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  1. Ideology, Critique, and Social Structures.Matteo Bianchin - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (2):184-196.
    On Jaeggi’s reading, the immanent and progressive features of ideology critique are rooted in the connection between its explanatory and its normative tasks. I argue that this claim can be cashed out in terms of the mechanisms involved in a functional explanation of ideology and that stability plays a crucial role in this connection. On this reading, beliefs can be said to be ideological if (a) they have the function of supporting existing social practices, (b) they are the output of (...)
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  2.  9
    Situating Rahel Jaeggi in the Contemporary Frankfurt Critical Theory.Giorgio Fazio - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (2):116-127.
    ABSTRACT This article aims to show how the originality of Jaeggi’s contribution to recent debates in critical theory clearly emerges if one compares her approach with what in many ways represents its antecedent and constant point of reference: namely, the critical theory of Axel Honneth. This comparison offers a privileged way of grasping the advantages of Jaeggi’s approach with respect to that of Honneth. At the same time, reversing perspective, it permits us to focus on some open problems in Jaeggi’s (...)
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  3.  8
    Capitalism and the Nature of Life-Forms.Federica Gregoratto - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (2):150-161.
    ABSTRACT The article critically discusses Rahel Jaeggi’s recent philosophical contribution to a critical theory of capitalism. The first part reconstructs Jaeggi’s account of Lebensform, life-form, that builds up the main ontological framework for addressing and problematizing capitalism intended not as an economic system but as a social whole. The second part focuses on the three different theoretical strategies that Jaeggi puts forward to detect and deal with capitalism’s immanent flaws. The third and last part problematizes the metaphysical assumptions and implications (...)
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  4.  5
    Rejoinder.Rahel Jaeggi - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (2):197-231.
    ABSTRACT A rejoinder to comments by Marco Solinas, Giorgio Fazio, Alessandro Pinzani, Italo Testa, Federica Gregoratto, Leonardo Marchettoni and Matteo Bianchin in this Special Issue of Critical Horizons.
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  5.  7
    Practices, Conventions, Problems.Leonardo Marchettoni - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (2):174-183.
    ABSTRACT This paper aims at examining the way in which Rahel Jaeggi’s conception of forms of life as inert bundles of practices is connected to the problem of the possibility of an immanent critique of life forms, that is, of a kind of analysis that is both internal and transformative. In the first part, my contention will be that understanding practices in terms of conventions makes it difficult to admit of internal criticisms of them. Jaeggi’s account of immanent critique, as (...)
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  6. Critique of Forms of Life or Critique of Pervasive Doctrines?Alessandro Pinzani - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (2):140-149.
    ABSTRACT The paper critically evaluates Rahel Jaeggi’s concept of form of life. Particularly, it deals with the question of why one should want to criticize forms of life or society in the first place. While Jaeggi mentions issues of rationality and success, the paper refers to issues of suffering. Therefore, it introduces firstly the concept of pervasive doctrine, which aims at complementing, not at substituting, Jaeggi’s concept of form of life. A pervasive doctrine is composed by a coherent system of (...)
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  7.  8
    The Political Deficit of Immanent Critique. On Jaeggi's Objections to Walzer's Criticism.Marco Solinas - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (2):128-139.
    ABSTRACT The paper aims to show that Rahel Jaeggi's objections to Walzer's model of internal critique are in many respects inconsistent, and above all that these objections are a sign of a political deficit in the neo-Hegelian methodology adopted by Jaeggi to develop her model of immanent critique. The same deficit concerns Jaeggi's use of Marx's model of the critique of ideology, which can be fruitfully reworked by Walzer's reinterpretation of Gramsci's theory of the struggle for hegemony.
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  8. How Are Bundles of Social Practices Constituted? Jaeggi, Social Ontology, and the Jargon of Normativity.Italo Testa - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (2):162-173.
    ABSTRACT In this paper, I analyse Rahel Jaeggi’s socio-ontological account of forms of life. I show that her framework is a two-sided one, since it involves an understanding of forms of life both as inert bundles of practices and as having a normative structure. Here I argue that this approach is based on an a priori argument which assumes normativity as the condition of intelligibility of social criticism. I show that the intimate tension between these two sides is reflected in (...)
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  9.  1
    Immanent Critique of Capitalism as a Form of Life: On Rahel Jaeggi’s Critical Theory.Italo Testa & Marco Solinas - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (2):111-115.
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  10.  11
    Recognition as a Philosophical Practice: From “Warring” Attitudes to Cooperative Projects.Miriam Bankovsky - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (1):29-55.
    ABSTRACT What does it mean to practice a theory of recognition within the discipline of philosophy? Across an initially acrimonious French-German divide, Axel Honneth’s effort to recognise the value of contemporary French philosophy and social theory suggests that philosophy is a self-critical, outwardly oriented, and cooperative discipline. First, mobilising the idea of recognition in his own philosophical practise has permitted Honneth to notice non-deliberative aspects of social interaction that Habermas had overlooked, including the need for self-confidence and the need for (...)
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  11.  6
    Recognition Beyond French-German Divides: Engaging Axel Honneth.Miriam Bankovsky & Danielle Petherbridge - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (1):1-4.
    ABSTRACT What does it mean to practice a theory of recognition within the discipline of philosophy? Across an initially acrimonious French-German divide, Axel Honneth’s effort to recognise the value of contemporary French philosophy and social theory suggests that philosophy is a self-critical, outwardly oriented, and cooperative discipline. First, mobilising the idea of recognition in his own philosophical practise has permitted Honneth to notice non-deliberative aspects of social interaction that Habermas had overlooked, including the need for self-confidence and the need for (...)
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  12.  5
    An “Enchanted” or a “Fragmented” Social World? Recognition and Domination in Honneth and Bourdieu.Louis Carré - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (1):89-109.
    ABSTRACT Current debates on recognition and domination tend to be characterized by two polarized positions. Where the “anti-recognition” camp views recognition as a tool for establishing and reproducing relations of power, the “pro-recognition” camp conceives it as a way for dominated individuals and social groups to lay stake to intersubjective relations that are more just. At first glance, Honneth’s normative theory of recognition and Bourdieu’s critical sociology of domination also divide along these lines. Honneth takes the pro-recognition stance, criticizing the (...)
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  13.  20
    The Norm, the Normal and the Pathological: Articulating Honneth's Account of Normativity with a French Philosophy of the Norm.Katia Genel - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (1):70-88.
    ABSTRACT Axel Honneth deploys the categories of normal and pathological to explain contemporary society in organic terms. This article concerns itself with how these medical references function in Honneth's work to explain the social world, and what their political implications are. For Honneth, social normality is a normative resource, even if it is only accessible through the study of pathology. Socially accepted norms are taken to reflect legitimate principles, with the early Honneth taking pathology as an individual psychic suffering that (...)
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  14.  14
    Misrecognising Recognition. Foundations of a Critical Theory of Recognition.Steffen Herrmann - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (1):56-69.
    ABSTRACT According to Max Horkheimer, a critical theory of society has to fulfil two tasks: the elimination of social injustice and the critical reflection of its own conceptual means. Based on this definition, I argue that Axel Honneth’s critical theory of recognition is at risk of losing sight of the ambivalence of recognition which limits the scope of his analysis of social pathologies. By drawing on the concept of misrecognising recognition it can be shown that recognition itself is an ambivalent (...)
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  15.  9
    Recognition Across French-German Divides: The Social Fabric of Freedom in French Theory.Axel Honneth & Miriam Bankovsky - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (1):5-28.
    ABSTRACT In his recent book, Recognition: A Chapter in the History of European ideas, Honneth has explained how he understands the French concept of recognition. This article places Honneth's latest interpretation in the context of his long-standing and evolving engagement with French theory over several decades. Honneth acknowledges his significant debt to a French tendency to view recognition as a problem for self-realisation. Bourdieu's and Boltanski's account of how ambitions become limited by the availability of capital and the internalisation of (...)
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