About this topic
Summary

Philosophers working on the emotions are interested in answering the following kinds of questions:

What are emotions? Are they thoughts, feelings, perceptual or quasi-perceptual states, or something else? Or perhaps they are combination of all these things? Do emotions form a natural class? Are emotions natural kinds? Are emotions in some sense ‘socially constructed’?

What emotions are there? Is love an emotion? How about Schadenfreude? Are moods emotions? What about so-called moral or aesthetic or religious emotions? Are these emotions proper? Again, how are different emotions to be characterized? What distinguishes them from one another?

What is the relationship between emotion and reason? Can emotions be evaluated for their rationality? Or are emotions non-rational mental states? Do we need emotions in order to be ‘rational’?

Closely related to the last few questions, what is the nature of the relationship between emotion and morality? Are emotions needed to have insight into the evaluate realm? Can a person who lacks certain emotional capacities be a moral agent? How might emotion be important for understanding character, vice and virtue? How might emotion be a hindrance to morality?

Each of the emotion subcategories contains details of work on the emotions that is devoted to answering and shedding light on the above sorts of questions, along with many others.

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  1. Review of Adamatzky (2005): Dynamics of Crowd-Minds: Patterns of Irrationality in Emotions, Beliefs and Actions. [REVIEW]Ephraim Nissan - 2009 - Pragmatics and Cognition 17 (2):472-481.
  2. Emotional Labor.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    Emotional labor can be defined as a form of emotional regulation in which employees have to display certain emotions as part of their work and promote organizational goals. Such organizational control of emotions can lead to suppression of feelings through emotional dissonance, altered relational perceptions, changed communication patterns, and other negative and counterproductive personal and work effects including stress, demotivation and exhaustion. Emotional labor involves managing feelings and emotions to meet the demands of a job. DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.13203.30248.
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  3. Emotional Intelligence in Organizations.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    Currently, organizations must face, in addition to increased competition, also to exponential technological development and innovation, and to change processes that affect all emotional states of employees. All these challenges, along with the imposed changes and the complexity of organizational and managerial tasks, involve new emotional demands and more effective actions at the corporate level, including by managing emotions in most circumstances. Thus, emotions represent valuable "resources" for innovation and added value in an economic process. Emotions were thus given an (...)
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  4. Emotional Intelligence in Eastern Philosophy.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    Wisdom in Hinduism regards self-knowledge as the truth, the basis of all Creation, of Shristi. It would turn out that the wise is a person with the self-consciousness of the whole creation in all its facets and forms. There are not many studies regarding emotional intelligence from the Indian perspective, although emotional intelligence is found in every text in ancient Indian literature (Rig Veda, Yajur Veda, Ayurveda, etc.). The Indian philosophical tradition emphasizes the strong nature of emotions, which must be (...)
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  5. Philosophy of Emotional Intelligence.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    The critical reflection of the aspects of emotional intelligence can be put on account of the different epistemological perspectives, reflecting a maturity of the concept. There is a need to find consistent empirical evidence for the dimensionality of emotional intelligence and to develop appropriate methods for its correct and useful measurement. A concern of researchers is whether emotional intelligence is a theory of personality, a form of intelligence, or a combination of both. Many studies consider emotional intelligence to be a (...)
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  6. Models of Emotional Intelligence - EI in Research and Education.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    The emotional intelligence models have helped to develop different tools for construct assessment. Each theoretical paradigm conceptualizes emotional intelligence from one of two perspectives: ability or mixed model. Ability models consider emotional intelligence as a pure form of mental ability and therefore as pure intelligence. Mixed models of emotional intelligence combine mental capacity with personality traits. The trait models of IE refer to the individual perceptions of their own emotional abilities. Cognitive learning involves placing new information into existing frameworks and (...)
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  7. Non-Standard Emotions and Aesthetic Understanding.Irene Martínez Marín - 2020 - Estetika 2 (57):135–49.
    For cognitivist accounts of aesthetic appreciation, appreciation requires an agent (1) to perceptually respond to the relevant aesthetic features of an object o on good evidential grounds, (2) to have an autonomous grasp of the reasons that make the claim about the aesthetic features of o true by pointing out the connection between non-aesthetic features and the aesthetic features of o, (3) to be able to provide an explanation of why those features contribute to the overall aesthetic value of o. (...)
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  8. Emotional Intelligence.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    Emotional intelligence is the ability of individuals to recognize their own and others' emotions, to discern between different feelings and to label them correctly, using emotional information to guide thinking and behavior, and to manage and adjust emotions to adapt to the environment or to achieve their own goals. There are several models that aim to measure emotional intelligence levels. Goleman's original model is a mixed model that combines abilities with traits. A trait model was developed by Konstantinos V. Petrides (...)
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  9. Ethics of Emotions.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    Emotions have often been considered a threat to morality and rationality; in the Romantic tradition, passions were placed at the center of both human individuality and moral life. This ambivalence has led to an ambiguity between the terms of emotions for vices and virtues. Epicureans and Stoics have argued that emotions are irrational. The Stoics believed that virtue is nothing but knowledge, and emotions are essentially irrational beliefs. Skeptics believed that beliefs were responsible for pain, recommending rejection of opinions of (...)
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  10. Philosophy of Emotions.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    In the epistemological context, two questions have a special relevance: "are emotions knowledge?" and "is a uniform theory of emotions necessary to evaluate the epistemological state of emotions?". A restrictive interpretation of "knowledge" requires theories to have propositional content. In such a case, emotions are usually assimilated to normative beliefs or judgments. More liberal interpretations of "knowledge" also include theories that interpret emotions on the perception model. A minimal definition of cognitive theories of emotions includes the assertion that emotions are (...)
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  11. Processing Emotions - Happiness.Sfetcu Nicolae - manuscript
    According to Antonio Damasio, the emotional process begins with conscious considerations about the object in the form of mental images. These images correspond to a neural substrate (topographic representations) influenced by the dispositional representations. At the unconscious level, the networks in the prefrontal cortex respond automatically and involuntarily to the signals derived from the processing of the above images, according to the dispositional representations, acquired based on personal experience rather than innate. DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.2.21624.06401.
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  12. The Hedonic Character of Nostalgia: An Integrative Data Analysis.Joost Leunissen, Tim Wildschut, Constantine Sedikides & Clay Routledge - forthcoming - Emotion Review:175407392095045.
    We conducted an integrative data analysis to examine the hedonic character of nostalgia. We combined positive and negative affect measures from 41 experiments manipulating nostalgia. Overall, nostalgia inductions increased positive and ambivalent affect, but did not significantly alter negative affect. The magnitude of nostalgia’s effects varied markedly across different experimental inductions of the emotion. The hedonic character of nostalgia, then, depends on how the emotion is elicited and the benchmark to which it is compared. We discuss implications for theory and (...)
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  13. Measuring Positive Emotion Outcomes in Positive Psychology Interventions: A Literature Review.Judith T. Moskowitz, Elaine O. Cheung, Melanie Freedman, Christa Fernando, Madelynn W. Zhang, Jeff C. Huffman & Elizabeth L. Addington - forthcoming - Emotion Review:175407392095081.
    Accumulating evidence for the unique social, behavioral, and physical health benefits of positive emotion and related well-being constructs has led to the development and testing of positive psychological interventions to increase emotional well-being and enhance health promotion and disease prevention. PPIs are specifically aimed at improving emotional well-being and consist of practices such as gratitude, savoring, and acts of kindness. The purpose of this narrative review was to examine the literature on PPIs with a particular focus on positive emotion outcomes. (...)
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  14. Laughter and Pleasure.Karl Pfeifer - 1994 - Humor: International Journal of Humor Research 7 (2):157-172.
    Karl Pfeifer counters the thesis that laughter and pleasure are intimately connected with one another, and addresses the thesis of John Morreall (1982) that a pleasant psyohological shift is a causally necessary condition for laughter. A variety of examples suggesting that laughter does not have to have pleasure as its causal anteoedent are presented. Imitative, nervous, hysterical, physiogenic, and acerbic laughter suggest that it is neither incoherent nor implausible to consider laughter as being caused by unpleasant or at least not (...)
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  15. Virtuous Emotions, Written by Kristján Kristjánsson. [REVIEW]Pilar Lopez-Cantero - 2020 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 17 (4):457-460.
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  16. Emotions and Process Rationality.Oded Na'aman - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-16.
    Some epistemologists hold that all rational norms are fundamentally concerned with the agent’s states or attitudes at an individual time [Hedden 2015, 2016; Moss 2015]; others argue that all rational norms are fundamentally concerned with processes [Podgorski 2017]. This distinction is not drawn in discussions of emotional rationality. As a result, a widely held assumption in the literature on emotional rationality has gone unexamined. I employ Abelard Podgorski’s argument from rational delay to argue that many emotional norms are fundamentally concerned (...)
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  17. Sentimental Perceptualism and the Challenge From Cognitive Bases.Michael Milona & Hichem Naar - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 177 (10):3071-3096.
    According to a historically popular view, emotions are normative experiences that ground moral knowledge much as perceptual experiences ground empirical knowledge. Given the analogy it draws between emotion and perception, sentimental perceptualism constitutes a promising, naturalist-friendly alternative to classical rationalist accounts of moral knowledge. In this paper, we consider an important but underappreciated objection to the view, namely that in contrast with perception, emotions depend for their occurrence on prior representational states, with the result that emotions cannot give perceptual-like access (...)
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  18. Review of Laura Candiotto's The Value of Emotions for Knowledge. [REVIEW]Angela Mendelovici - 2020 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 1.
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  19. Unscrutable Morality: Could Anyone Know Every Moral Truth?Marcus Hunt - 2020 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 59 (20):215-227.
    To begin to answer the question of whether every moral truth could be known by any one individual, this paper examines David Chalmers’ views on the scrutability of moral truths in Constructing the World. Chalmers deals with the question of the scrutability of moral truths ecumenically, claiming that moral truths are scrutable on all plausible metaethical views. I raise two objections to Chalmers’ approach. The first objection is that he confl ates the claim that moral truths are scrutable from PQTI (...)
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  20. Beyond Correlation: Acoustic Transformation Methods for the Experimental Study of Emotional Voice and Speech.Pablo Arias, Laura Rachman, Marco Liuni & Jean-Julien Aucouturier - forthcoming - Emotion Review.
    While acoustic analysis methods have become a commodity in voice emotion research, experiments that attempt not only to describe but to computationally manipulate expressive cues in emotional voice...
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  21. History Looks Forward: Interdisciplinarity and Critical Emotion Research.Rob Boddice - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (3):131-134.
    The history of emotions has become a thriving focus within the discipline of history, but it has in the process gained a critical purchase that makes it relevant for other disciplines concerned with emotion research. The history of emotions is entangled with the history of the body and brain, and with cultural and political history. It is interested in the how and why of emotion change; with the questions of power and authority behind cultural scripts of expression, conceptual usages, and (...)
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  22. Emotional Pursuits and the American Revolution.Nicole Eustace - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (3):146-155.
    A major paradox of modern happiness gained wide public exposure in 1776 when Thomas Jefferson substituted the phrase “the pursuit of happiness” in place of Locke’s formulation: “life, liberty, and property.” In substituting happiness for property, Jefferson obscured the central hypocrisy of the Revolution, that—as contemporaries complained—the “loudest yelps for liberty” were made by those practicing slavery. Jefferson elided the overlap between the pursuit of happiness and the protection of human property. And he blurred the connection between the assertion of (...)
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  23. Darwin and the Situation of Emotion Research.Daniel M. Gross & Stephanie D. Preston - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (3):179-190.
    This article demonstrates how researchers from both the sciences and the humanities can learn from Charles Darwin’s mixed methodology. We identify two basic challenges that face emotion research in the sciences, namely a mismatch between experiment design and the complexity of life that we aim to explain, and problematic efforts to bridge the gap, including invalid inferences from constrained study designs, and equivocal use of terms like “sympathy” and “empathy” that poorly reflect such methodological constraints. We argue that Darwin’s mixed (...)
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  24. The Unavoidable Intentionality of Affect: The History of Emotions and the Neurosciences of the Present Day.William M. Reddy - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (3):168-178.
    The “problem of emotions,” that is, that many of them are both meaningful and corporeal, has yet to be resolved. Western thinkers, from Augustine to Descartes to Zajonc, have handled this problem by employing various forms of mind–body dualism. Some psychologists and neuroscientists since the 1970s have avoided it by talking about cognitive and emotional “processing,” using a terminology borrowed from computer science that nullifies the meaningful or intentional character of both thought and emotion. Outside the Western-influenced contexts, emotion and (...)
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  25. Self-Esteem, Social Esteem, and Pride.Alessandro Salice - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (3):193-205.
    This article explores self-esteem as an episodic self-conscious emotion. Episodic self-esteem is first distinguished from trait self-esteem, which is described as an enduring state related to the subject’s sense of self-worth. Episodic self-esteem is further compared with pride by claiming that the two attitudes differ in crucial respects. Importantly, episodic self-esteem—but not pride—is a function of social esteem: in episodic self-esteem, the subject evaluates herself in the same way in which others evaluate her. Furthermore, social esteem elicits episodic self-esteem if (...)
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  26. Comment: Historians in the Emotion Laboratory.Otniel E. Dror - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (3):191-192.
    In this comment, I indicate several challenges and opportunities—out of the many—for an integrated science–humanities approach to emotions, from the perspective of a historian of the modern science...
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  27. The Odor of Disgust: Contemplating the Dark Side of 20th-Century Cancer History.Bettina Hitzer - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (3):156-167.
    This article explores how historians of emotions and historians of the senses can collaborate to write a history of emotional experience that takes seriously the corporeality of emotions. It invest...
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  28. A Collective Emotion in Medieval Italy: The Flagellant Movement of 1260.Piroska Nagy & Xavier Biron-Ouellet - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (3):135-145.
    The purpose of this article is to open a dialogue between research in social sciences concerning collective emotion and historical investigation concerning a religious and political movement of the...
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  29. Bittersweet Food.Shen-yi Liao - forthcoming - Critica.
    Nostalgia and food are intertwined universals in human experience. All of us have experienced nostalgia centered on food, and all of us have experienced food infused with nostalgia. To explore the links between nostalgia and food, I start with a rough taxonomy of nostalgic foods, and illustrate it with examples. Despite their diversity, I argue that there is a psychological commonality to experiencing nostalgic foods of all kinds: imagination. On my account, imagination is the key to understanding the cognitive, conative, (...)
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  30. The ‘Magical World’ of Emotions and Its Triumph: On the Ontological Inconsistency in Sartre’s Sketch for a Theory of the Emotions.Renxiang Liu - 2020 - Sophia 59 (2):333-343.
    In this paper, I explore the ontological implication of Sartre’s and Heidegger’s phenomenological accounts of emotion. I start by looking at Sartre’s notion of the ‘magical world’ in his booklet Sketch for a Theory of the Emotions, showing how emotion, for him, reveals the overall structure of ‘human reality’ rather than a dispensable aspect of it. Discussing experiences of the magical world allowed Sartre to ‘bracket’ what he called ‘the determinism of the world’, which predominated naturalist-representationalist psychology of emotion in (...)
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  31. A Relational Conception of Emotional Development.Michael Mascolo - forthcoming - Emotion Review:175407392093079.
    In this article, I outline a relational-developmental conception of emotion that situates emotional activity within a broader conception of persons as holistic, relational beings. In this model, emotions consist of felt forms of engagement with the world. As felt aspects of ongoing action, uninhibited emotional experiences are not private states that are inaccessible to other people; instead, they are revealed directly through their bodily expressions. As multicomponent processes, emotional experiences exhibit both continuity and dramatic change in development. Building on these (...)
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  32. The Evolution of Human Vocal Emotion.Gregory A. Bryant - forthcoming - Emotion Review:175407392093079.
    Vocal affect is a subcomponent of emotion programs that coordinate a variety of physiological and psychological systems. Emotional vocalizations comprise a suite of vocal behaviors shaped by evolution to solve adaptive social communication problems. The acoustic forms of vocal emotions are often explicable with reference to the communicative functions they serve. An adaptationist approach to vocal emotions requires that we distinguish between evolved signals and byproduct cues, and understand vocal affect as a collection of multiple strategic communicative systems subject to (...)
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  33. Support Vector Machines and Affective Science.Chris H. Miller, Matthew D. Sacchet & Ian H. Gotlib - forthcoming - Emotion Review:175407392093078.
    Support vector machines are being used increasingly in affective science as a data-driven classification method and feature reduction technique. Whereas traditional statistical methods typically compare group averages on selected variables, SVMs use a predictive algorithm to learn multivariate patterns that optimally discriminate between groups. In this review, we provide a framework for understanding the methods of SVM-based analyses and summarize the findings of seminal studies that use SVMs for classification or data reduction in the behavioral and neural study of emotion (...)
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  34. Explaining Imagination (Open Access Monograph).Peter Langland-Hassan - 2020 - Oxford University Press.
    ​Imagination will remain a mystery—we will not be able to explain imagination—until we can break it into parts we already understand. Explaining Imagination is a guidebook for doing just that, where the parts are other ordinary mental states like beliefs, desires, judgments, and decisions. In different combinations and contexts, these states constitute cases of imagining. This reductive approach to imagination is at direct odds with the current orthodoxy, according to which imagination is a sui generis mental state or process—one with (...)
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  35. Emotions in Sport and Games.Alfred Archer & Nathan Wildman (eds.) - 2020 - Routledge.
    Emotions play an important role in both sport and games, from the pride and joy of victory, the misery and shame of defeat, and the anger and anxiety felt along the way. This volume brings together experts in the philosophy of sport and games and experts in the philosophy of emotion to investigate this important area of research. The book discusses the role of the emotions for both participants and spectators of sports and games, including detailed discussions of suffering, shame, (...)
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  36. Shame, Vulnerability and Philosophical Thinking.Sigridur Thorgeirsdottir - 2020 - Sophia 59 (1):5-17.
    Shame in the deep sense of fear of exposure of human vulnerability has been identified as one mood or disposition of philosophical thinking. Philosophical imaginary, disciplinary identity and misogynistic vocabulary testify to a collective, underlying, unprocessed shame inherent to the philosophical tradition like Le Doeuff, Butler and Murphy have pointed out. One aspect of collective philosophical shame has to do with disgust of or denial of embodiment insofar as it poses a threat to ideals of sovereignty and rationality. Embodiment reveals (...)
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  37. Comment: Developing and Maintaining High-Quality Relationships Via Emotion.Sara B. Algoe - forthcoming - Emotion Review.
    This comment addresses opportunities for understanding the social functions of emotion by taking a developmental perspective. I agree that understanding emotions and their development will meaningf...
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  38. How Safe Should We Feel? On the Ethics of Fear in the Public Sphere.Sabine Döring - 2020 - In Sebastian Schmidt & Gerhard Ernst (eds.), The Ethics of Belief and Beyond. Understanding Mental Normativity. Abingdon: Routledge. pp. 215-233.
    The question is why it is that objective safety level and subjective feeling of safety may come apart. Answering this question requires an analysis of the nature of fear in the public sphere since feeling safe means to feel that one avoids the frightening, i.e. the threats or dangers that one perceives in the world. Döring argues that the fact-resistance fear might display in the public sphere is due to the characteristic function that fear fulfills in this sphere. In the (...)
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  39. Review of ‘Strong Feelings: Emotion, Addiction, and Human Behaviour’, by J. Elster. [REVIEW]Louis C. Charland - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):108-110.
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  40. Emotion.Louis C. Charland & R. M. Gordon - 2005 - In Donald Borchert (ed.), Encyclopaedia of Philosophy (Vol. 2) (2nd Edition). pp. 197-203.
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  41. Emotion: Philosophical Issues.Louis C. Charland - 2009 - In Tim Bayne, Axel Cleeremans & Patrick Wilken (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Consciousness. Oxford, UK: pp. 259-262.
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  42. Ethical Issues (in Affective Science Research).Louis C. Charland - 2009 - In David Sanders & Klaus Scherer (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Emotion and Affective Sciences. Oxford, UK: pp. 157-158.
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  43. Qualia.Louis C. Charland - 2009 - In David Sanders & Klaus Scherer (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Emotion and Affective Sciences. Oxford, UK: pp. 327.
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  44. Affect (Philosophical Perspective).Louis C. Charland - 2009 - In David Sanders & Klaus Scherer (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Emotion and Affective Sciences. Oxford, UK: pp. 9-10.
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  45. Alexander Crichton on the Psychopathology of the Passions.Louis C. Charland - 2008 - History of Psychiatry 19 (3):275-296.
    Alexander Crichton (1763—1856) made significant contributions to the medical theory of the passions, yet there exists no systematic exegesis of this particular aspect of his work. The present article explores four themes in Crichton's work on the passions: (1) the role of irritability in the physiology of the passions; (2) the manner in which irritability and sensibility contribute to the valence, or polarity, of the passions; (3) the elaboration of a psychopathology of the passions that emphasizes their physiological form rather (...)
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  46. Religiöse Erfahrung zwischen Emotion und Kognition: William James' Karl Girgensohns, Rudolf Ottos und Carl Gustav Jungs Psychologie des religiösen Erleben.Józef Bremer - 2006 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 11:300-303.
  47. Happy Self-Surrender and Unhappy Self-Assertion: A Comparison Between Admiration and Emulative Envy.Sara Protasi - 2019 - In Alfred Archer & Andre Grahlé (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Admiration. New York: Rowman & Little International. pp. 45-60.
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  48. Bienvenida Ternura. Emoción y Narración en la Nueva Serialidad Televisiva.Irene Martínez Marín - 2018 - In Alberto Nahum García Martínez & María J. Ortiz (eds.), Cine y series. pp. 217-232.
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  49. Emotions in Cultural Dynamics.Yulia Chentsova-Dutton - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (2):47-47.
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  50. Using Models to Predict Cultural Evolution From Emotional Selection Mechanisms.Kimmo Eriksson & Pontus Strimling - 2019 - Emotion Review 12 (2):79-92.
    Cultural variants may spread by being more appealing, more memorable, or less offensive than other cultural variants. Empirical studies suggest that such “emotional selection” is a force to be reckoned with in cultural evolution. We present a research paradigm that is suitable for the study of emotional selection. It guides empirical research by directing attention to the circumstances under which emotions influence the likelihood that an individual will influence another individual to acquire a cultural variant. We present a modeling framework (...)
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