6 found

Year:

  1.  8
    ‘He Was Wearing Street Clothes, Not Pyjamas’: Common Mistakes in Lawyers’ Assessment of Legal Capacity for Vulnerable Older Clients.Lise Barry - 2018 - Legal Ethics 21 (1):3-22.
    ABSTRACTLawyers are increasingly called upon to deal with older clients and have ethical responsibilities to attest to their capacity for legal decision-making. As witnesses to enduring documents, the making of wills and other significant advance planning transactions, lawyers play a role in preventing elder abuse and in upholding the rights of older people. To date however, there has been very little empirical research examining how lawyers assess an older person’s legal decision-making capacity. This article presents research examining three years of (...)
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  2.  5
    Interviewing Real Clients and the Ways It Deepens Students’ Understandings of Legal Ethics.Anna Cody - 2018 - Legal Ethics 21 (1):46-69.
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  3.  1
    Challenge and Change in the Canadian Legal Profession.Adam Dodek - 2018 - Legal Ethics 21 (1):89-92.
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  4.  2
    Lawyer Independence Under the Spotlight in Australia.Suzanne Le Mire - 2018 - Legal Ethics 21 (1):93-95.
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  5.  2
    Elder Abuse and Lawyers’ Ethical Responsibilities: Incorporating Screening Into Practice.Nola M. Ries - 2018 - Legal Ethics 21 (1):23-45.
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  6. Deferring to the ‘Unlearned’ Friend: Professional Ethics and the Unrepresented Litigant.Rachel Spencer - 2018 - Legal Ethics 21 (1):70-88.
    ABSTRACTCourts are starting to keep data about the numbers of litigants who personally file court documents and appear without counsel. The growth in numbers of unrepresented litigants is aptly described as a phenomenon and can be attributed to various causes. Whether or not it is a ‘problem’ however, is arguable. This article explores the concept of the unrepresented litigant in a strange and unnavigable milieu and the ethical duties of lawyers as officers of the court in that context. Focussing on (...)
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