Bowman - 2007 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 27 (6):435-445.
    Popular culture can play a significant role in shaping the acceptance of evolving technologies, with nanotechnology likely to be a case in point. The most popular fiction work to date in this arena has been Michael Crichton's techno-thriller Prey, which fuses together nanotechnology science with science fiction. Within the context of Prey, this article examines the role that scientists and popular culture play in educating society, and one another, about emerging technologies. In di ferentiating fact from fiction, the article reflects (...)
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  3.  53
    A big regulatory tool-box for a small technology.Diana M. Bowman & Graeme A. Hodge - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (2):193-207.
    There is little doubt that the development and commercialisation of nanotechnologies is challenging traditional state-based regulatory regimes. Yet governments currently appear to be taking a non-interventionist approach to directly regulating this emerging technology. This paper argues that a large regulatory toolbox is available for governing this small technology and that as nanotechnologies evolve, many regulatory advances are likely to occur outside of government. It notes the scientific uncertainties facing us as we contemplate nanotechnology regulatory matters and then examines the notion (...)
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  4.  38
    Editorial – governing nanotechnology: More than a small matter? [REVIEW]Diana M. Bowman & Graeme A. Hodge - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (3):239-241.
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