33 found
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  1.  6
    Aspects of Freedom.Robert E. Wood - 1991 - Philosophy Today 35 (1):106-115.
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  2.  17
    Aesthetics: The Complementarity of, and Differences Between, John Dewey and Martin Heidegger.Robert E. Wood - 2013 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (2):245-266.
    In aesthetics and in philosophy generally, Dewey and Heidegger have many surprising convergences. Both find the contemporary world unsuitable for full human flourishing: Dewey because of the separation of art and religion from everyday life; Heidegger because of the disappearance of the sense of Mystery. Both go back to a time before the problems emerged. Both hold for the intentionality of consciousness, the bodily inhabitance of a common world having priority over a sovereign consciousness, the founding role of language in (...)
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  3.  8
    Being and Manifestness: Philosophy, Science, and Poetry in an Evolutionary Worldview.Robert E. Wood - 1995 - International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (4):437-447.
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  4.  10
    Buber's Conception of Philosophy.Robert E. Wood - 1978 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 53 (3):310-319.
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  5.  7
    Edith Stein: A Philosophical Prologue, 1913–1922. [REVIEW]Robert E. Wood - 2010 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (1):175-182.
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  6.  7
    Flatland: An Introduction to Metaphysical Thinking.Robert E. Wood - 1968 - Modern Schoolman 46 (1):1-9.
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  7.  7
    Five Bodies—and a Sixth: On the Place of Awareness in the Cosmos.Robert E. Wood - 2009 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (1):95-105.
    What one takes to be a body is identified initially as what is available to sensing. Sensing and reflecting are not so available. How one conceives of theirrelation admits of at least six possibilities exhibited in the history of philosophy: Hobbesian materialism, Berkleyan idealism, Platonic dualism of soul and body,Aristotelian hylomorphism, Cartesian dualism of thought and extension, and a Leibnizian-Whiteheadian view of psycho-physical co-implication. The latter viewredraws the conceptual map in a way most in keeping with experience as a whole (...)
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  8.  14
    High and Low in Nietzsche’s Zarathustra.Robert E. Wood - 2010 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (2):357-382.
    Contrary to wide-spread caricatures of Nietzsche, he has definite standards of value that are largely defensible, though on another basis than he provides. Thenadir is the Last Man; the zenith is the Overman. Contrary to the otherworldliness of Plato and the Christian tradition, Nietzsche demands fidelity to the earth anda love of the body. The modern virtue of truthfulness dissolved the tradition, but eventuated in the Last Man who lives in “wretched contentment.” The Overmanrequires organizing the chaos of one’s life (...)
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  9.  10
    Hegel: From Misunderstanding to the Beginning of Understanding.Robert E. Wood - 2012 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):337-349.
    Misunderstandings of Hegel have several roots: one is the intrinsic difficulty of his highly technical and interrelated conceptual sets, another is ideological opponents who consequently take statements out of context, and a third is following those of high stature who pass on the misunderstandings. Typical misunderstandings concern freedom and necessity, slavery, that status of the individual, God and the State, facts measuring up to concepts, the relation of rationality and actuality, the status of passion, and, above all, the nature of (...)
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  10.  6
    Hegel on the Heart.Robert E. Wood - 2001 - International Philosophical Quarterly 41 (2):131-144.
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  11.  11
    Kant’s “Antinomic” Aesthetics.Robert E. Wood - 2001 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 75 (2):271-295.
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  12.  14
    Martin Buber's Philosophy of the Word.Robert E. Wood - 1986 - Philosophy Today 30 (4):317-324.
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  13.  7
    Monasticism, Eternity, and the Heart: Hegel, Nietzsche, and Dostoevsky.Robert E. Wood - 2001 - Philosophy and Theology 13 (2):193-211.
    Hegel and Nietzsche stood opposed to the monastic tradition which they saw as based upon a denial of the intrinsic value of this life. Both sought to install eternity in this life and not seek for it in an afterlife. Central to both, and contrary to common caricatures of Hegel, is the notion of the heart, the aspect of total subjective participation, which is the locus of a fully concrete reason understood in Hegel’s sense. It is also central to Dostoevsky’s (...)
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  14.  11
    Martin Heidegger, Plato’s Sophist. [REVIEW]Robert E. Wood - 1999 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 73 (3):507-510.
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  15.  8
    Nietzsche and the Drama of Historiobiography. By Roberto Alejandro. [REVIEW]Robert E. Wood - 2014 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (3):591-595.
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  16.  7
    Philosophy, Aesthetics, and Theology: A Review of Hans Urs von Balthasar’s The Glory of the Lord. [REVIEW]Robert E. Wood - 1993 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 67 (3):355-382.
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  17. Placing Aesthetics: Reflections on the Philosophic Tradition.Robert E. Wood - 2000 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 63 (2):432-434.
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  18.  10
    Phenomenology of the Mailbox: Much Ado About Nothing.Robert E. Wood - 2003 - Philosophy Today 47 (2):147-159.
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  19.  10
    Questions of Platonism. [REVIEW]Robert E. Wood - 2002 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (2):348-350.
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  20.  8
    Recovery of the Aesthetic Center.Robert E. Wood - 1995 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 69:1-25.
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  21.  11
    Six Heideggerian Figures.Robert E. Wood - 1995 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 69 (2):311-331.
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  22.  9
    Spirit in Ashes: Hegel, Heidegger, and Man-Made Mass Death. By Edith Wyschogrod. [REVIEW]Robert E. Wood - 1989 - Modern Schoolman 66 (4):327-328.
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  23.  4
    Tactility: An Essay in Phenomenolgical Description.Robert E. Wood - 2000 - Southwest Philosophy Review 17 (1):19-26.
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  24.  9
    The Aesthetics of Natural Environments. [REVIEW]Robert E. Wood - 2005 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (2):345-349.
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  25.  6
    The Aesthetics of Thomas AquinasArt and Beauty in the Middle Ages. [REVIEW]Robert E. Wood - 1990 - Review of Metaphysics 43 (4):859-862.
    The organization of The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas is straightforward: after an initial chapter on aesthetics in medieval culture, Eco proceeds to the most general consideration of the transcendental character of beauty. He then moves to the aesthetic subject in a consideration of visio, then to the object in a consideration of the formal criteria of beauty. He follows that up with a chapter on "Concrete Problems and Applications," then goes on to the theory of art and the role of (...)
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  26.  13
    The Catholic Philosopher: Dancing at Arms’ Length with One’s Theological Mistress.Robert E. Wood - 1996 - Philosophy and Theology 9 (3/4):251-271.
    The article reflects on the need for an independent philosophy in relation to faith. After the assimilation of Plato and Aristotle, the official Church tended to attack attempts at independent philosophy as modes of unbelief. But it was precisely independent developments in modern thought that led to the transformation of the ordinary magisterium on certain key questions. Following von Balthasar, the article attempts to make Heidegger’s project our own: to think the ground of metaphysics, and thus of intellect and will, (...)
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  27.  6
    The Ethical Function of Architecture. [REVIEW]Robert E. Wood - 1999 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 73 (2):336-339.
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  28.  5
    The Future of Metaphysics.Robert E. Wood - 1972 - Philosophy East and West 22 (2):236-237.
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  29.  22
    The Free Spirit: Spinoza, Hegel, Nietzsche.Robert E. Wood - 2011 - International Philosophical Quarterly 51 (3):377-387.
    The free spirit is central to Spinoza, Hegel, and Nietzsche. Each of them sees it as linked to the recognition of necessity. They also see freedom in relation to the Totality: God or nature for Spinoza, absolute spirit for Hegel, and for Nietzsche the will to power operating within the eternal recurrence of the same. For all three—especially for Nietzsche who might seem to hold the opposite—the free condition is won through strenuous self-discipline. Further, all three deal with the notion (...)
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  30.  12
    The Heart: An Analysis of Human and Divine Affectivity. [REVIEW]Robert E. Wood - 2009 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (2):303-309.
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  31.  25
    The Notion of Being in Hegel and in Lonergan.Robert E. Wood - 2014 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (3):573-590.
    The notion of Being is central to Hegel as the beginning of the System and to Lonergan as what first arises in the mind. They both ask: how must the cosmos and human society be structured so that rational existence and flourishing are possible? Hegel claims to show the necessarily interlocking set of conditions. Logos-logic underpins the realms of Nature and Spirit that together limn the space of free individual existents. For Lonergan the notion of Being orients us toward the (...)
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  32.  12
    The Play of the Fourfolds: Plato and Heidegger.Robert E. Wood - 2010 - Philosophy Today 54 (3):219-228.
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  33.  4
    Weiss on Adumbration.Robert E. Wood - 1984 - Philosophy Today 28 (4):339-348.
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