This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:History/traditions: Public Health

6465 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 6465
Material to categorize
  1. Three Ways in Which Pandemic Models May Perform a Pandemic.Philippe van Basshuysen, Lucie White, Donal Khosrowi & Mathias Frisch - manuscript
    Models may not only represent, but also influence their targets in important ways. While models’ ability to influence outcomes has been studied in relation to economic models, often under the label “performativity”, we argue that this phenomenon also pertains to epidemiological models, such as those used for forecasting the trajectory of the COVID-19 pandemic. After identifying three ways in which a model by the COVID-19 Response Team at Imperial College London (Ferguson et al. 2020) may have influenced scientific advice, policy, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Comprehension of Informed Consent for Research: Issues and Directions for Future Study.Harvey A. Taub - 1986 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 8 (6):7.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3. L’allocazione delle risorse sanitarie durante la pandemia da Covid-19: un’analisi comparativa dei documenti della SIAARTI e del CNB.Davide Battisti, Luca Marelli, Mario Picozzi, Massimo Reichlin & Virginia Sanchini - 2021 - Notizie di Politeia 141:25-45.
    In Italy, during the first wave of the Covid-19 pandemic, the Italian Society of Resuscitators and Pain Therapists (SIAARTI) and the Italian National Bioethics Committee (CNB) published ethical guidance on the allocation of scarce intensive care resources. In this paper, we outline and compare these documents in detail, highlighting differences and similarities. In particular, we argue that major differences exist with respect to the principles and values underpinning the documents and the normative allocation criteria proposed. Conversely, similarities can be traced (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Jan Peter Verhave. A Constant State of Emergency: Paul de Kruif: Microbe Hunter and Health Activist. (Historical Series of the Reformed Church in America, 98.) Xxii + 656 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. Holland, Mich.: Van Raalte Press, 2020. $35 (Paper); ISBN 9781950572069. [REVIEW]Daniel J. Wilson - 2021 - Isis 112 (1):200-201.
  5. Against Personal Ventilator Reallocation.Joel Michael Reynolds, Laura Guidry-Grimes & Katie Savin - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):272-284.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has led to intense conversations about ventilator allocation and reallocation during a crisis standard of care. Multiple voices in the media and multiple state guidelines mention reallocation as a possibility. Drawing upon a range of neuroscientific, phenomenological, ethical, and sociopolitical considerations, the authors argue that taking away someone’s personal ventilator is a direct assault on their bodily and social integrity. They conclude that personal ventilators should not be part of reallocation pools and that triage protocols should be (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. If Fetuses Are Persons, Abortion is a Public Health Crisis.Bruce Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2021 - Bioethics 1:1-14.
    Pro-life advocates commonly argue that fetuses have the moral status of persons, and an accompanying right to life, a view most pro-choice advocates deny. A difficulty for this pro-life position has been Judith Jarvis Thomson’s violinist analogy, in which she argues that even if the fetus is a person, abortion is often permissible because a pregnant woman is not obliged to continue to offer her body as life support. Here, we outline the moral theories underlying public health ethics, and examine (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Field Notes.Nancy Berlinger - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (5):i-i.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Privacy Versus Public Health? A Reassessment of Centralised and Decentralised Digital Contact Tracing.Lucie White & Philippe van Basshuysen - 2021 - Science and Engineering Ethics 27 (2):1-13.
    At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, high hopes were placed on digital contact tracing. Digital contact tracing apps can now be downloaded in many countries, but as further waves of COVID-19 tear through much of the northern hemisphere, these apps are playing a less important role in interrupting chains of infection than anticipated. We argue that one of the reasons for this is that most countries have opted for decentralised apps, which cannot provide a means of rapidly informing users (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Emerging From Lockdown - What Went Wrong?Philippe van Basshuysen & Lucie White - manuscript
    As many Western countries emerged from initial periods of lockdown in spring 2020, they had brought COVID-19 infection rates down significantly. This was followed, however, with more drastic second and third waves of viral spread, which many of these same countries are struggling to bring under control, even with the implementation of further periods of lockdown. Could this have been prevented by policymakers? We revisit two strategies that were focus of much discussion during the early stages of the pandemic, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Science and Policy in Extremis: The UK's Initial Response to COVID-19.Jonathan Birch - manuscript
    Drawing on the SAGE minutes and other documents, I consider the wider lessons for norms of scientific advising that can be learned from the UK’s initial response to coronavirus in the period January-March 2020. I highlight three key issues: the normative force of scientific advice, the role of reasonable worst-case scenarios, and the limits of independence and neutrality. A recurring theme is the difference between normal scientific advising and scientific advising in extremis, when a significant fraction of a country’s population (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Clinical Reasoning: Knowledge, Uncertainty, and Values in Health Care.Daniele Chiffi - 2021 - Cham: Springer.
    This book offers a philosophically-based, yet clinically-oriented perspective on current medical reasoning aiming at 1) identifying important forms of uncertainty permeating current clinical reasoning and practice 2) promoting the application of an abductive methodology in the health context in order to deal with those clinical uncertainties 3) bridging the gap between biomedical knowledge, clinical practice, and research and values in both clinical and philosophical literature. With a clear philosophical emphasis, the book investigates themes lying at the border between several disciplines, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Why Should HCWs Receive Priority Access to Vaccines in a Pandemic?Xavier Symons, Steve Matthews & Bernadette Tobin - unknown
    Background Viral pandemics present a range of ethical challenges for policy makers, not the least among which are difficult decisions about how to allocate scarce healthcare resources. One important question is whether healthcare workers (HCWs) should receive priority access to a vaccine in the event that an effective vaccine becomes available. This question is especially relevant in the coronavirus pandemic as governments and health authorities prepare to distribute a COVID-19 vaccine. Main text In this article, we critically evaluate the most (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Rural Bioethics: The Alaska Context.Fritz Allhoff & Luke Golemon - 2020 - HEC Forum 32 (4):313-331.
    With by far the lowest population density in the United States, myriad challenges attach to healthcare delivery in Alaska. In the “Size, Population, and Accessibility” section, we characterize this geographic context, including how it is exacerbated by lack of infrastructure. In the “Distributing Healthcare” section, we turn to healthcare economics and staffing, showing how these bear on delivery—and are exacerbated by geography. In the “Health Care in Rural Alaska” section, we turn to rural care, exploring in more depth what healthcare (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. Implementing U.S. Covid-19 Testing: Regulatory and Infrastructural Challenges.Yongtian Tina Tan & Aaron S. Kesselheim - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (3):608-612.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Legal “Tug-of-Wars” During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Public Health V. Economic Prosperity.James G. Hodge, Sarah Wetter, Emily Carey, Elyse Pendergrass, Claudia M. Reeves & Hanna Reinke - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (3):603-607.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. Designing Policy Solutions to Build a Healthier Rural America.Sameer Vohra, Carolyn Pointer, Amanda Fogleman, Thomas Albers, Anish Patel & Elizabeth Weeks - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (3):491-505.
    Disparities exist in the health, livelihood, and opportunities for the 46-60 million people living in America’s rural communities. Rural communities across the United States need a new energy and focus concentrated around health and health care that allows for the designing capturing, and spreading of existing and new innovations. This paper aims to provide a framework for policy solutions to build a healthier rural America describing both the current state of rural health policy and the policies and practices in states (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. Pandemic Preparedness and Cooperative Justice.Cristian Timmermann - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
    By examining the global public good nature of pandemic preparedness we can identify key social justice issues that need to be confronted to increase citizens’ voluntary compliance with prevention and mitigation measures. As people tend to cooperate on a voluntary basis only with systems they consider fair, it becomes difficult to ensure compliance with public health measures in a context of extreme inequality. Among the major inequalities that need to be addressed we can find major differences in the extensiveness and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Decision-Making Capacity.Jennifer Hawkins & Louis C. Charland - 2020 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Decision-Making Capacity First published Tue Jan 15, 2008; substantive revision Fri Aug 14, 2020 In many Western jurisdictions the law presumes that adult persons, and sometimes children that meet certain criteria, are capable of making their own medical decisions; for example, consenting to a particular medical treatment, or consenting to participate in a research trial. But what exactly does it mean to say that a subject has or lacks the requisite capacity to decide? This question has to do with what (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. Your Health Vs. My Liberty: Philosophical Beliefs Dominated Reflection and Identifiable Victim Effects When Predicting Public Health Recommendation Compliance During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Nick Byrd & Michał Białek - 2021 - Cognition 104649.
    In response to crises, people sometimes prioritize fewer specific identifiable victims over many unspecified statistical victims. How other factors can explain this bias remains unclear. So two experiments investigated how complying with public health recommendations during the COVID19 pandemic depended on victim portrayal, reflection, and philosophical beliefs (Total N = 998). Only one experiment found that messaging about individual victims increased compliance compared to messaging about statistical victims—i.e., "flatten the curve" graphs—an effect that was undetected after controlling for other factors. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. An Argument for Compulsory Vaccination: The Taxation Analogy.Alberto Giubilini - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (3):446-466.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21. The Public Health Value of Opioid Litigation.Rebecca L. Haffajee - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (2):279-292.
    Opioid litigation continues a growing public health litigation trend in which governments seek to hold companies responsible for population harms related to their products. The litigation can serve to address gaps in regulatory and legislative policymaking and in market self-regulation pervasive in the prescription opioid domain. Moreover, prior opioid settlements have satisfied civil tort litigation objectives of obtaining compensation for injured parties, deterring harmful behavior, and holding certain opioid manufacturers, distributors and pharmacies accountable for their actions. In this way, opioid (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. The Coronavirus Pandemic: Public Health and American Values.Mark A. Rothstein - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (2):354-359.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Legal Crises in Public Health.James G. Hodge, Sarah A. Wetter & Erica N. White - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (4):778-782.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. Saving the Babies or the Elderly in a Time of Crisis?Joona Räsänen - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):180-182.
    Volume 20, Issue 7, July 2020, Page 180-182.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Mental Competence and Value: The Problem of Normativity in the Assessment of Decision-Making Capacity.Louis C. Charland - 2004 - In Françoise Baylis, Jocelyn Downie, Barry Hoffmaster & Susan Sherwin (eds.), Health Care Ethics in Canada. Toronto, ON, Canada: pp. 267-278.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. How Philosophy Bears on Covid-19.Thaddeus Metz - 2020 - South African Journal of Science 116 (7/8):1.
    A short reflection on respects in which philosophers are particularly, if not uniquely, well positioned to address certain ethical and epistemological controversies pertaining to the coronavirus.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. The Ethics of COVID-19 Immunity-Based Licenses (“Immunity Passports”).Govind Persad & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2020 - Journal of the American Medical Association:doi:10.1001/jama.2020.8102.
    Certifications of immunity are sometimes called “immunity passports” but are better conceptualized as immunity-based licenses. Such policies raise important questions about fairness, stigma, and counterproductive incentives but could also further individual freedom and improve public health. Immunity licenses should not be evaluated against a baseline of normalcy, ie, uninfected free movement. Rather, they should be compared to the alternatives of enforcing strict public health restrictions for many months or permitting activities that could spread infection, both of which exacerbate inequalities and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28. AI Methods in Bioethics.Joshua August Skorburg, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Vincent Conitzer - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics: Empirical Bioethics 1 (11):37-39.
    Commentary about the role of AI in bioethics for the 10th anniversary issue of AJOB: Empirical Bioethics.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. A Smack on the Chin or a Nibble? Content Analysis of the Impact of the Oakwood Trilogy.Tyler Gibb - 2010 - Michigan State University Journal of Medicine and Law 14:93-128.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Ethical and Professional Considerations in Integrated Behavioral Health.Tyler Gibb - forthcoming - Pediatric Clinics of North America.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Are You Ready to Meet Your Baby? Phenomenology, Pregnancy, and the Ultrasound.Casey Rentmeester - 2020 - Journal of Applied Hermeneutics 2 (2020):1-13.
    Iris Marion Young’s classic paper on the phenomenology of pregnancy chronicles the alienating tendencies of technology-ridden maternal care, as the mother’s subjective knowledge of the pregnancy gets overridden by the objective knowledge provided by medical personnel and technological apparatuses. Following Fredrik Svenaeus, the authors argue that maternal care is not necessarily alienating by looking specifically at the proper attention paid by sonographers in maternal care when performing ultrasound examinations. Using Martin Heidegger’s philosophy as a theoretical lens, the authors argue that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. The understanding of pain in bioethics thought.Carlos Alberto Rosas Jimenez - 2013 - Persona. Revista Iberoamericana de Personalismo Comunitario 1 (22):83-86.
    We can say that it is necessary for every human being to walk towards the comprehension of the contingent and limited reality of the human person, starting with those whose work involves dealing with patients, as well as those who dedicate themselves to bioethical reflection, and even the patients themselves. In this way, at the time when these people face a situation of pain and suffering, they will be able to assume it with integrity and strength, always choosing to protect (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Ethical Considerations for Health Care in Social Work in Jordan: What Could Bring Joy to Elderly Refugees in Times of Despair?Sahar Suleiman AlMakhamreh - 2019 - Ethics and Social Welfare 13 (4):409-423.
    Elderly refugees in Jordanian healthcare settings are a vulnerable group. Most of them come from a collectivist culture where family members are the main source of care. Many elderly refugees can no longer work as they did, and are in need of professional intervention from social workers who will take account of their cultural values and beliefs. This exploratory study seeks to understand the role that religion has in the lives of displaced elderly refugees and the impact of those perspectives (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Editors' Introduction.Zachary Hoskins, Joan Woolfrey & Gregory Hoskins - 2019 - Social Philosophy Today 35:1-5.
  35. Human Rights and Public Health Ethics.S. Matthew Liao - 2019 - Social Philosophy Today 35:9-20.
    This paper relates human rights to public health ethics and policies by discussing the nature and moral justification of human rights generally, and the right to health in particular. Which features of humanity ground human rights? To answer this question, as an alternative to agency and capabilities approaches, the paper offers the “fundamental conditions approach,” according to which human rights protect the fundamental conditions for pursuing a good life. The fundamental conditions approach identifies “basic health”—the adequate functioning of the various (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Why Read The Works Of Braine. [REVIEW]Michal Pruski - 2019 - Catholic Medical Quarterly 69:20.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Double Effect & Ectopic Pregnancy – Some Problems.Michal Pruski - 2019 - Catholic Medical Quarterly 69 (2):17-20.
    This paper looks at the Catholic justification of medical interventions in ectopic pregnancies. The paper first shows that the way how Double Effect Reasoning is often applied to ectopic pregnancies is not consistent with the way Aquinas introduces this mode of reasoning. The paper then shows certain problems in common defences of the use of salpingectomies. The paper then re-evaluates the medical interventions used in the management of ectopic pregnancies, with both a focus on the aim of the treatment and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38. The Epistemology of Medical Error in an Intersectional World.Devora Shapiro - 2019 - In Fritz Allhoff & Sandra L. Borden (eds.), Ethics and Error in Medicine.
    In this chapter I explicate and evaluate the concept of medical error. Unlike standard philosophical approaches to analyzing medical phenom- ena in the abstract, I instead address medical error specifi cally within the context of an embodied social world. I illustrate how, as a deeply contex- tual concept, medical error is inextricably tied to the social conditions— and concrete, powerful interests—of the particulars in which it is found. -/- I begin with an analysis that demonstrates the relational quality of medi- (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Moral Normative Force and Clinical Ethics Expertise.Parker Crutchfield - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (11):89-91.
    Brummett and Salter propose a useful and timely taxonomy of clinical ethics expertise (2019). As the field becomes further “professionalized” this taxonomy is important, and the core of it is right. It needs some refinement around the edges, however. In their conclusion, Brummett and Salter rightly point out that there is a significant difference between the ethicist whose recommendations are procedure- and process-heavy, consensus-driven, and dialogical and the authoritarian ethicist whose recommendations flow from “private moral views” (Brummett and Salter, 2019). (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. Questionable Benefits and Unavoidable Personal Beliefs: Defending Conscientious Objection for Abortion.Bruce Philip Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (46):178-182.
    Conscientious objection in healthcare has come under heavy criticism on two grounds recently, particularly regarding abortion provision. First, critics claim conscientious objection involves a refusal to provide a legal and beneficial procedure requested by a patient, denying them access to healthcare. Second, they argue the exercise of conscientious objection is based on unverifiable personal beliefs. These characteristics, it is claimed, disqualify conscientious objection in healthcare. Here, we defend conscientious objection in the context of abortion provision. We show that abortion has (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  41. Scandals in Health-Care: Their Impact on Health Policy and Nursing.Jacqueline S. Hutchison - 2016 - Nursing Inquiry 23 (1):32-41.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42. Using Animal-Derived Constituents in Anaesthesia and Surgery: The Case for Disclosing to Patients.Daniel Rodger & Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-9.
    Animal-derived constituents are frequently used in anaesthesia and surgery, and patients are seldom informed of this. This is problematic for a growing minority of patients who may have religious or secular concerns about their use in their care. It is not currently common practice to inform patients about the use of animal-derived constituents, yet what little empirical data does exist indicates that many patients want the opportunity to give their informed consent. First, we review the nature and scale of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Physician Ethics: How Billing Relates to Patient Care.Saba Fatima - 2019 - Journal of Hospital Ethics 5 (3):104-108.
    Medical billing has become so intertwined with patient care, that in order to be truly committed to the physician's telos of managing a patient's medical suffering, it is imperative that physician ought to reexamine many of the ethical considerations about billing.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Hospice Care as a Moral Practice: Exploring the Philosophy and Ethics of Hospice Care.Timothy W. Kirk - 2014 - In Timothy Kirk & Bruce Jennings (eds.), Hospice Ethics: Policy and Practice in Palliative Care. New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 35-56.
    This chapter explains the interrelationship between a clearly formulated philosophy of hospice care and the possibility of ethical reflection and analysis in hospice care. In so doing, it proposes that the reader consider the care given by hospices to be a special kind of practice that contains and infers its own ethics. Terminal care given by hospices is also situated in a larger society, and therefore its internal values interact with a broad set of social values; the practice of hospice (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Confidentiality.Timothy Kirk - 2015 - In Nathan Cherny, Marie Fallon, Kassa Stein, Russell Portenoy & David Currow (eds.), Oxford Textbook of Palliative Medicine (5th ed.). New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 279-284.
    This chapter offers an explanation of, and approach to, respecting confidentiality as an ethical obligation in the practice of hospice and palliative medicine. Understood in the context of coincident ethical obligations to maximize clinical benefit, avoid preventable harm, and restore moral agency, respecting confidentiality is embedded in the most basic philosophical precepts that define hospice and palliative care. How to respect confidentiality in everyday practice, however, can be a matter of unusual complexity. As such, following a brief conceptual framework, the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46. Communication Ethics.Timothy Kirk, Nessa Coyle & Matthew Doolittle - 2015 - In Elaine Wittenberg, Betty R. Ferrell, Joy Goldsmith, Thomas Smith, Myra Glajchen & George F. Handzo (eds.), Textbook of Palliative Care Communication. New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 27-34.
    Communication is a key mediating variable in achieving the primary goal of palliative care: optimizing quality of life by reducing suffering in patients and families experiencing serious and life-limiting illness. Through analysis of its conceptual foundation and internal values, this chapter demonstrates that palliative care is an inherently moral practice, seeking to ameliorate suffering by restoring and supporting the moral agency of patients and families. Because therapeutic communication is a necessary condition for achieving this goal, it constitutes a core ethical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Dying Tax Free: The Modern Advance Directive.Timothy Kirk & George R. Luck - 2010 - Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 3 (39):605-609.
    Advance directives are often used to help patients articulate their end-of-life treatment preferences and guide proxy decision makers in making health care decisions when patients cannot. This case study and commentary puts forth a situation in which a palliative care consultation team encountered a patient with an advance directive that instructed her proxy decision maker to consider estate tax implications when making end-of-life decisions. Following presentation of the case, the authors focus on two ethical issues: 1) the appropriateness of considering (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO) Position Statement and Commentary on the Use of Palliative Sedation in Imminently Dying Terminally Ill Patients.Timothy Kirk & Margaret M. Mahon - 2010 - Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 5 (39):914-923.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  49. Increasing Price and Reducing Access to Tobacco in New York City.Kevin R. J. Schroth - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (S2):87-90.
    This paper describes novel tobacco control laws passed in New York City in 2017. These laws are designed to improve the city's strategy of using price to decrease tobacco consumption, and over time, change the city's landscape by making tobacco less accessible.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Becoming a Hybrid Entity: A Policy Option for Public Health.Sallie Milam & Melissa Moorehead - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (S2):68-71.
    When Congress passed HIPAA, it did not intend to constrain public health's data sharing in the same way as clinical or payers. In fact, HIPAA recognizes data sharing with public health as a matter of national priority and shields this function from its reach. However, a health department may offer services that bring it within HIPAA's purview, such as running a Children's Health Insurance Program or a laboratory that bills electronically. When this is the case, HIPAA requires all information and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 6465