Year:

  1.  13
    The Disciplinary Conception of Enlightenment in Kant’s Critical Philosophy.Farshid Baghai - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (2):130-152.
    Kant does not completely work out his philosophical conception of enlightenment. The definition of enlightenment that he offers in his well-known essay on the topic does not seem to completely match the definition that he puts forward later in his essay on the pantheism controversy and in the third Critique. It remains unclear how the two definitions relate to each other and whether and how they rest on the same principle. The lack of clarity in Kant’s conception of enlightenment is (...)
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  2.  6
    The Metaphysical Spectator and the Sphere of Social Life in Kant’s Political Writings.Alex Cain - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (2):153-166.
  3.  5
    1968 in an Expanded Field: The Frankfurt School and the Uneven Course of History.Martin Jay - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (2):89-105.
    ABSTRACTNo longer capable of serving as a nodal point of a single coherent narrative or as a marker for parallel events across national borders, “1968” is best understood in a tense relation to “1967”. Juxtaposed rather than reconciled, they can only be brought together in a dynamic field of conflicting forces still in play even after a half century has passed. Such an approach alerts us to the relativization of what seems to be a punctual moment in a single historical (...)
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  4.  6
    Kant on the Imagination: Fanciful and Unruly, or “an Indispensable Dimension of the Human Soul”.John Rundell - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (2):106-129.
    ABSTRACTKant is concerned to give meaning, depth and veracity to the notion of the subject, which he does on transcendental grounds, and also to shift it beyond purely cognitivist formulations. He opens the subject up to other dimensions of the world that he or she establishes – not only the cognitive, but also the political – ethical and the aesthetic. He does this by constructing and denoting different faculties and their principles that ought to be employed in the distinct domains (...)
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  5.  2
    In the Crosshairs of the Fourfold: Critical Thoughts on Aleksandr Dugin’s Heidegger.Matthew Sharpe - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (2):167-187.
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  6.  1
    Adorno, Foucault and the Critique of the West: By Deborah Cook, London, Verso, 2018, 180 P., £19.99/$29.95/$39.95can (Hardback), ISBN 978-1-78873-082-2.Antoine Athanassiadis - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):85-88.
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  7.  6
    A Method of Mobility: Dialectical Critique and the Work of Concepts.Rodrigo Cordero - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):1-16.
    ABSTRACTThis article discusses dialectics as a method of critique which takes concepts it primal object of inquiry. Through a reading of Theodor W. Adorno’s lecture course Introduction to Dialectics, it argues that for dialectical critique concepts are living organs of social reality whose work must observed in terms of constellations of experiences and practices, and through specific historical sites and social processes. The article reconstructs three moments in Adorno’s thinking of critique’s relation to conceptuality: the “pedagogical effect” of concepts on (...)
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  8.  3
    Critique as Social Practice. Critical Theory and Social Self-Understanding: By Robin Celikates, Translated by Naomi van Steenbergen, London and New York, Rowman and Littlefield, 2018, 238 Pp., £80.00 (Hardback), £24.95 (Paperback), ISBN: 978-178660-462-0.Jean-Philippe Deranty - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):80-85.
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  9.  9
    Althusser, Feuerbach and the Non-Identical Concept of the Body.Michael Hauser - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):49-62.
    ABSTRACTThis article begins with a detailed analysis of Althusser's criticism of Feuerbach as an “ideologue” of the body. Althusser concentrates on the mirror structure of the subject and the object and on empiricism, which represents the ideological discourse. I argue that Althusser overlooked Feuerbach's decisive revelations: a bodily materiality which corresponds to Adorno's non-identical inner nature, and the ontological condensation of the human being; a process which generates the “living reality” of the body. I show Feuerbach's breakthrough reinterpretation of the (...)
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  10.  83
    Levinas Between Recognition and Heterology.Terence Holden - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):17-33.
    ABSTRACTI extract a problematic from Levinas’ shifting attitude towards the idea of recognition. An underappreciated aspect of Levinas’ work is that at an early stage he appeals to a recognition-based model of intersubjectivity, which characteristically plots a relation of mutual affirmation between individuals. However, he later explicitly rejects this paradigm in favour of an intensified heterological orientation which invests in otherness as a value in itself. Levinas’ rejection of recognition raises the question of how we are to interpret the relation (...)
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  11.  5
    Claudia Leeb’s The Politics of Repressed Guilt: The Tragedy of Austrian Silence with David W. McIvor, Lars Rensmann, and Claudia Leeb.Claudia Leeb, David W. McIvor & Lars Rensmann - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):63-79.
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  12.  4
    Beyond Redistribution: Honneth, Recognition Theory and Global Justice.Renante D. Pilapil - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):34-48.
    ABSTRACTThis paper attempts to explore the ways through which the discourse on global justice can be expanded beyond the language of redistribution by utilizing the insights from the theory of recognition as proposed by Honneth. It looks into the potential contributions of recognition theory in the normative analysis of global poverty and inequality. Taking off from the argument that the focus on global redistributive justice is misleading, the paper makes three claims: firstly, any global justice discourse must take as its (...)
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