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  1. From Reactive to Endogenously Active Dynamical Conceptions of the Brain.Adele Abrahamsen & William Bechtel - unknown
    We contrast reactive and endogenously active perspectives on brain activity. Both have been pursued continuously in neurophysiology laboratories since the early 20thcentury, but the endogenous perspective has received relatively little attention until recently. One of the many successes of the reactive perspective was the identification, in the second half of the 20th century, of the distinctive contributions of different brain regions involved in visual processing. The recent prominence of the endogenous perspective is due to new findings of ongoing oscillatory activity (...)
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  2. Immunoselection and Male Diseases.Matteo Adinolfi - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (3):441-442.
  3. Brain Evolution: Part I.Elizabeth Adkins-Regan - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (1):12-13.
    Striedter's accessible concept-based book is strong on the macroevolution of brains and the developmental principles that underlie how brains evolve on that scale. In the absence of greater attention to microevolution, natural selection, and sexual selection, however, it is incomplete and not fully modern on the evolution side. Greater biological integration is needed.
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  4. The Unsolved Problems of Neuroscience.Ralph Adolphs - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (4):173-175.
    Some problems in neuroscience are nearly solved. For others, solutions are decades away. The current pace of advances in methods forces us to take stock, to ask where we are going, and what we should research next.
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  5. Could a Robot Have Emotions? Theoretical Perspectives From Social Cognitive Neuroscience.Ralph Adolphs - 2004 - In J. Fellous (ed.), Who Needs Emotions. Oxford University Press.
  6. Philosophy and the Origin and Evolution of the Universe.Evandro Agazzi & Alberto Cordero (eds.) - 1991 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  7. Synchrony of Spikes and Attention in Visual Cortex.F. Aiple & B. Fischer - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):397.
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  8. Neuroscience in Pursuit of the Holy: Mysticism, the Brain, and Ultimate Reality.Carol Rausch Albright - 2001 - Zygon 36 (3):485-492.
  9. Zygon's 1996 Expedition Into Neuroscience and Religion.Carol Rausch Albright - 1996 - Zygon 31 (4):711-727.
  10. Genes Can Disconnect the Social Brain in More Than One Way.André Aleman & René S. Kahn - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):855-855.
    Burns proposes an intriguing hypothesis by suggesting that the “schizophrenia genes” might not be regulatory genes themselves, but rather closely associated with regulatory genes directly involved in the proper growth of the social brain. We point out that this account would benefit from incorporating the effects of localized lesions and aberrant hemispheric asymmetry on cortical connectivity underlying the social brain. In addition, we argue that the evolutionary framework is superfluous.
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  11. Reliability and Validity of Experiment in the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory.Sullivan Jacqueline Anne - 2007 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
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  12. A Pieced Quilt: A Critical Discussion of Stephen Schiffer'sRemnants of Meaning.Louise Antony - 1991 - Philosophical Psychology 4 (1):119-137.
    Abstract Stephen Schiffer, in his recent book, Remnants of Meaning, argues against the possibility of any compositional theory of meaning for natural language. Because the argument depends on the premise that there is no possible naturalistic reduction of the intentional to the physical, Schiffer's attack on theories of meaning is of central importance for theorists of mind. I respond to Schiffer's argument by showing that there is at least one reductive account of the mental that he has neglected to consider?the (...)
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  13. Margins of Me: A Personal Story (Chapter 1 of The Peripheral Mind).István Aranyosi - forthcoming - In The Peripheral Mind. Philosophy of Mind and the Peripheral Nervous System. Oxford University Press.
    The author presents an autobiographical story of serious peripheral motor nerve damage resulting from chemotoxicity induced as a side effect of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma treatment. The first-person, phenomenological account of the condition naturally leads to philosophical questions about consciousness, felt presence of oneself all over and within one’s body, and the felt constitutiveness of peripheral processes to one’s mental life. The first-person data only fit well with a philosophical approach to the mind that takes peripheral, bodily events and states at their (...)
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  14. Précis of How the Brain Got Language: The Mirror System Hypothesis.Michael A. Arbib - forthcoming - Language and Cognition.
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  15. Interweaving Protosign and Protospeech: Further Developments Beyond the Mirror.Michael A. Arbib - 2005 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 6 (2):145-171.
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  16. From Monkey-Like Action Recognition to Human Language: An Evolutionary Framework for Neurolinguistics.Michael A. Arbib - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):105-124.
    The article analyzes the neural and functional grounding of language skills as well as their emergence in hominid evolution, hypothesizing stages leading from abilities known to exist in monkeys and apes and presumed to exist in our hominid ancestors right through to modern spoken and signed languages. The starting point is the observation that both premotor area F5 in monkeys and Broca's area in humans contain a “mirror system” active for both execution and observation of manual actions, and that F5 (...)
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  17. Interweaving Protosign and Protospeech: Further Developments Beyond the Mirror.Michael A. Arbib - 2005 - Interaction Studies 6 (2):145-171.
  18. Grounding the Mirror System Hypothesis for the Evolution of the Language-Ready Brain.Michael A. Arbib - 2002 - In A. Cangelosi & D. Parisi (eds.), Simulating the Evolution of Language. Springer Verlag. pp. 229--254.
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  19. From Grasping to Complex Imitation: Mirror Systems on the Path to Language.Michael A. Arbib & James Bonaiuto - 2007 - Mind and Society 7 (1):43-64.
    We focus on the evolution of action capabilities which set the stage for language, rather than analyzing how further brain evolution built on these capabilities to yield a language-ready brain. Our framework is given by the Mirror System Hypothesis, which charts a progression from a monkey-like mirror neuron system (MNS) to a chimpanzee-like mirror system that supports simple imitation and thence to a human-like mirror system that supports complex imitation and language. We present the MNS2 model, a new model of (...)
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  20. Titles and Abstracts for the Pitt-London Workshop in the Philosophy of Biology and Neuroscience: September 2001.Karen Arnold, James Bogen, Ingo Brigandt, Joe Cain, Paul Griffiths, Catherine Kendig, James Lennox, Alan C. Love, Peter Machamer, Jacqueline Sullivan, Gianmatteo Mameli, Sandra Mitchell, David Papineau, Karola Stotz & D. M. Walsh - manuscript
    Titles and abstracts for the Pitt-London Workshop in the Philosophy of Biology and Neuroscience: September 2001.
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  21. When Did Mozart Become a Mozart? Neurophysiological Insight Into Behavioral Genetics.Yuri I. Arshavsky - 2003 - Brain and Mind 4 (3):327-339.
    The prevailing concept in modern cognitive neuroscience is that cognitive functions are performed predominantly at the network level, whereas the role of individual neurons is unlikely to extend beyond forming the simple basic elements of these networks. Within this conceptual framework, individuals of outstanding cognitive abilities appear as a result of a favorable configuration of the microarchitecture of the cognitive-implicated networks, whose final formation in ontogenesis may occur in a relatively random way. Here I suggest an alternative concept, which is (...)
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  22. Psychology’s Territories: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives From Different Disciplines.Mitchell G. Ash & Thomas Sturm (eds.) - 2007 - Erlbaum.
    This is an interdisciplinary collection of new essays by philosophers, psychologists, neuroscientists and historians on the question: What has determined and what should determine the territory or the boundaries of the discipline named "psychology"? Both the contents - in terms of concepts - and the methods - in terms of instruments - are analyzed. Among the contributors are Mitchell Ash, Paul Baltes, Jochen Brandtstädter, Gerd Gigerenzer, Michael Heidelberger, Gerhard Roth, and Thomas Sturm.
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  23. Interfacing Religion and the Neurosciences: A Review of Twenty-Five Years of Exploration and Reflection. [REVIEW]James B. Ashbrook - 1996 - Zygon 31 (4):545-572.
  24. Neurotheology: The Working Brain and the Work of Theology.James B. Ashbrook - 1984 - Zygon 19 (3):331-350.
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  25. Evolutionary Psychology's Grain Problem and the Cognitive Neuroscience of Reasoning.Anthony P. Atkinson & M. Wheeler - 2003 - In David E. Over (ed.), Evolution and the Psychology of Thinking: The Debate. Psychology Press. pp. 61--99.
  26. Mental States as Macrostates Emerging From Brain Electrical Dynamics.Harald Atmanspacher - unknown
    Psychophysiological correlations form the basis for different medical and scientific disciplines, but the nature of this relation has not yet been fully understood. One conceptual option is to understand the mental as “emerging” from neural processes in the specific sense that psychology and physiology provide two different descriptions of the same system. Stating these descriptions in terms of coarser- and finer-grained system states macro- and microstates, the two descriptions may be equally adequate if the coarse-graining preserves the possibility to obtain (...)
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  27. Acategoriality as Mental Instability.Harald Atmanspacher - 2005 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 26 (3):181.
    Mental representations are based upon categories in which the state of a mental system is stable. Acategorial states, on the other hand, are distinguished by unstable behavior. A refined and compact terminology for the description of categorial and acategorial mental states and their stability properties is introduced within the framework of the theory of dynamical systems. The relevant concepts are illustrated by selected empirical observations in cognitive neuroscience. Alterations of the category of the first person singular and features of creative (...)
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  28. Contra Classical Causality Violating Temporal Bell Inequalities in Mental Systems.Harald Atmanspacher & Thomas Filk - 2012 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (5-6):5-6.
    Temporally non-local measurements -- single measurements yielding information about the state of a system at different instances-- may provide a way to observe non-classical behaviour in mental systems. The signature for such behaviour is a violation of temporal Bell inequalities. We present such inequalities applicable to scenarios with two alternating mental states, such as in the perception of ambiguous figures. We indicate empirical options for testing temporal Bell inequalities, and speculate about possible explanations in case these inequalities are indeed violated.
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  29. The Mind and the Immune System.Rudy E. Ballieux - 1994 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (4).
    Stress-induced brain-mediated immunoregulation is effected by two pathways: autonomic outflow and (neuro)endocrine outflow. Particular attention is given to the interaction-effects of chronic an acute stress. Recent data have established that cells of the immune system produce neuro-peptides and hormones. In concert with cytokines released by these immune cells the brain can be informed on the nature of ongoing immune activity. The significance of conditioning of immune responses is discussed.
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  30. Which Grammar has Been Chosen for Neurological Feasibility?Zoltán Bánréti - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):21-22.
    Grodzinsky's hypotheses need different theories of grammar for comprehension and for production. These predictions are undesirable. Hungarian data are incompatible with the Trace Deletion Hypothesis.
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  31. Neuroscience and the Person: Scientific Perspectives on Divine Action.Ian G. Barbour - 1999 - Notre Dame: University Notre Dame Press.
  32. Neuroscience, Artificial Intelligence, and Human Nature: Theological and Philosophical Reflections.Ian G. Barbour - 1999 - In Zygon. Notre Dame: University Notre Dame Press. pp. 361-398.
  33. Imitation and Mirror Self-Recognition May Be Developmental Precursors to Theory of Mind in Human and Nonhuman Primates.Kim A. Bard - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):115-115.
    Heyes argues that nonhuman primates are unable to imitate, recognize themselves in mirrors, and take another's perspective, and that none of these capabilities are evidence for theory of mind. First, her evaluation of the evidence, especially for imitation and mirror self-recognition, is inaccurate. Second, she neglects to address the important developmental evidence that these capabilities are necessary precursors in the development of theory of mind.
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  34. After All, It’s Still Replication: A Reply to Jacob on Simulation and Mirror Neurons.Luca Barlassina - 2011 - Res Cogitans 8 (1):92-111.
    Mindreading is the ability to attribute mental states to other individuals. According to the simulation theory (ST), mindreading is based on the ability the mind has of replicating others' mental states and processes. Mirror neurons (MNs) are a class of neurons that fire both when an agent performs a goal-directed action and when she observes the same type of action performed by another individual. Since MNs appear to form a replicative mechanism in which a portion of the observer's brain replicates (...)
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  35. Cortex Excitability, Epilepsy and Brain Illness: Which Are Their Correct Relationships?Massimo Barrella - 2008 - Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences 1 (1):37-39.
    In their work Gilio et al. investigate the mechanisms involved in the regulation of excitability of the cortex in epileptic subjects, and in particular their epileptogenic threshold.
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  36. Predictive Neural Model of an Osmotic Dehydration Process. Barrera-Cortés, Genina-Soto & Baruch - 2005 - Journal of Intelligent Systems 14 (2-3):143-156.
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  37. The Neuroscience of Social Understanding.John Barresi - 2008 - The Shared Mind 1:39–66.
    In J. Zlatev, T. Racine, C. Sinha and E. Itkonen (Eds.) The Shared Mind: Perspectives on Intersubjectivity, Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins, in press.
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  38. Process Approaches to Consciousness in Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind.Nathaniel F. Barrett - 2011 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 32 (2):197-200.
    I imagine that many readers of AJTP will find it hard to get excited about a new collection of essays about consciousness from the process perspective, no matter how good it is purported to be, because they are bored with the so-called "problem of consciousness" and uninterested in playing the role of the choir for what looks like a lot of old-fashioned Whiteheadian preaching. But in fact this book was conceived with the intention to do much more than preach to (...)
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  39. Neuroscientists Need to Be Evolutionarily Challenged.Robert A. Barton - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (1):13-14.
    Evolutionary theory and methods are central to understanding the design of organisms, including their brains. This book does much to demonstrate the value of evolutionary neuroscience. Further work is needed to clarify the ways that neural systems evolved in general (specifically, the interaction between mosaic and coordinated evolution of brain components), and phylogenetic methods should be given a more prominent role in the analysis of comparative data.
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  40. The Epistemology of Evidence in Cognitive Neuroscience.William P. Bechtel - forthcoming - In R. Skipper Jr, C. Allen, R. A. Ankeny, C. F. Craver, L. Darden, G. Mikkelson & and R. Richardson (eds.), Philosophy and the Life Sciences: A Reader. MIT Press.
    It is no secret that scientists argue. They argue about theories. But even more, they argue about the evidence for theories. Is the evidence itself trustworthy? This is a bit surprising from the perspective of traditional empiricist accounts of scientific methodology according to which the evidence for scientific theories stems from observation, especially observation with the naked eye. These accounts portray the testing of scientific theories as a matter of comparing the predictions of the theory with the data generated by (...)
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  41. Philosophy and the Neurosciences: A Reader.William P. Bechtel, Pete Mandik, Jennifer Mundale & Robert S. Stufflebeam (eds.) - 2001 - Blackwell.
    2. Daugman, J. G. Brain metaphor and brain theory 3. Mundale, J. Neuroanatomical Foundations of Cognition: Connecting the Neuronal Level with the Study of Higher Brain Areas.
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  42. Epistemic Issues in Procuring Evidence About the Brain: The Importance of Research Instruments and Techniques.William P. Bechtel & Robert S. Stufflebeam - 2001 - In William P. Bechtel, Pete Mandik, Jennifer Mundale & Robert S. Stufflebeam (eds.), Philosophy and the Neurosciences: A Reader. Blackwell. pp. 55--81.
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  43. Philosophy Meets the Neurosciences.William Bechtel, Pete Mandik & Jennifer Mundale - 2001 - In William P. Bechtel, Pete Mandik, Jennifer Mundale & Robert S. Stufflebeam (eds.), Philosophy and the Neurosciences: A Reader. Blackwell.
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  44. Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience.M. R. Bennett & P. M. S. Hacker - 2003 - Wiley-Blackwell.
  45. Neuroscience and Philosophy: Brain, Mind, and Language.M. Bennett, D. C. Dennett, P. M. S. Hacker & J. R. & Searle (eds.) - 2007 - Columbia University Press.
    "Neuroscience and Philosophy" begins with an excerpt from "Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience," in which Maxwell Bennett and Peter Hacker question the ...
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  46. Neuroscience and Philosophy: Brain, Mind, and Language.Maxwell Bennett, Daniel Dennett, Peter Hacker, John Searle & Daniel N. Robinson - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    In _Neuroscience and Philosophy_ three prominent philosophers and a leading neuroscientist clash over the conceptual presuppositions of cognitive neuroscience. The book begins with an excerpt from Maxwell Bennett and Peter Hacker's _Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience_, which questions the conceptual commitments of cognitive neuroscientists. Their position is then criticized by Daniel Dennett and John Searle, two philosophers who have written extensively on the subject, and Bennett and Hacker in turn respond. Their impassioned debate encompasses a wide range of central themes: the (...)
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  47. Seeing Wood Because of the Trees? A Case of Failure in Reverse-Engineering.Philip J. Benson - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):468-468.
    Failure to take note of distinctive attributes in the distal stimulus leads to an inadequate proximal encoding. Representation of similarities in Chorus suffers in this regard. Distinctive qualities may require additional complex representation (e.g., reference to linguistic terms) in order to facilitate discrimination. Additional semantic information, which configures proximal attributes, permits accurate identification of true veridical stimuli.
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  48. Why the TDH Fails to Contribute to a Neurology of Syntax.Alan Beretta - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):23-23.
    An important part of Grodzinsky's claim regarding the neurology of syntax depends on agrammatic data partitioned by the Trace Deletion Hypothesis (TDH), which is a combination of trace-deletion and default strategy. However, there is convincing evidence that the default strategy is consistently avoided by agrammatics. The TDH, therefore, is in no position to support claims about agrammatic data or the neurology of syntax.
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  49. Functional Independence and Cognitive Architecture.Vincent Bergeron - 2016 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 67 (3):817-836.
    In cognitive science, the concept of dissociation has been central to the functional individuation and decomposition of cognitive systems. Setting aside debates about the legitimacy of inferring the existence of dissociable systems from ‘behavioural’ dissociation data, the main idea behind the dissociation approach is that two cognitive systems are dissociable, and thus viewed as distinct, if each can be damaged, or impaired, without affecting the other system’s functions. In this article, I propose a notion of functional independence that does not (...)
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  50. Neural Macrostates.R. M. Bergstrom - 1967 - Synthese 17 (December):425-443.
1 — 50 / 548