Does evolutionary biology contribute to ethics?

Biology and Philosophy 4 (3):287-301 (1989)

Abstract

Human propensities that are the products of Darwinian evolution may combine to generate a form of social behavior that is not itself a direct result of such pressure. This possibility may provide a satisfying explanation for the origin of socially transmitted rules such as the incest taboo. Similarly, the regulatory processes of development that generated adaptations to the environment in the circumstances in which they evolved can produce surprising and sometimes maladaptive consequences for the individual in modern conditions. These combinatorial aspects of social and developmental dynamics leave a subtle but not wholly uninteresting role for evolutionary biology in explaining the origins of human morality

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References found in this work

On Human Nature.Edward O. Wilson - 1978 - Harvard University Press.
Darwinism and Human Affairs.Terence Ball - 1981 - Ethics 92 (1):161-162.
Genes, Mind and Culture. [REVIEW]Alex Rosenberg - 1983 - Journal of Philosophy 80 (5):304-311.

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