Nursing Ethics 13 (4):438-445 (2006)

Abstract
The purpose of this article is to discuss an external whistleblowing event that occurred after all internal whistleblowing through the hierarchy of the organization had failed. It is argued that an organization that does not support those that whistle blow because of violation of professional standards is indicative of a failure of organizational ethics. Several ways to build an ethics infrastructure that could reduce the need to resort to external whistleblowing are discussed. A relational ethics approach is presented as a way to eliminate the negative consequences of whistleblowing by fostering an interdependent moral community to address ethical concerns
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DOI 10.1191/0969733006ne882oa
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References found in this work BETA

Nurse Autonomy as Relational.Chris MacDonald - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (2):194-201.
The Ethical Life of Health Care Organizations.Stanley Joel Reiser - 1994 - Hastings Center Report 24 (6):28-35.

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Identifying Ethical Issues From the Perspective of the Registered Nurse.Marcia Sue DeWolf Bosek - 2009 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 11 (3):91-99.

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