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  1. A History of the Locked-In-Syndrome: Ethics in the Making of Neurological Consciousness, 1880-Present.Stephen T. Casper - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (2):145-161.
    Extensive scholarship has described the historical and ethical imperatives shaping the emergence of the brain death criteria in the 1960s and 1970s. This essay explores the longer intellectual history that shaped theories of neurological consciousness from the late-nineteenth century to that period, and argues that a significant transformation occurred in the elaboration of those theories in the 1960s and after, the period when various disturbances of consciousness were discovered or thoroughly elaborated. Numerous historical conditions can be identified and attributed to (...)
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  • The History of the Brain and Mind Sciences.Alfred Freeborn - 2019 - History of the Human Sciences 32 (3):145-154.
    This review article critically surveys the following literature by placing it under the historiographical banner of ‘the history of the brain and mind sciences’: Fernando Vidal and Francisco Ortega, Being Brains: Making the Cerebral Subject ; Katja Guenther, Localization and its Discontents: A Genealogy of Psychoanalysis & the Neuro Disciplines ; Stephen Casper and Delia Gavrus, The History of the Brain and Mind Sciences: Technique, Technology, Therapy ; Jonna Brenninkmeijer, Neurotechnologies of the Self: Mind, Brain and Subjectivity. This framework highlights (...)
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  • What Makes Neuroethics Possible?Fernando Vidal - 2019 - History of the Human Sciences 32 (2):32-58.
    Since its emergence in the early 2000s, neuroethics has become a recognized, institutionalized and professionalized field. A central strategy for its successful development has been the claim that it must be an autonomous discipline, distinct in particular from bioethics. Such claim has been justified by the conviction, sustained since the 1990s by the capabilities attributed to neuroimaging technologies, that somehow ‘the mind is the brain’, that the brain sciences can illuminate the full range of human experience and behavior, and that (...)
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