About this topic
Summary

Philosophers working on the emotions are interested in answering the following kinds of questions:

What are emotions? Are they thoughts, feelings, perceptual or quasi-perceptual states, or something else? Or perhaps they are combination of all these things? Do emotions form a natural class? Are emotions natural kinds? Are emotions in some sense ‘socially constructed’?

What emotions are there? Is love an emotion? How about Schadenfreude? Are moods emotions? What about so-called moral or aesthetic or religious emotions? Are these emotions proper? Again, how are different emotions to be characterized? What distinguishes them from one another?

What is the relationship between emotion and reason? Can emotions be evaluated for their rationality? Or are emotions non-rational mental states? Do we need emotions in order to be ‘rational’?

Closely related to the last few questions, what is the nature of the relationship between emotion and morality? Are emotions needed to have insight into the evaluate realm? Can a person who lacks certain emotional capacities be a moral agent? How might emotion be important for understanding character, vice and virtue? How might emotion be a hindrance to morality?

Each of the emotion subcategories contains details of work on the emotions that is devoted to answering and shedding light on the above sorts of questions, along with many others.

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  1. Chhi: An Enquiry Into Vilas Sarang’s Selected Works.Arijeet Mandal - 2021 - Teresian Journal of English Studies 13 (3):39-50.
    The following essay tries to lay down an introductory analysis of the concept of disgust, and apply the very same ideas as an analytical tool for selected literary works by a Marathi/English bilingual author. Disgust is a universal emotion among humans, however, the conditions under which each person feels disgust are largely determined by their cultural conditioning. Vilas Sarang is an author who wrote several short stories that were published in different magazines between the 1970s to 1980s, later some of (...)
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  2. Brief History of Spitting: An India Account.Arijeet Mandal - 2020
    The first reaction after getting hurt or bruised among children and (often) adults is to put it in the mouth, and apply spit on it. There is a mention of the ‘spitting cure’ in Pliny’s account of history, as well as narrativised accounts of Jesus curing people with spit. It is as if we apply spit to what hurts us, or needs curing. And yet, spitting is related to age-old tradition of being treated as excreta, as an excess of the (...)
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  3. The Possibility of Emotional Appropriateness for Groups Identified with a Temperament.Emily S. Lee - 2021 - In Jerome Melancon (ed.), Transforming Politics with Merleau-Ponty. Lanham, MD: pp. 13-32.
    Recent work in the philosophy of emotion focuses on challenging dualistic conceptualizations. Three of the most obvious dualisms are the following: 1. emotion opposes reason; 2. emotion is subjective, while reason is objective; 3. emotion lies internal to the subject, while reason is external. With challenges to these dualisms, one of the more interesting questions that has surfaced is the idea of emotional appropriateness in a particular context. Here, consider a widely held belief in the United States associates racialized groups (...)
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  4. Evolutionary origin of emotions: Continuity between animals and humans.Zorana Todorovic - 2014 - Glasnik Za Društvene Nauke 6 (2014):45-62.
    This paper discusses the evolutionary origin and adaptive functions of emotions, in line with contemporary evolutionary psychology. Drawing upon Charles Darwin’s study of emotional expressions, it is argued that there is an evolutionary continuity among animals in emotional capacities, and that the differences between humans and animals are differences in degree and not in kind. The focus is on basic or primary emotions (joy, fear, sadness, anger), as it has been consistently shown that they are universal and shared among many (...)
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  5. Skepticism About Reasons for Emotions.Hichem Naar - forthcoming - Philosophical Explorations:1-16.
    According to a popular view, emotions are perceptual experiences of some kind. A common objection to this view is that, by contrast with perception, emotions are subject to normative reasons. In re...
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  6. The sense of we-agency and vitality attunement: between rhythmic alignment and emotional attunement.Francesca Forlè - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-21.
    In this paper I focus on possible boosting factors for the sense of we-agency in joint actions. My aim is to shed light on a factor that, until now, has received little or no consideration at all, and that I call vitality attunement. I argue that vitality attunement stands between two other boosting factors for the sense of we-agency—i.e., rhythmic alignment and emotional attunement. Investigating two examples of joint action, i.e., dancing and joint musical performances, I show that vitality attunement (...)
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  7. An Argument From Normativity for Primitive Emotional Phenomenology.Aarón Álvarez-González - 2021 - Philosophical Papers 50 (1-2):31-52.
    Uriah Kriegel has attempted to describe the varieties of consciousness, that is, the primitive elements that constitute the phenomenal realm. Perceptual, imaginative, algedonic, cognitive, entertai...
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  8. Envy and Resentment in the Time of Coronavirus.Sara Protasi - 2021 - Journal of Hate Studies 17 (1):4-13.
    I examine the role played by the emotions of envy and resentment in interpersonal online dynamics during the COVID19 pandemic. I start by reviewing what we know about the interplay of social media use, social comparison and well-being, and by applying this knowledge to current circumstances. Then, I introduce some philosophical distinctions that complicate the already complex empirical evidence, differentiating, in particular, between envy and resentment, and between different kinds of envy. I argue that we can use the knowledge of (...)
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  9. Role of Emotion Regulation and Spirituality in Predicting the Psychological Well-Being of the Elderlies.Maryam Safara, Mojtaba SalmAbadi & Ali TayeraniRad - 2020 - Health, Spirituality and Medical Ethics 7 (4):58-66.
    Background and Objectives: Despite the advancement of health science and its expansion, the number of elderlies is increasing annually throughout the world, highlighting the necessity of paying attention to the issue of increasing the psychological well-being of senior citizens. Therefore, the present study was conducted to determine the role of emotion regulation and spirituality in predicting the psychological well-being of the elderlies. Methods: This descriptive-correlational study was performed on the elderlies living in the nursing homes in Qazvin, Iran, in the (...)
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  10. The Passionate Beliefs. A Defense of the Cognitive-Evaluative Theory of Emotions.Giulio Sacco - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-21.
    The philosophy of emotions has long been dominated by the view called «cognitivism». According to it, emotions are characterized not by mere physical impulses but by a cognitive evaluation of their object. However, despite their success, cognitive theories have to deal with various objections and are divided on how to answer to them. In this essay I want to defend the form of cognitivism claimed by Martha Nussbaum from the most common criticisms. After a brief summary of her account, I (...)
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  11. Emotional AI, Ethics, and Japanese Spice: Contributing Community, Wholeness, Sincerity, and Heart.Andrew McStay - forthcoming - Philosophy and Technology:1-22.
    This paper assesses leading Japanese philosophical thought since the onset of Japan’s modernity: namely, from the Meiji Restoration onwards. It argues that there are lessons of global value for AI ethics to be found from examining leading Japanese philosophers of modernity and ethics, each of whom engaged closely with Western philosophical traditions. Turning to these philosophers allows us to advance from what are broadly individualistically and Western-oriented ethical debates regarding emergent technologies that function in relation to AI, by introducing notions (...)
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  12. Arnaud François & Camille Riquier (eds.). Annales bergsoniennes VIII: Bergson, la morale, les émotions. Paris: PUF, 2017, 364 páginas. [REVIEW]Clara Zimmermann - 2020 - Boletín de Estética 52:111-115.
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  13. Abduction, Perception, Emotion, Feeling: Body Maps and Pattern Recognition.Miroslava Trajkovski & Timothy Williamson - forthcoming - Philosophical Perspectives.
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  14. Better Scared than Sorry: The Pragmatic Account of Emotional Representation.Kris Goffin - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-18.
    Some emotional representations seem to be unreliable. For instance, we are often afraid when there is no danger present. If emotions such as fear are so unreliable, what function do they have in our representational system? This is a problem for representationalist theories of emotion. I will argue that seemingly unreliable emotional representations are reliable after all. While many mental states strike an optimal balance between minimizing inaccurate representations and maximizing accurate representations, some emotional representations only aim at maximizing accuracy. (...)
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  15. Introspection of Emotions.Bertille De Vlieger & Anna Giustina - forthcoming - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
    In this paper, we argue that knowledge of emotions essentially depends on introspecting the phenomenology of emotional experiences, and that introspection of emotional experiences is a process by stages, where the most fundamental stage is a non-classificatory introspective state, i.e., one that does not depend on the subject’s classifying the introspected emotion as an instance of any experience type. We call such a non-classificatory kind of introspection primitive introspection. Our main goal is to show that, although not sufficient, primitive introspection (...)
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  16. Examining Incivility Through a Moral Lens: Coworker Morality Appraisals, Other-Condemning Emotions, and Instigated Incivility.Gerardo A. Miranda & Jennifer L. Welbourne - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-19.
    While much is known about the prevalence and impact of incivility in the workplace, relatively less is known about those who instigate workplace incivility. This research aims to investigate incivility instigation through a moral lens by examining the roles of other-condemning moral emotions and appraisals of coworkers’ morality as predictors of this behavior at work. In Study 1, we used structural equation modeling to analyze two waves of self-report data collected from a sample of 447 full-time United States working adults. (...)
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  17. Heidegger's Philosophical Anthropology of Moods.James Cartlidge - 2020 - Hungarian Philosophical Review 2020 (Self, Narrativity, Emotions):15.
    Martin Heidegger often and emphatically claimed that his work, especially in his masterpiece Being and Time, was not philosophical anthropology. He conceived of his project as ‘fundamental ontology’, and argued that because it is singularly concerned with the question of the meaning of Being in general (and not ‘human being’), this precluded him from being engaged in philosophical anthropology. This is a claim we should find puzzling because at the very heart of Heidegger’s project is an analysis of the structures (...)
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  18. Anxiety and Boredom in the Covid-19 Crisis: A Heideggerian Analysis.James Cartlidge - 2020 - Biblioteca Della Libertà (Covid-19: A Global Challenge):22.
    Martin Heidegger gave a penetrating account of the different varieties of the moods of anxiety and boredom, which have no doubt been prevalent in the human experience of the Covid-19 pandemic. Heidegger theorized a particular type of anxiety and boredom as what I call 'revelatory moods', intense affective experiences that involve an encounter with our existence as such, our world, freedom and responsibility for the creation and proliferation of significance. Revelatory moods contain much emancipatory potential, acting as existential catalysts for (...)
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  19. Being Moved: Motion and Emotion in Classical Antiquity and Today.David Konstan - forthcoming - Emotion Review.
    Efforts to identify in the expression “being moved” a new emotion have found a hospitable environment in the recent turn to the body in emotion and cognitive studies, exemplified herein affect theo...
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  20. Emotional Clashes and Female Public Nudity in Thailand.Suchada Thaweesit - forthcoming - Diogenes.
    This article revisits cultural controversies over female public nudity in Thai society. It uses Songkran’s topless dancing in 2011 and a bare-breast painting performance on the ‘Thailand’s Got Tale...
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  21. National Emotions and Heroism in King Vajiravudh’s Anti-Chinese Propaganda Writing.Wasana Wongsurawat - forthcoming - Diogenes.
    The royalist nationalist propaganda writings of King Vajiravudh Rama VI—acclaimed author of the infamous Jews of the Orient, published originally in Thai since 1914—represent some of the finest exa...
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  22. Ways to Form a Favorable Emotional Background in the English Language Lesson as a Health-Saving Factor in Distance Learning.Veronika Mikhailovna Grebennikova, Larisa Ulfatovna Badrtdinova & Irina Gennadievna Galushko - 2021 - Kant 38 (1):213-217.
    The article describes techniques for organizing an English lesson that help reduce stress and increase students ' motivation. Comprehensive and continuous use of the described methods is the most important condition for a comfortable stress-free environment in the classroom, which forms a healthy and successful student. The article also contains recommendations for creating a comfortable emotional background in the English lesson by means of special mini-exercises, games, and chants aimed at attracting students attention.
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  23. Emotion Metaphors in an Awakening Language : Kaurna, the Language of the Adelaide Plains.Rob Amery - 2020 - Pragmatics Cognition 27 (1):272-312.
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  24. The Body and the Verb : Emotion in Gija.Frances Kofod & Anna Crane - 2020 - Pragmatics Cognition 27 (1):209-239.
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  25. Feeling Through Your Chest : Body-Based Tropes for Emotion in Anindilyakwa.James Bednall - 2020 - Pragmatics Cognition 27 (1):139-183.
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  26. The Role of the Body in Descriptions of Emotions : A Typology of the Australian Continent.Maïa Ponsonnet & Kitty-Jean Laginha - 2020 - Pragmatics Cognition 27 (1):20-82.
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  27. Introduction : Grammar, Culture, and Emotion Tropes.Maïa Ponsonnet, Dorothea Hoffmann & Isabel O’Keeffe - 2020 - Pragmatics Cognition 27 (1):1-19.
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  28. Doxastic Cognitivism: An Anti-Intellectualist Theory of Emotion.Christina H. Dietz - 2020 - Philosophical Perspectives 34 (1):27-52.
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  29. Emotion Metaphors in an Awakening Language.Rob Amery - 2020 - Pragmatics and Cognition 27 (1):272-312.
    Kaurna, the language of the Adelaide Plains, is an awakening language undergoing revival since 1989. Though little knowledge of Kaurna remains in the oral tradition and no sound recordings of the language as it was spoken in the nineteenth century exist, a surprising number and range of emotion terms were documented. A great many of these involve the tangka ‘liver’ followed by kuntu ‘chest’, wingku ‘lungs’, yurni ‘throat’ and yurlu ‘forehead’, whilst mukamuka ‘brain’ and yuri ‘ear’ are involved in cognition. (...)
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  30. Ear and Belly in Warlpiri Descriptions of Cognitive and Emotional Experience.Mary Laughren & Maïa Ponsonnet - 2020 - Pragmatics and Cognition 27 (1):240-271.
    Like most other Australian languages, Warlpiri – a Pama-Nyungan language of the Ngumpin-Yapa group – is rich in figurative expressions that include a body-part noun. In this article we examine the collocations involving two body parts: langa ‘ear’, which mostly relates to cognition; and miyalu ‘belly’, which mostly relates to emotion. Drawing on an extensive Warlpiri database, we analyse the semantic, figurative and syntactic dimensions of these collocations. We note how reflexive variants of certain collocations impose a non-literal aspectual reading, (...)
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  31. The Expression of Emotions in Kunbarlang and its Neighbours in the Multilingual Context of Western and Central Arnhem Land.Isabel O’Keeffe, Ruth Singer & Carolyn Coleman - 2020 - Pragmatics and Cognition 27 (1):83-138.
    This paper explores how emotions are expressed in the endangered Gunwinyguan language Kunbarlang and compares these expressions to those in the neighbouring Gunwinyguan language Bininj Kunwok, and neighbouring languages from other language families, Mawng and Ndjébbana. As well as considering body-based emotion expressions and the tropes they instantiate, we consider the range of other expressions and tropes available in each language. These provide an important point of comparison with the body-part expressions, which are limited to expressions based on noun incorporation (...)
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  32. The Role of the Body in Descriptions of Emotions.Maïa Ponsonnet & Kitty-Jean Laginha - 2020 - Pragmatics and Cognition 27 (1):20-82.
    This article presents the first systematic typological study of emotional expressions involving body parts at the scale of a continent, namely the Australian continent. The role of body parts in figurative descriptions of emotions, a well-established phenomenon across the world, is known to be widespread in Australian languages. This article presents a typology of body-based emotional expressions across a balanced sample of 67 languages, where we found that at least 30 distinct body parts occur in emotional expressions. The belly is (...)
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  33. Kingian Personalism, Moral Emotions, and Emersonian Perfectionism in Advance.J. Edward Hackett - forthcoming - The Acorn.
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  34. Virtue and Emotional Accuracy.Vida Yao -
    It is now common for moral philosophers to be wary of conflating two distinct forms of emotional assessment: the “fittingness” of an emotion, with any form of moral assessment of that emotion. The philosophers who warned against this conflation, Justin D’Arms and Daniel Jacobson, also warned philosophers not to infer from claims that an emotion is a morally inappropriate emotion to feel, to claims that the emotion is inaccurate, or “unfitting”. Such an inference, they argue, is an instance of what (...)
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  35. The Evolutionary Origin of Selfhood in Normative Emotions.David L. Thompson - manuscript
    Modern selfhood presents itself as autonomous, overcoming emotion by following cognitive, moral and linguistic norms on the basis of clear, rational principles. It is difficult to imagine how such normative creatures could have evolved from their purely biological, non-normative, primate ancestors. I offer a just-so story to make it easier to imagine this transition. Early hominins learned to cooperate by developing group identities based on tribal norms. Group identity constituted proto-selves as normative creatures. Such group identity was not based on (...)
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  36. A System for Automatic Emotion Attribution Based on a Commonsense Reasoning Framework.Antonio Lieto - 2021 - In Proceedings of AISC Graduate Conference. Roma RM, Italia: pp. 1-8.
    This work describes an explainable system for emotion attribution and recommendation (called DEGARI (Dynamic Emotion Generator And ReclassIfier) relying on a recently introduced probabilistic commonsense reasoning framework.
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  37. Berit Brogaard, Hatred: Understanding Our Most Dangerous Emotion.Paula Keller - 2021 - Ethics 132 (1):232-238.
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  38. Content and the Fittingness of Emotion.Brian Scott Ballard - 2021 - Philosophical Quarterly 71 (4):pqaa074.
    Many philosophers of emotion, whether perceptual or cognitive theorists, have claimed that emotions represent evaluative properties. This is often supported by an appeal to the fittingness of emotion: that emotions can be fitting shows they represent evaluative properties. In this paper, however, I argue that this inference is much too fast. In fact, no aspect of the rational assessment of emotion directly supports the claim that emotions represent evaluative properties. This inference can, however, be matured into an inference to the (...)
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  39. Attitudinal Evaluation, Emotion, and the Will.Mark Textor - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  40. “What is an Existential Emotion?,” Hungarian Philosophical Review 64 (December 2020), Pp. 88-100.David Weberman - 2020 - Hungarian Philosophical Review 64:88-100.
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  41. The Expression of Emotion in Pictures.Vanessa Brassey - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (9):e12767.
    Philosophy Compass, Volume 16, Issue 9, September 2021.
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  42. Emotional Intelligence and Servant Leadership: A Meta-Analytic Review.Chao Miao, Ronald H. Humphrey & Shanshan Qian - 2021 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 30 (2):231-243.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, Volume 30, Issue 2, Page 231-243, April 2021.
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  43. What basic emotions really are: modularity, motivation, and behavioral variability.Isaac Wiegman - 2021 - Biology and Philosophy 36 (5):1-28.
    While there is ongoing debate about the existence of basic emotions and about their status as natural kinds, these debates usually carry on under the assumption that basic emotions are modular and therefore cannot account for behavioral variability in emotional situations. Moreover, both sides of the debate have assumed that these putative features of basic emotions distinguish them as products of evolution rather than products of culture and experience. I argue that these assumptions are unwarranted, that there is empirical evidence (...)
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  44. Different Ways of Being Emotional About the Past.Marina Trakas - forthcoming - Journal Filosofia Unisinos - Unisinos Journal of Philosophy.
    According to Dorothea Debus (2007), all emotional aspects related to an act of remembering are present and new emotional responses to the remembered past event. This is a common conception of the nature of the emotional aspect of personal memories, if not explicitly defended then at least implicitly accepted in the literature. In this article, I first criticize Debus’ arguments and demonstrate that she does not give us valid reasons to believe that all the emotional aspects related to a memory (...)
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  45. Emotion and COVID-19: Toward an Equitable Pandemic Response.Bennett Allen - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-4.
    This article discusses the ways in which healthcare professionals can use emotion as part of developing an ethical response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Affect theory, a growing approach to inquiry in the social sciences and humanities that appraises the historical and cultural contexts of emotions as expressed through art and politics, offers a frame for clinicians and researchers to consider ethical questions that surround the reopening of the United States economy in the wake of COVID-19. This article uses affect theory (...)
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  46. How and Why to Express the Emotions: A Taxonomy of Emotional Expression with Historical Illustrations.Christopher Bennett - forthcoming - Metaphilosophy.
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  47. Dimensiones de análisis de los recuerdos personales como recuerdos afectivos.Marina Trakas - 2021 - Revista de Psicología UNLP 20 (1):256-284.
    La investigación reciente en psicología cognitiva sobre la memoria emocional ha estudiado las distintas formas en que las emociones afectan a la memoria, sin profundizar no obstante en la comprensión de la manera en que los aspectos emocionales, afectivos y mnemónicos se encuentran estrechamente entrelazados en el contenido mismo de un acto de reminiscencia. En este artículo propongo un marco conceptual de análisis que nos permite entender los recuerdos personales como recuerdos esencialmente afectivos, y que se articula en torno a (...)
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  48. Idle Souls, Regulated Emotions of a Mind Industry: A New Look at Ottoman Materialism.Şeyma Afacan - 2021 - Journal of Islamic Studies 32 (3):317-353.
    The phenomenon of ‘materialism’ in the late Ottoman Empire has long been explained as the vehicle of fully-fledged modernization in allegedly essential opposition to tradition and religion. Amid growing intellectual interest in aspects of the individual such as mind, soul, brain, and emotions in the late Ottoman period, this paper shifts the explanatory focus from religious vs. nationalist ideologies to the discourse of ‘productivity’. It argues that before the discourse of national homogenization came to dominate intellectual writings in the late (...)
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  49. Is Epistemic Anxiety an Intellectual Virtue?Frank Cabrera - 2021 - Synthese:1-25.
    In this paper, I discuss the ways in which epistemic anxiety promotes well-being, specifically by examining the positive contributions that feelings of epistemic anxiety make toward intellectually virtuous inquiry. While the prospects for connecting the concept of epistemic anxiety to the two most prominent accounts of intellectual virtue, i.e., “virtue-reliabilism” and “virtue-responsibilism”, are promising, I primarily focus on whether the capacity for epistemic anxiety counts as an intellectual virtue in the reliabilist sense. As I argue, there is a close yet (...)
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  50. International Students’ Knowledge and Emotions Related to Academic Integrity at Canadian Postsecondary Institutions.Lisa Vogt, Loie Gervais, Brenda M. Stoesz & Hafizat Sanni-Anibire - 2021 - International Journal for Educational Integrity 17 (1).
    This study investigated the knowledge of academic integrity and associated emotions of a small sample of international students studying at Canadian postsecondary institutions using survey methodology. Depending on the survey item, 25–60 participants provided responses. Many respondents appeared knowledgeable about academic integrity and misconduct and reported that expectations in their home countries and in Canada were similar. There was, however, disagreement on the concept of duplicate submission/self-plagiarism, indicating an important gap in educating students about specific aspects of policy in postsecondary (...)
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