10 found

Year:

  1. Wild Swimming Methodologies for Decolonial Feminist Justice-to-Come Scholarship.Vivienne Bozalek & Tamara Shefer - 2022 - Feminist Review 130 (1):26-43.
    This article thinks with oceans and swimming, in dialogue with decolonial feminist materialist approaches and other current novel methodologies which foreground embodiment and relational ontologies, in order to consider the conceptual potential of such diffractions for the project of alternative scholarly practices. We focus on swimming in the sea as one form of wild methodology and Slow scholarship that draws on hauntology to think about the possibilities of such methodologies for troubling normative academic practices directed at different ways of being (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. Thinking-with Decorator Crabs: Oceanic Feminism and Material Remediation in the Multispecies Aquarium.Elizabeth Burmann & Jianni Tien - 2022 - Feminist Review 130 (1):78-96.
    Feminist scholarship has increasingly turned towards the ocean as a conceptual apparatus in which to think through the complex philosophical and ethical dilemmas of the Anthropocene. Responding to the ebbs, flows and transformations of the oceanic turn, our article outlines our interactions with four decorator crabs. It begins by situating our experience of thinking-with these crabs as a feminist practice of care within the conceptual context of the ocean. Our article then draws on the knowledge that arose out of our (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Frequencies.Melisa Ertuğrul - 2022 - Feminist Review 130 (1):108-108.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. Watery Archives: Transoceanic Narratives in Andil Gosine’s Our Holy Waters, and Mine.Subhalakshmi Gooptu - 2022 - Feminist Review 130 (1):44-60.
    In this article, I describe Andil Gosine’s artistic archives as ‘watery’ to chart a feminist genealogy of archival practice. I argue that routing interdisciplinary studies of Atlantic and Indian Oceans through the Caribbean provides a transoceanic method to analyse race and sexuality within Indo-Caribbean connections. To that end, I examine the representation of water and waterways in Gosine’s Our Holy Waters, and Mine to illustrate how relations with water provides a heuristic and representative practice for critiquing afterlives of colonialism and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Ocean Weaves: Reconfigurations of Climate Justice in Oceania.Jaimey Hamilton Faris - 2022 - Feminist Review 130 (1):5-25.
    This article engages weaving as a model of feminist decolonial climate justice methodology in Oceania. In particular, it looks to three weaver-activists who use their practices to reclaim the matrixial power of the ocean in the face of ongoing US occupation in the Pacific: Marshallese poet and climate activist Kathy Jetn̄il-Kijiner; Hawai‘i-based settler-ally weaver and installation artist Mary Babcock; and Kānaka Maoli sculptor Kaili Chun, also based in Hawai‘i. Each artist begins from a particular positionality in the ongoing open weave (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. Hope at the End of the World: Lessons From the Ocean.Katja Holtz - 2022 - Feminist Review 130 (1):102-107.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Waves of Sisterhood.Basma Lahbib - 2022 - Feminist Review 130 (1):109-114.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. Oceans.Joanna Pares Hoare, Irene Gedalof & Gina Heathcote - 2022 - Feminist Review 130 (1):1-4.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  1
    Uncanny Waters.Caroline Emily Rae - 2022 - Feminist Review 130 (1):61-77.
    In this article, I argue for the notion of what I term ‘uncanny water’ as a conceptual tool for reading contemporary oceanic fictions. The uncanny’s affective capacity to destabilise epistemological and ontological certainties makes it a particularly potent literary tool for challenging the nature/culture binary. I argue that fictions which actively defamiliarise the ocean can be used to redress the anthropocentric privilege found in hitherto narratives of the oceanic that were predicated upon mastery and control, and that uncanny moments of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. Submersive Mermaid Tales: Speculative Storytelling for Oceanic Futures.Celina Stifjell - 2022 - Feminist Review 130 (1):97-101.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues