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Summary

Philosophers working on the emotions are interested in answering the following kinds of questions:

What are emotions? Are they thoughts, feelings, perceptual or quasi-perceptual states, or something else? Or perhaps they are combination of all these things? Do emotions form a natural class? Are emotions natural kinds? Are emotions in some sense ‘socially constructed’?

What emotions are there? Is love an emotion? How about Schadenfreude? Are moods emotions? What about so-called moral or aesthetic or religious emotions? Are these emotions proper? Again, how are different emotions to be characterized? What distinguishes them from one another?

What is the relationship between emotion and reason? Can emotions be evaluated for their rationality? Or are emotions non-rational mental states? Do we need emotions in order to be ‘rational’?

Closely related to the last few questions, what is the nature of the relationship between emotion and morality? Are emotions needed to have insight into the evaluate realm? Can a person who lacks certain emotional capacities be a moral agent? How might emotion be important for understanding character, vice and virtue? How might emotion be a hindrance to morality?

Each of the emotion subcategories contains details of work on the emotions that is devoted to answering and shedding light on the above sorts of questions, along with many others.

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  1. The Evolution of Human Vocal Emotion.Gregory A. Bryant - forthcoming - Emotion Review:175407392093079.
    Vocal affect is a subcomponent of emotion programs that coordinate a variety of physiological and psychological systems. Emotional vocalizations comprise a suite of vocal behaviors shaped by evolution to solve adaptive social communication problems. The acoustic forms of vocal emotions are often explicable with reference to the communicative functions they serve. An adaptationist approach to vocal emotions requires that we distinguish between evolved signals and byproduct cues, and understand vocal affect as a collection of multiple strategic communicative systems subject to (...)
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  2. Darwin and the Situation of Emotion Research.Daniel M. Gross & Stephanie D. Preston - forthcoming - Emotion Review:175407392093080.
    This article demonstrates how researchers from both the sciences and the humanities can learn from Charles Darwin’s mixed methodology. We identify two basic challenges that face emotion research in the sciences, namely a mismatch between experiment design and the complexity of life that we aim to explain, and problematic efforts to bridge the gap, including invalid inferences from constrained study designs, and equivocal use of terms like “sympathy” and “empathy” that poorly reflect such methodological constraints. We argue that Darwin’s mixed (...)
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  3. Support Vector Machines and Affective Science.Chris H. Miller, Matthew D. Sacchet & Ian H. Gotlib - forthcoming - Emotion Review:175407392093078.
    Support vector machines are being used increasingly in affective science as a data-driven classification method and feature reduction technique. Whereas traditional statistical methods typically compare group averages on selected variables, SVMs use a predictive algorithm to learn multivariate patterns that optimally discriminate between groups. In this review, we provide a framework for understanding the methods of SVM-based analyses and summarize the findings of seminal studies that use SVMs for classification or data reduction in the behavioral and neural study of emotion (...)
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  4. Self-Esteem, Social Esteem, and Pride.Alessandro Salice - forthcoming - Emotion Review:175407392093078.
    This article explores self-esteem as an episodic self-conscious emotion. Episodic self-esteem is first distinguished from trait self-esteem, which is described as an enduring state related to the subject’s sense of self-worth. Episodic self-esteem is further compared with pride by claiming that the two attitudes differ in crucial respects. Importantly, episodic self-esteem—but not pride—is a function of social esteem: in episodic self-esteem, the subject evaluates herself in the same way in which others evaluate her. Furthermore, social esteem elicits episodic self-esteem if (...)
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  5. The Unavoidable Intentionality of Affect: The History of Emotions and the Neurosciences of the Present Day.William M. Reddy - forthcoming - Emotion Review:175407392093078.
    The “problem of emotions,” that is, that many of them are both meaningful and corporeal, has yet to be resolved. Western thinkers, from Augustine to Descartes to Zajonc, have handled this problem by employing various forms of mind–body dualism. Some psychologists and neuroscientists since the 1970s have avoided it by talking about cognitive and emotional “processing,” using a terminology borrowed from computer science that nullifies the meaningful or intentional character of both thought and emotion. Outside the Western-influenced contexts, emotion and (...)
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  6. Emotions in Sport and Games.Alfred Archer & Nathan Wildman (eds.) - forthcoming - Routledge.
    Emotions play an important role in both sport and games, from the pride and joy of victory, the misery and shame of defeat, and the anger and anxiety felt along the way. This volume brings together experts in the philosophy of sport and games and experts in the philosophy of emotion to investigate this important area of research. The book discusses the role of the emotions for both participants and spectators of sports and games, including detailed discussions of suffering, shame, (...)
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  7. Shame, Vulnerability and Philosophical Thinking.Sigridur Thorgeirsdottir - 2020 - Sophia 59 (1):5-17.
    Shame in the deep sense of fear of exposure of human vulnerability has been identified as one mood or disposition of philosophical thinking. Philosophical imaginary, disciplinary identity and misogynistic vocabulary testify to a collective, underlying, unprocessed shame inherent to the philosophical tradition like Le Doeuff, Butler and Murphy have pointed out. One aspect of collective philosophical shame has to do with disgust of or denial of embodiment insofar as it poses a threat to ideals of sovereignty and rationality. Embodiment reveals (...)
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  8. Comment: Developing and Maintaining High-Quality Relationships Via Emotion.Sara B. Algoe - forthcoming - Emotion Review.
    This comment addresses opportunities for understanding the social functions of emotion by taking a developmental perspective. I agree that understanding emotions and their development will meaningf...
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  9. Comment: Historians in the Emotion Laboratory.Otniel E. Dror - forthcoming - Emotion Review.
    In this comment, I indicate several challenges and opportunities—out of the many—for an integrated science–humanities approach to emotions, from the perspective of a historian of the modern science...
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  10. How Safe Should We Feel? On the Ethics of Fear in the Public Sphere.Sabine Döring - 2020 - In Sebastian Schmidt & Gerhard Ernst (eds.), The Ethics of Belief and Beyond. Understanding Mental Normativity. Abingdon: Routledge. pp. 215-233.
    The question is why it is that objective safety level and subjective feeling of safety may come apart. Answering this question requires an analysis of the nature of fear in the public sphere since feeling safe means to feel that one avoids the frightening, i.e. the threats or dangers that one perceives in the world. Döring argues that the fact-resistance fear might display in the public sphere is due to the characteristic function that fear fulfills in this sphere. In the (...)
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  11. Review of ‘Strong Feelings: Emotion, Addiction, and Human Behaviour’, by J. Elster. [REVIEW]Louis C. Charland - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):108-110.
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  12. Emotion.Louis C. Charland & R. M. Gordon - 2005 - In Donald Borchert (ed.), Encyclopaedia of Philosophy (Vol. 2) (2nd Edition). pp. 197-203.
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  13. Emotion: Philosophical Issues.Louis C. Charland - 2009 - In Tim Bayne, Axel Cleeremans & Patrick Wilken (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Consciousness. Oxford, UK: pp. 259-262.
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  14. Ethical Issues (in Affective Science Research).Louis C. Charland - 2009 - In David Sanders & Klaus Scherer (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Emotion and Affective Sciences. Oxford, UK: pp. 157-158.
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  15. Qualia.Louis C. Charland - 2009 - In David Sanders & Klaus Scherer (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Emotion and Affective Sciences. Oxford, UK: pp. 327.
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  16. Affect (Philosophical Perspective).Louis C. Charland - 2009 - In David Sanders & Klaus Scherer (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Emotion and Affective Sciences. Oxford, UK: pp. 9-10.
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  17. Alexander Crichton on the Psychopathology of the Passions.Louis C. Charland - 2008 - History of Psychiatry 19 (3):275-296.
    Alexander Crichton (1763—1856) made significant contributions to the medical theory of the passions, yet there exists no systematic exegesis of this particular aspect of his work. The present article explores four themes in Crichton's work on the passions: (1) the role of irritability in the physiology of the passions; (2) the manner in which irritability and sensibility contribute to the valence, or polarity, of the passions; (3) the elaboration of a psychopathology of the passions that emphasizes their physiological form rather (...)
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  18. Procesarea emoțiilor.Nicolae Sfetcu - manuscript
    Emoția este combinația dintre un proces de evaluare mentală și răspunsuri la acest proces. Dar nu toate emoțiile generează sentimente, și nu toate sentimentele își au originea în emoții. Emoția și sentimentul se bazează astfel pe două procese de bază, vizualizarea unei anumite stări corporale juxtapuse la colectarea semnalelor de declanșare și de stimulare a mușchilor, și un proces cognitiv care însoțește evenimentele respective dar care funcționează în paralel. DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.21890.22723.
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  19. Religiöse Erfahrung zwischen Emotion und Kognition: William James' Karl Girgensohns, Rudolf Ottos und Carl Gustav Jungs Psychologie des religiösen Erleben.Józef Bremer - 2006 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 11:300-303.
  20. Happy Self-Surrender and Unhappy Self-Assertion: A Comparison Between Admiration and Emulative Envy.Sara Protasi - 2019 - In Alfred Archer & Andre Grahlé (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Admiration. New York: Rowman & Little International. pp. 45-60.
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  21. Bienvenida Ternura. Emoción y Narración en la Nueva Serialidad Televisiva.Irene Martínez Marín - 2018 - In Alberto Nahum García Martínez & María J. Ortiz (eds.), Cine y series. pp. 217-232.
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  22. Emotions in Cultural Dynamics.Yulia Chentsova-Dutton - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (2):47-47.
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  23. Using Models to Predict Cultural Evolution From Emotional Selection Mechanisms.Kimmo Eriksson & Pontus Strimling - 2019 - Emotion Review 12 (2):79-92.
    Cultural variants may spread by being more appealing, more memorable, or less offensive than other cultural variants. Empirical studies suggest that such “emotional selection” is a force to be reckoned with in cultural evolution. We present a research paradigm that is suitable for the study of emotional selection. It guides empirical research by directing attention to the circumstances under which emotions influence the likelihood that an individual will influence another individual to acquire a cultural variant. We present a modeling framework (...)
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  24. Mapping Dynamic Interactions Among Cognitive Biases in Depression.Jonas Everaert, Amit Bernstein, Jutta Joormann & Ernst H. W. Koster - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (2):93-110.
    Depression is theorized to be caused in part by biased cognitive processing of emotional information. Yet, prior research has adopted a reductionist approach that does not characterize how biases i...
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  25. Why Do People With Depression Use Faulty Emotion Regulation Strategies?Sunkyung Yoon & Jonathan Rottenberg - 2019 - Emotion Review 12 (2):118-128.
    Why do people with psychopathology use less adaptive and more maladaptive strategies for negative emotions if such usage has self-destructive consequences? Although researchers have examined the reasons for people’s engagement in maladaptive “behaviors,” such as nonsuicidal self-injury, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the reasons why people might endorse maladaptive emotion regulation strategies. This article addresses this question, focusing on the case of depression, evaluating an array of 10 possible explanations. After considering the existing evidence, we provide a blueprint (...)
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  26. What Evokes Being Moved?Eric Cullhed - 2019 - Emotion Review 12 (2):111-117.
    Recent attempts to define being moved have difficulties agreeing on its eliciting conditions. The status quaestionis is often summarized as a question of whether the emotion is evoked by exemplifications of a wide range of positive core values or a more restricted set of values associated with attachment. This conclusion is premature. Study participants associate being moved with interactions with their loved ones not merely for what they exemplify but also for their affective bond to them. Being moved is elicited (...)
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  27. Emotions at the Service of Cultural Construction.Bernard Rimé - 2019 - Emotion Review 12 (2):65-78.
    Emotions signal flaws in the person’s anticipation systems, or in other words, in aspects of models of how the world works. As these models are essentially shared in society, emotional challenges e...
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  28. Emotion in Cultural Dynamics.Yoshihisa Kashima, Alin Coman, Janet V. T. Pauketat & Vincent Yzerbyt - 2019 - Emotion Review 12 (2):48-64.
    Emotion is critical for cultural dynamics, that is, for the formation, maintenance, and transformation of culture over time. We outline the component micro- and macro-level processes of cultural dynamics, and argue that emotion not only facilitates the transmission and retention of cultural information, but also is shaped and crafted by cultural dynamics. Central to this argument is our understanding of emotion as a complete information package that signals the adaptive significance of the information that the agent is processing. It captures (...)
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  29. Comment: Emotions Are Abstract, Conceptual Categories That Are Learned by a Predicting Brain.Katie Hoemann, Madeleine Devlin & Lisa Feldman Barrett - forthcoming - Emotion Review.
    In their review, Ruba and Repacholi summarize the methods used to assess preverbal infants’ understanding of emotions, and analyze the existing evidence in light of classical and constructionist ac...
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  30. Cross-Cultural Emotion Recognition and In-Group Advantage in Vocal Expression: A Meta-Analysis.Petri Laukka & Hillary Anger Elfenbein - forthcoming - Emotion Review.
    Most research on cross-cultural emotion recognition has focused on facial expressions. To integrate the body of evidence on vocal expression, we present a meta-analysis of 37 cross-cultural studies...
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  31. Comment: A Role of Language in Infant Emotion Concept Acquisition.Holly Shablack, Andrea G. Stein & Kristen A. Lindquist - forthcoming - Emotion Review.
    Ruba and Repacholi review an important debate in the emotion development literature: whether infants can perceive and understand facial configurations as instances of discrete emotion catego...
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  32. Comment: Measuring Guilty and Grateful Behaviors in Children and Adults.Jo-Ann Tsang - forthcoming - Emotion Review.
    This comment explores the use of behavioral measures in the developmental study of guilt and gratitude reviewed by Vaish and Hepach. Although the use of behavioral measures in developmental...
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  33. The Odor of Disgust: Contemplating the Dark Side of 20th-Century Cancer History.Bettina Hitzer - forthcoming - Emotion Review.
    This article explores how historians of emotions and historians of the senses can collaborate to write a history of emotional experience that takes seriously the corporeality of emotions. It invest...
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  34. Comment on “A Relational Framework for Integrating the Study of Empathy in Children and Adults”: A Conversation Analytic Perspective.Maxi Kupetz - forthcoming - Emotion Review.
    This comment on Main and Kho’s suggestion for “a relational framework for integrating the study of empathy in children and adults” takes a conversation analytic perspective. First, I will su...
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  35. A Collective Emotion in Medieval Italy: The Flagellant Movement of 1260.Piroska Nagy & Xavier Biron-Ouellet - forthcoming - Emotion Review.
    The purpose of this article is to open a dialogue between research in social sciences concerning collective emotion and historical investigation concerning a religious and political movement of the...
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  36. Comment: Mapping Neutrality Within the Affective Landscape: A Response to Yih, Uusberg, Qian, and Gross.Karen Gasper & Danfei Hu - 2019 - Emotion Review 12 (1):39-40.
    Yih, Uusberg, Qian, and Gross proposed an appraisal approach to help conceptualize five different states that researchers have used as neutral control conditions. This approach has the poten...
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  37. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Association Between Complexity of Emotion Experience and Behavioral Adaptation.Mia S. O’Toole, Megan E. Renna, Emma Elkjær, Mai B. Mikkelsen & Douglas S. Mennin - 2019 - Emotion Review 12 (1):23-38.
    This article systematically reviews studies investigating the effect of three operationalizations of complexity in emotion experience on situat...
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  38. Author Reply: An Appraisal Perspective on Neutral Affective States.Jennifer Yih, Andero Uusberg, Weiqiang Qian & James J. Gross - 2019 - Emotion Review 12 (1):41-43.
    We applaud Gasper for reviewing five approaches to operationalizing neutral states. To supplement Gasper’s important contribution, we express the five neutral conditions at the appraisal lev...
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  39. Envy: An Adversarial Review and Comparison of Two Competing Views.Jan Crusius, Manuel F. Gonzalez, Jens Lange & Yochi Cohen-Charash - 2019 - Emotion Review 12 (1):3-21.
    The nature of envy has recently been the subject of a heated debate. Some researchers see envy as a complex, yet unitary construct that despite being hostile in nature can lead to both hostile and...
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  40. New Section: Perspectives on Mental Health.Yulia Chentsova Dutton, W. Gerrod Parrott & Jonathan Rottenberg - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (1):22-22.
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  41. Changing Hearts: Performing Jesuit Emotions Between Europe, Asia, and the Americas (Jesuit Studies: Modernity Through the Prism of Jesuit History. Vol. 15). Pp. Xxii, 305, Edited by Yasmin Haskell and Raphael Garrod. Leiden/London, Brill, 2018, £120.86. [REVIEW]John J. LaRocca - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):527-528.
  42. Art, Empathy and the Divine.Dan O’Brien - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):412-423.
  43. A Review on Five Recent and Near-Future Developments in Computational Processing of Emotion in the Human Voice.Dagmar M. Schuller & Björn W. Schuller - forthcoming - Emotion Review:175407391989852.
    We provide a short review on the recent and near-future developments of computational processing of emotion in the voice, highlighting self-learning of representations moving continuously away from traditional expert-crafted or brute-forced feature representations to end-to-end learning, a movement towards the coupling of analysis and synthesis of emotional voices to foster better mutual understanding, weakly supervised learning at a large scale, transfer learning from related domains such as speech recognition or cross-modal transfer learning, and reinforced learning through interactive applications at a (...)
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  44. Brain Networks of Emotional Prosody Processing.Didier Grandjean - forthcoming - Emotion Review:175407391989852.
    The processing of emotional nonlinguistic information in speech is defined as emotional prosody. This auditory nonlinguistic information is essential in the decoding of social interactions and in our capacity to adapt and react adequately by taking into account contextual information. An integrated model is proposed at the functional and brain levels, encompassing 5 main systems that involve cortical and subcortical neural networks relevant for the processing of emotional prosody in its major dimensions, including perception and sound organization; related action tendencies; (...)
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  45. The Virtue of Curiosity.Lewis Ross - 2020 - Episteme 17 (1):105-120.
    ABSTRACTA thriving project in contemporary epistemology concerns identifying and explicating the epistemic virtues. Although there is little sustained argument for this claim, a number of prominent sources suggest that curiosity is an epistemic virtue. In this paper, I provide an account of the virtue of curiosity. After arguing that virtuous curiosity must be appropriately discerning, timely and exacting, I then situate my account in relation to two broader questions for virtue responsibilists: What sort of motivations are required for epistemic virtue? (...)
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  46. On Stories Within and Stories Behind Symptoms: Response to Colombetti and Stein.Gerrit Glas - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (1):57-58.
    I thank Giovanna Colombetti and Dan Stein for their careful reading and thoughtful comments.Colombetti is right when she suggests that in enactivism there are no 'mere physiological states.' She criticizes the following quotation: "If there is no self-referentiality, even after attempts at clarification, the putative emotion is just a physiological state or a sensation." My formulation, she says, echoes traditional, disembodied cognitivist accounts of emotion, according to which bodily arousal and bodily sensation, without accompanying intentional evaluations and judgments, are mere (...)
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  47. Engineering Affect: Emotion Regulation, the Internet, and the Techno-Social Niche.Joel Krueger & Lucy Osler - 2019 - Philosophical Topics 47 (2):1-53.
    Philosophical work exploring the relation between cognition and the Internet is now an active area of research. Some adopt an externalist framework, arguing that the Internet should be seen as environmental scaffolding that drives and shapes cognition. However, despite growing interest in this topic, little attention has been paid to how the Internet influences our affective life — our moods, emotions, and our ability to regulate these and other feeling states. We argue that the Internet scaffolds not only cognition but (...)
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  48. Fact and Value in Emotion.Louis C. Charland & Peter Zachar (eds.) - 2008 - John Benjamins.
    There is a large amount of scientific work on emotion in psychology, neuroscience, biology, physiology, and psychiatry, which assumes that it is possible to study emotions and other affective states, objectively. Emotion science of this sort is concerned primarily with 'facts' and not 'values', with 'description' not 'prescription'. The assumption behind this vision of emotion science is that it is possible to distinguish factual from evaluative aspects of affectivity and emotion, and study one without the other. But what really is (...)
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  49. Aaron Ben-Ze’Ev: The Arc of Love. [REVIEW]Cecilea Mun - 2020 - Phenomenological Reviews 6.
    I begin with my account of Ben-Ze’ev’s notions of acute, extended, and enduring emotions, focusing on explicating their ontological structure and identifying their differentia. I then discuss the two models of romantic love that Ben-Ze’ev introduces—the care model and the dialogue model—highlighting his argument against the claim that “love is a property of, and in some formulations resides in, the connection between the two lovers” (Ben-Ze’ev 2019, 48). Although this claim can be understood in at least one of two ways—as (...)
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  50. Üniversite öğrencilerinin utanç kavramlarının incelenmesi [A metaphorical investigation on the concept of shame among college students].Duygu Dincer - 2014 - Journal of International Social Research 29 (7):295-311.
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