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  1.  16
    When Do Ethical Leaders Become Less Effective? The Moderating Role of Perceived Leader Ethical Conviction on Employee Discretionary Reactions to Ethical Leadership.Mayowa T. Babalola, Jeroen Stouten, Jeroen Camps & Martin Euwema - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (1):85-102.
    Drawing from the group engagement model and the moral conviction literature, we propose that perceived leader ethical conviction moderates the relationship between ethical leadership and employee OCB as well as deviance. In a field study of employees from various industries and a scenario-based experiment, we revealed that both the positive relation between ethical leadership and employee OCB and the negative relation between ethical leadership and employee deviance are more pronounced when leaders are perceived to have weak rather than strong ethical (...)
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  2. Frequent Change and Turnover Intention: The Moderating Role of Ethical Leadership.Mayowa T. Babalola, Jeroen Stouten & Martin Euwema - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (2):311-322.
    In a multi-source study, we examine how frequent change interacts with ethical leadership to reduce turnover intentions. We argue that ethical leaders enhance employees’ state self-esteem, which explains the moderating effect of ethical leadership. Results from 124 employee-coworker-supervisor triads revealed that ethical leadership moderated the relationship between frequent change and turnover intention such that the relationship was positive only when ethical leadership was low. The moderating relationship could be shown to be mediated by employees’ state self-esteem.
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  3.  22
    The Mind is Willing, but the Situation Constrains: Why and When Leader Conscientiousness Relates to Ethical Leadership.Mayowa T. Babalola, Michelle C. Bligh, Babatunde Ogunfowora, Liang Guo & Omale A. Garba - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (1):75-89.
    While previous research has established that employees who have a more conscientious leader are more likely to perceive that their leader is ethical, the underlying mechanisms and boundary conditions of this linkage remain unknown. In order to better understand the relationship between leader conscientiousness and ethical leadership, we examine the potential mediating role of leader moral reflectiveness, as well as the potential moderating role of decision-making autonomy. Drawing from social cognitive theory, results from two samples of workgroup leaders and their (...)
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  4.  4
    A Multilevel Analysis of the Relationship Between Ethical Leadership and Ostracism: The Roles of Relational Climate, Employee Mindfulness, and Work Unit Structure.Amanda Christensen-Salem, Fred O. Walumbwa, Mayowa T. Babalola, Liang Guo & Everlyne Misati - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 171 (3):619-638.
    Drawing on insights from social learning and social cognitive perspectives and research on the multilevel reality of leadership influences, we developed and tested a multilevel model that examines mechanisms and conditions through which ethical leadership deters work unit- and individual-level ostracism. Based on two field studies using multiple measurement points, we found that at the work unit level of analysis, relational climate partially mediates the negative relationship between ethical leadership and work unit-level ostracism whereas state mindfulness partially mediates the cross-level (...)
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  5.  4
    Correction to: Moral Burden of Bottom-Line Pursuits: How and When Perceptions of Top Management Bottom-Line Mentality Inhibit Supervisors’ Ethical Leadership Practices.Rebecca L. Greenbaum, Mayowa T. Babalola, Matthew J. Quade, Liang Guo & Yun Chung Kim - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (1):125-125.
    The name of the first author was incorrect in the initial online publication. The original article has been corrected.
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