Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):519-528 (2012)

Authors
Ebrahim Moosa
Duke University
Abstract
Muslim ethics is cautiously engaging developments in neuroscience. In their encounters with developments in neuroscience such as brain death and functional magnetic resonance imaging procedures, Muslim ethicists might be on the cusp of spirited debates. Science and religion perform different kinds of work and ought not to be conflated. Cultural translation is central to negotiating the complex life worlds of religious communities, Muslims included. Cultural translation involves lived encounters with modernity and its byproduct, modern science. Serious ethical debate requires more than just a mere instrumental encounter with science. A robust Muslim approach to neuroethics might require an emulsion of religion and neuroscience, thought and body, and body and soul. Yet one must anticipate that Muslim debates in neuroethics will be inflected with Muslim values, symbols and the discrete faith perspectives of this tradition with meanings that are specific to people who share this worldview and their concerns
Keywords Neuroethics  Muslim ethics  Islam  Islamic law  Islamic ethics  Neuroscience
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DOI 10.1007/s11948-012-9392-5
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Modern Social Imaginaries.Charles Taylor - 2003 - Duke University Press.
Modern Social Imaginaries.Charles Taylor - 2003 - Duke University Press.
The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature.Steven Pinker - 2002 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 66 (4):765-767.

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