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  1.  13
    Islamic perspectives on clinical intervention near the end-of-life: We can but must we?Aasim I. Padela & Omar Qureshi - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (4):545-559.
    The ever-increasing technological advances of modern medicine have increased physicians’ capacity to carry out a wide array of clinical interventions near the end-of-life. These new procedures have resulted in new “types” of living where a patient’s cognitive functions are severely diminished although many physiological functions remain active. In this biomedical context, patients, surrogate decision-makers, and clinicians all struggle with decisions about what clinical interventions to pursue and when therapeutic intent should be replaced with palliative goals of care. For some patients (...)
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    Islamic Perspectives on Clinical Intervention Near the End of Life: We Can but Must We?Aasim I. Padela & Omar Qureshi - 2019 - In Timothy D. Knepper, Lucy Bregman & Mary Gottschalk (eds.), Death and Dying : An Exercise in Comparative Philosophy of Religion. Springer Verlag. pp. 201-225.
    The ever-increasing technological advances of modern medicine have increased physicians’ capacity to carry out a wide array of clinical interventions near the end of life. These new procedures have resulted in new “types” of living where a patient’s cognitive functions are severely diminished although many physiological functions remain active. In this biomedical context, patients, surrogate decision-makers, and clinicians all struggle with decisions about what clinical interventions to pursue and when therapeutic intent should be replaced with palliative goals of care. For (...)
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  3.  27
    When must a patient seek healthcare? Bringing the perspectives of islamic jurists and clinicians into dialogue.Omar Qureshi & Aasim I. Padela - 2016 - Zygon 51 (3):592-625.
    Muslim physicians and Islamic jurists analyze the moral dimensions of biomedicine using different tools and processes. While the deliberations of these two classes of experts involve judgments about the deliverables of the other's respective fields, Islamic jurists and Muslim physicians rarely engage in discussions about the constructs and epistemic frameworks that motivate their analyses. The lack of dialogue creates gaps in knowledge and leads to imprecise guidance. In order to address these discursive and conceptual gaps we describe the sources of (...)
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