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  1. Review of 'Theoretical Virtues in Science' by Samuel Schindler. [REVIEW]Darren Bradley - manuscript
  2. Russell's 1927 The Analysis of Matter as the First Book on Quantum Gravity.Said Mikki - manuscript
    The goal of this note is to bring into wider attention the often neglected important work by Bertrand Russell on the foundations of physics published in the late 1920s. In particular, we emphasize how the book The Analysis of Matter can be considered the earliest systematic attempt to unify the modern quantum theory, just emerging by that time, with general relativity. More importantly, it is argued that the idea of what I call Russell space, introduced in Part III of that (...)
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  3. El Corpus Hipocrático y la historia de la medicina como institución social.Biani Paola Sánchez López -
  4. A Current Perspective on Science, Scientists and "Scientific Temper": Busting Myths and Misconceptions.Bimal Prasad Mahapatra -
    This article is devoted to define and characterize ‘Science’ as a discipline by the fundamental principles of scientific investigation. In particular, we propose and argue that ‘Science’ be defined by a set of principles / criteria which underlies scientific- investigation. We argue that this set must include the following principles: (1) Rationality, (2) Objectivity (3) Universality, (4) Internal Consistency, (5) Uniqueness, (6) Reproducibility, (7) The Principle of Falsification, (8) Simplicity and Elegance and (9) Experimental Observation and Verification. We elaborate, through (...)
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  5. Cristina Chimisso, Hélène Metzger, Historian and Historiographer of the Sciences. [REVIEW]Oscar Moro Abadía - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
  6. The Ultimate Think Tank: The Rise of the Santa Fe Institute Libertarian.Erik Baker - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269512110689.
    Why do corporations and wealthy philanthropists fund the human sciences? Examining the history of the Santa Fe Institute, a private research institute founded in the early 1980s, this article shows that funders can find as much value in the social worlds of the sciences they sponsor as in their ideas. SFI became increasingly dependent on funding from corporations and libertarian business leaders in the 1990s and 2000s. At the same time, its intellectual work came to focus on the underlying principles (...)
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  7. History of the Human Sciences.Richard Bellamy, Peter M. Logan, John I. Brooks Iii, David Couzens Hoy, Michael Donnelly & James M. Glass - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences.
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  8. Annie Petit. Le Système D’Auguste Comte: De la Science À la Religion Par la Philosophie. Paris: Vrin, 2016. Pp. 389. €32.00. [REVIEW]Anastasios Brenner - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
  9. Hélène Metzger on Precursors: A Historian and Philosopher of Science Confronts Her Evil Demon.Cristina Chimisso & Nick Jardine - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
  10. Avicenna and the Contest of Healing: Medical Crises and the Body Politic Metaphor in the Canon of Medicine.Glen Cooper - forthcoming - In Kadircan H. Keskinbora (ed.), Revisiting Ibn Sina’s Heritage. Bern, Switzerland:
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  11. Positivism in Action: The Case of Louis Rougier.Fons Dewulf & Massimiliano Simons - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 11 (2).
    In this paper, we investigate how the life and work of Louis Rougier relate to the broader political dimension of logical empiricist philosophy. We focus on three practical projects of Rougier in the 1930s and 1940s. First, his attempts to integrate French-speaking philosophers into an international network of scientific philosophers by organizing two Unity of Science conferences in Paris. Second, his role in the renewal of liberalism through the organization of the Walter Lippmann Colloquium. Third, Rougier’s attempts at political negotiations (...)
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  12. Sciences: An Attempt to Lay a Foundation for the Study of Society and History, Hemel Hempstead: Harvester/Wheatsheaf, 1989, Paper£ 10.95, 386 Pp. [REVIEW]Wilhelm Dilthey - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences.
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  13. Andrea Strazzoni. Dutch Cartesianism and the Birth of Philosophy of Science: From Regius to ’s Gravesande. [REVIEW]Mihnea Dobre - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
  14. Emily Herring, Kevin Matthew Jones, Konstantin S. Kiprijanov, and Laura M. Sellers, Eds., The Past, Present, and Future of Integrated History and Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW]Kate Dorsch - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
  15. Reviews : Paul Veyne , A History of Private Life, Volume I: From Pagan Rome to Byzantium, Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1987, £24.95, Ix + 670 Pp. [REVIEW] E. Hunt - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:297-301.
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  16. Bones Without Flesh and (Trans)Gender Without Bodies: Querying Desires for Trans Historicity.Avery Everhart - forthcoming - Hypatia.
    In 2011 a 5000 year old 'male' skeleton buried in a 'female' way was discovered by an archaeological team just outside of modern-day Prague. This paper queries the impulse to name such a discovery as evidence of transgender identity, and bodies, in an increasingly ancient past. To do so, it takes up the work of Denise Ferreira da Silva, Sylvia Wynters, and Hortense Spillers as a means to push back against the impetus of naming such discoveries as transgender in order (...)
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  17. Ingold’s Animism and European Science.Jeff Kochan - forthcoming - Perspectives on Science:1-66.
    Anthropologist Tim Ingold promotes Indigenous animism as a salve for perceived failures in modern science, failures he claims also hobbled his own early work. In fact, both Ingold’s early and later work rely on modern scientific ideas and images. His turn to animism marks not an exit from the history of European science, but an entrance into, and imaginative elaboration of, distinctly Neoplatonic themes within that history. This turn marks, too, a clear but unacknowledged departure from systematic social analysis. By (...)
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  18. Confronting the Field: Tylor's Anahuac and Victorian Thought on Human Diversity.Chiara Lacroix - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269512110695.
    Victorian anthropologists have been nicknamed ‘armchair anthropologists’. Yet some of them did set foot in the field. Edward Burnett Tylor's first published work, Anahuac, or Mexico and the Mexicans, Ancient and Modern, described his youthful travels in Mexico. Tylor's confrontation with the ‘field’ revealed significant in tensions between the different beliefs and attitudes that Tylor held towards Mexican society. Contrasts between the evidence of Mexico's history and the present-day society of the 1850s led Tylor to see both progress and degeneration (...)
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  19. Dmitri Levitin, Ancient Wisdom in the Age of the New Science. Histories of Philosophy in England, C. 1640-1700. [REVIEW]Mogens Laerke - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
  20. Revaluing Laws of Nature in Secularized Science.Eli I. Lichtenstein - forthcoming - In Yemima Ben-Menahem (ed.), Rethinking the Concept of Laws of Nature. Springer.
    Discovering laws of nature was a way to worship a law-giving God, during the Scientific Revolution. So why should we consider it worthwhile now, in our own more secularized science? For historical perspective, I examine two competing early modern theological traditions that related laws of nature to different divine attributes, and their secular legacy in views ranging from Kant and Nietzsche to Humean and ‘governing’ accounts in recent analytic metaphysics. Tracing these branching offshoots of ethically charged God-concepts sheds light on (...)
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  21. Photo Mensura.Patrick Maynard - forthcoming - In Nicola Moeßner & Alfred Nordmann (eds.), The Epistemology of Measurement: Representational and Technological Dimensions. Routledge.
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  22. Department of Sociology and Anthropology University ofGuelph.Ken Menzies - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences.
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  23. Michael J. Sauter. The Spatial Reformation: Euclid Between Man, Cosmos, and God. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019. Pp. 327. $89.95 (Cloth). ISBN 978-0-812-25066-4. [REVIEW]David Marshall Miller - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
  24. Michael Heidelberger, Helmut Pulte, and Gregor Schiemann, eds. Hermann von Helmholtz. Philosophische und Populärwissenschaftliche Schriften. [REVIEW]Alfred Nordmann - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
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  25. Canonizing Cavendish.Alison Peterman - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
  26. The Paradigms in Philosophy and History of Science.Stefano Poggi - forthcoming - Hegel-Studien.
  27. Plato on Natural Kinds: The Promethean Method of the Philebus.John Proios - forthcoming - Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science.
    Plato’s invention of the metaphor of carving the world by the joints (Phaedrus 265d-66c) gives him a privileged place in the history of natural kind theory in philosophy and science; he is often understood to present a paradigmatic but antiquated view of natural kinds as possessing eternal, immutable, necessary essences. Yet, I highlight that, as a point of distinction from contemporary views about natural kinds, Plato subscribes to an intelligent-design, teleological framework, in which the natural world is the product of (...)
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  28. Department of Sociology University of Edinburgh.Stanley Raffel - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences.
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  29. New Philosophical Perspectives on Scientific Progress.Yafeng Shan (ed.) - forthcoming - New York: Routledge.
    This collection of original essays offers a comprehensive examination of scientific progress, which has been a central topic in recent debates in philosophy of science. Traditionally, debates concerning scientific progress have focused on different methodological approaches, notably the epistemic and semantic approaches. The chapters in Part I of the book defend these two traditional approaches, as well as the newly revived functional and newly developed understanding-based approaches. Part II features in-depth case studies of scientific progress from the history of science. (...)
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  30. David Owen Foucault, Habermas and the Claims of Reason 119.Charles Turner & Dick Pels - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences.
  31. Measuring Non-Han Bodies: Anthropometry, Colonialism, and Biopower in China's South-Western Borderland in the 1930s and 1940s.Jing Zhu - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269512110499.
    This article examines the biopower of non-Han bodies by considering the intersections of anthropology, racial science, and colonial regimes. During the 1930s and 1940s, when extensive anthropometric research was being undertaken on non-Han populations in the south-western borderlands of China, several anthropologists studied non-Han groups under the aegis of frontier administration. Chinese scholars sought to generate the physical characteristics of ethnic minority groups in the south-west of China, through the methodology of body measurement, in order to identify forms of social (...)
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  32. Ursula Klein. Technoscience in History: Prussia, 1750–1850. 336 Pp., 24 Figs. Cambridge, Mass./London: MIT Press, 2020. $40 (Paper); ISBN 9780262539296. E-Book Available. [REVIEW]Patrick Anthony - 2022 - Isis 113 (1):187-189.
  33. Revisiting the ‘Darwin–Marx Correspondence’: Multiple Discovery and the Rhetoric of Priority.Joel Barnes - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):29-54.
    Between the 1930s and the mid 1970s, it was commonly believed that in 1880 Karl Marx had proposed to dedicate to Charles Darwin a volume or translation of Capital but that Darwin had refused. The detail was often interpreted by scholars as having larger significance for the question of the relationship between Darwinian evolutionary biology and Marxist political economy. In 1973–4, two scholars working independently—Lewis Feuer, professor of sociology at Toronto, and Margaret Fay, a graduate student at Berkeley—determined simultaneously that (...)
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  34. Henry M. Cowles. The Scientific Method: An Evolution of Thinking From Darwin to Dewey. 384 Pp., Notes, Index. Cambridge, Mass./London: Harvard University Press, 2020. $35 (Cloth); ISBN 9780674976191. [REVIEW]Alisa Bokulich & Federica Bocchi - 2022 - Isis 113 (1):196-197.
  35. John Augustus Abayomi Cole and the Search for an African Science, 1885–1898.Colin Bos - 2022 - Isis 113 (1):63-84.
  36. Introduction: What Is a Field? Transformations in Fields, Fieldwork, and Field Sciences Since the Mid-Twentieth Century.Cameron Brinitzer & Etienne Benson - 2022 - Isis 113 (1):108-113.
    In recent decades, scholarship in the history of science has explored the emergence and development of sciences in which fields serve as privileged sites of knowledge production. Much of this work has focused on the field sciences’ formative period from the late nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century, and it is the definitions of the field, fieldwork, and field science emerging from the study of this period that have come to dominate the historical literature. Those definitions cannot, however, account for (...)
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  37. Surgery, Success, and the Role of the Patient in Cleft Palate Operations, Circa 1800–1930.Claire Brock - 2022 - Isis 113 (1):22-44.
    In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, scientific and technological developments made surgery safer, more reliable, and, with the corresponding increase in experimentation permitted, more exploratory and successful than ever before. The age of the heroic surgeon, however, obscured procedures that relied on the patient’s cooperation for a final, positive outcome. This essay focuses on the debates surrounding cleft palate surgery in Britain, Europe, and North America between about 1800 and 1930, where the constancy of failure dogged the surgeon, even (...)
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  38. Whose Home Is the Field?Rosanna Dent - 2022 - Isis 113 (1):137-143.
    Twentieth-century field research in the human sciences has repeatedly rendered specific communities and people as subjects of study. As scientists layered field upon field in the same spaces, subjects have gained their own forms of expertise. This essay examines the history of research in Terra Indígena Pimentel Barbosa, in what is now Central Brazil, to argue that fields are composed of human relations and that historians of science have the moral responsibility to recognize that fields are almost always someone’s home. (...)
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  39. Elliott Bowen. In Search of Sexual Health: Diagnosing and Treating Syphilis in Hot Springs, Arkansas, 1890–1940. 232 Pp., Illus., Notes, Index. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2020. $49.95 (Cloth); ISBN 9781421438566. E-Book Available. [REVIEW]Deborah Doroshow - 2022 - Isis 113 (1):197-199.
  40. From Cohort to Community: The Emotional Work of Birthday Cards in the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development, 1946–2018.Hannah J. Elizabeth & Daisy Payling - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):158-188.
    The Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development is Britain’s longest-running birth cohort study. From their birth in 1946 until the present day, its research participants, or study members, have filled out questionnaires and completed cognitive or physical examinations every few years. Among other outcomes, the findings of these studies have framed how we understand health inequalities. Throughout the decades and multiple follow-up studies, each year the study members have received a birthday card from the survey staff. Although (...)
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  41. Rienk Vermij. Thinking on Earthquakes in Early Modern Europe: Firm Beliefs on Shaky Ground. 266 Pp. London: Routledge, 2020. $44.95 (Paper); ISBN 9780367492182. Cloth and E-Book Available. [REVIEW]Fa-ti Fan - 2022 - Isis 113 (1):180-181.
  42. A “Physiogony” of the Heavens: Kant’s Early View of Universal Natural History.Cinzia Ferrini - 2022 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 12 (1):261-285.
    From 1754 to 1756 Kant wrote on such central, related topics as the axial rotation of the Earth, the theory of heat, and the composition of matter, focusing on space, force, and motion. It has been noted that each of these topics pertains to his 1755 Universal Natural History and Theory of the Heavens, in which he drew on extant cosmogonies and the analogical form of Newtonianism developed by naturalists including Buffon, Haller, and Thomas Wright. How does Kant build on (...)
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  43. Henry R. Frankel.Mott T. Greene & George Gale - 2022 - Isis 113 (1):157-159.
  44. Social Science and Marxist Humanism Beyond Collectivism in Socialist Romania.Adela Hîncu - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):77-100.
    This article brings together the history of the social sciences and the history of social thought in Socialist Romania. It is concerned with the development of ideas about the social beyond collectivism, especially about the relationship between individual and society under socialism, from the early 1960s to the end of the 1970s. The analysis speaks to three major themes in the current historiography of Cold War social science. First, the article investigates the role of disciplinary specialization in the advancement of (...)
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  45. Not Merely the Absence of Disease: A Genealogy of the WHO’s Positive Health Definition.Lars Thorup Larsen - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (1):111-131.
    The 1948 constitution of the World Health Organization defines health as ‘a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity’. It was a bold and revolutionary health idea to gain international consensus in a period characterized by fervent anti-communism. This article explores the genealogy of the health definition and demonstrates how it was possible to expand the scope of health, redefine it as ‘well-being’, and overcome ideological resistance to progressive and international (...)
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  46. Pankaj Sekhsaria. Nanoscale: Society’s Deep Impact on Science, Technology, and Innovation in India. 182 Pp., Notes, Refs. Bombay: AuthorsUpFront, 2020. ₹495 (Cloth); ISBN 9387280705. E-Book Available. [REVIEW]John B. Lourdusamy - 2022 - Isis 113 (1):216-217.
  47. To the Editors.Kristie Macrakis - 2022 - Isis 113 (1):160-160.
  48. Francis Bacon Y René Descartes acerca Del dominio de la naturaleza, la autoconservación Y la medicina.Silvia Manzo - 2022 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 63 (151):99-119.
    RESUMEN Francis Bacon y René Descartes han sido presentados tradicionalmente como pioneros de corrientes filosóficas opuestas entre sí. Sin embargo, son cada vez más los estudios que muestran importantes continuidades entre sus filosofías. Este artículo explora una de ellas: sus perspectivas sobre la medicina. El dominio sobre la naturaleza y el instinto de autoconservación son los elementos centrales del marco teórico dentro del cual se inserta su valoración de la medicina como la disciplina más destacada por sus beneficios para el (...)
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  49. A Wine a Day …: Medical Experts and Expertise in Plutarch’s Table Talk.Michiel Meeusen - 2022 - Early Science and Medicine 27 (1):83-113.
    This contribution examines the important role that medical experts and expertise played at convivial networking events in the High Roman Empire, as imagined by a non-specialist in the field, viz. the famous Platonist intellectual Plutarch of Chaeronea. An analysis of a number of medical problems discussed in his Table Talk will yield fresh insights into the social and intellectual role which doctors, as members of the educated elite, were expected to play in convivial community contexts and also how popular or (...)
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  50. Toward a Philosophy of Scientific Discovery.Jan G. Michel - 2022 - In Making Scientific Discoveries: Interdisciplinary Reflections. Paderborn, Deutschland: pp. 9-53.
    Jan G. Michel argues that we need a philosophy of scientific discovery. Before turning to the question of what such a philosophy might look like, he addresses two questions: Don’t we have a philosophy of scientific discovery yet? And do we need one at all? To answer the first question, he takes a closer look at history and finds that we have not had a systematic philosophy of scientific discovery worthy of the name for over 150 years. To answer the (...)
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1 — 50 / 4537