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  1. Mental Competence and Value: The Problem of Normativity in the Assessment of Decision-Making Capacity.Louis C. Charland - 2004 - In Françoise Baylis, Jocelyn Downie, Barry Hoffmaster & Susan Sherwin (eds.), Health Care Ethics in Canada. Toronto, ON, Canada: pp. 267-278.
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  2. The Convalescent's Diary. Art and its Possibilities in Psycho-Oncological Health.Srajana Kaikini - 2017 - In The Unquiet Mind. Cancer: The Meta ethical quandary of Therapies. New Delhi: pp. 92-98.
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  3. The Ethics of COVID-19 Immunity-Based Licenses (“Immunity Passports”).Govind Persad & Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 2020 - Journal of the American Medical Association:doi:10.1001/jama.2020.8102.
    Certifications of immunity are sometimes called “immunity passports” but are better conceptualized as immunity-based licenses. Such policies raise important questions about fairness, stigma, and counterproductive incentives but could also further individual freedom and improve public health. Immunity licenses should not be evaluated against a baseline of normalcy, ie, uninfected free movement. Rather, they should be compared to the alternatives of enforcing strict public health restrictions for many months or permitting activities that could spread infection, both of which exacerbate inequalities and (...)
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  4. AI Methods in Bioethics.Joshua August Skorburg, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Vincent Conitzer - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics: Empirical Bioethics 1 (11):37-39.
    Commentary about the role of AI in bioethics for the 10th anniversary issue of AJOB: Empirical Bioethics.
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  5. A Smack on the Chin or a Nibble? Content Analysis of the Impact of the Oakwood Trilogy.Tyler Gibb - 2010 - Michigan State University Journal of Medicine and Law 14:93-128.
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  6. Ethical and Professional Considerations in Integrated Behavioral Health.Tyler Gibb - forthcoming - Pediatric Clinics of North America.
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  7. Are You Ready to Meet Your Baby? Phenomenology, Pregnancy, and the Ultrasound.Casey Rentmeester - 2020 - Journal of Applied Hermeneutics 2 (2020):1-13.
    Iris Marion Young’s classic paper on the phenomenology of pregnancy chronicles the alienating tendencies of technology-ridden maternal care, as the mother’s subjective knowledge of the pregnancy gets overridden by the objective knowledge provided by medical personnel and technological apparatuses. Following Fredrik Svenaeus, the authors argue that maternal care is not necessarily alienating by looking specifically at the proper attention paid by sonographers in maternal care when performing ultrasound examinations. Using Martin Heidegger’s philosophy as a theoretical lens, the authors argue that (...)
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  8. The understanding of pain in bioethics thought.Carlos Alberto Rosas Jimenez - 2013 - Persona. Revista Iberoamericana de Personalismo Comunitario 1 (22):83-86.
    We can say that it is necessary for every human being to walk towards the comprehension of the contingent and limited reality of the human person, starting with those whose work involves dealing with patients, as well as those who dedicate themselves to bioethical reflection, and even the patients themselves. In this way, at the time when these people face a situation of pain and suffering, they will be able to assume it with integrity and strength, always choosing to protect (...)
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  9. Editors' Introduction.Zachary Hoskins, Joan Woolfrey & Gregory Hoskins - 2019 - Social Philosophy Today 35:1-5.
  10. Human Rights and Public Health Ethics.S. Matthew Liao - 2019 - Social Philosophy Today 35:9-20.
    This paper relates human rights to public health ethics and policies by discussing the nature and moral justification of human rights generally, and the right to health in particular. Which features of humanity ground human rights? To answer this question, as an alternative to agency and capabilities approaches, the paper offers the “fundamental conditions approach,” according to which human rights protect the fundamental conditions for pursuing a good life. The fundamental conditions approach identifies “basic health”—the adequate functioning of the various (...)
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  11. Why Read The Works Of Braine. [REVIEW]Michal Pruski - 2019 - Catholic Medical Quarterly 69:20.
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  12. Double Effect & Ectopic Pregnancy – Some Problems.Michal Pruski - 2019 - Catholic Medical Quarterly 69 (2):17-20.
    This paper looks at the Catholic justification of medical interventions in ectopic pregnancies. The paper first shows that the way how Double Effect Reasoning is often applied to ectopic pregnancies is not consistent with the way Aquinas introduces this mode of reasoning. The paper then shows certain problems in common defences of the use of salpingectomies. The paper then re-evaluates the medical interventions used in the management of ectopic pregnancies, with both a focus on the aim of the treatment and (...)
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  13. The Epistemology of Medical Error in an Intersectional World.Devora Shapiro - 2019 - In Fritz Allhoff & Sandra L. Borden (eds.), Ethics and Error in Medicine.
    In this chapter I explicate and evaluate the concept of medical error. Unlike standard philosophical approaches to analyzing medical phenom- ena in the abstract, I instead address medical error specifi cally within the context of an embodied social world. I illustrate how, as a deeply contex- tual concept, medical error is inextricably tied to the social conditions— and concrete, powerful interests—of the particulars in which it is found. -/- I begin with an analysis that demonstrates the relational quality of medi- (...)
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  14. Rural Bioethics: The Alaska Context.Fritz Allhoff & Luke Golemon - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-19.
    With by far the lowest population density in the United States, myriad challenges attach to healthcare delivery in Alaska. In the “Size, Population, and Accessibility” section, we characterize this geographic context, including how it is exacerbated by lack of infrastructure. In the “Distributing Healthcare” section, we turn to healthcare economics and staffing, showing how these bear on delivery—and are exacerbated by geography. In the “Health Care in Rural Alaska” section, we turn to rural care, exploring in more depth what healthcare (...)
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  15. Medical Overtesting and Racial Distrust.Luke Golemon - 2019 - In Fritz Allhoff & Sandra Borden (eds.), Ethics and Error in Medicine. New York, NY, USA: pp. 121-147.
    Reprinted with modification and permission from Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal. -/- The phenomenon of medical overtesting in general, and specifically in the emergency room, is well-known and regarded as harmful to both the patient and the healthcare system. Although the implications of this problem raise myriad ethical concerns, this chapter explores the extent to which overtesting might mitigate race-based health inequalities. Given that medical malpractice and error greatly increase when the patients belong to a racial minority, it is no (...)
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  16. Medical Overtesting and Racial Distrust.Luke Golemon - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29 (3):273-303.
    The phenomenon of medical overtesting in general, and specifically in the emergency room, is well-known and regarded as harmful to both the patient and the healthcare system. Although the implications of this problem raise myriad ethical concerns, this paper explores the extent to which overtesting might mitigate race-based health inequalities. Given that medical malpractice and error greatly increase when the patients belong to a racial minority, it is no surprise that the mortality rate similarly increases in proportion to white patients. (...)
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  17. Moral Normative Force and Clinical Ethics Expertise.Parker Crutchfield - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (11):89-91.
    Brummett and Salter propose a useful and timely taxonomy of clinical ethics expertise (2019). As the field becomes further “professionalized” this taxonomy is important, and the core of it is right. It needs some refinement around the edges, however. In their conclusion, Brummett and Salter rightly point out that there is a significant difference between the ethicist whose recommendations are procedure- and process-heavy, consensus-driven, and dialogical and the authoritarian ethicist whose recommendations flow from “private moral views” (Brummett and Salter, 2019). (...)
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  18. Questionable Benefits and Unavoidable Personal Beliefs: Defending Conscientious Objection for Abortion.Bruce Philip Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (46):178-182.
    Conscientious objection in healthcare has come under heavy criticism on two grounds recently, particularly regarding abortion provision. First, critics claim conscientious objection involves a refusal to provide a legal and beneficial procedure requested by a patient, denying them access to healthcare. Second, they argue the exercise of conscientious objection is based on unverifiable personal beliefs. These characteristics, it is claimed, disqualify conscientious objection in healthcare. Here, we defend conscientious objection in the context of abortion provision. We show that abortion has (...)
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  19. Scandals in Health-Care: Their Impact on Health Policy and Nursing.Jacqueline S. Hutchison - 2016 - Nursing Inquiry 23 (1):32-41.
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  20. Using Animal-Derived Constituents in Anaesthesia and Surgery: The Case for Disclosing to Patients.Daniel Rodger & Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-9.
    Animal-derived constituents are frequently used in anaesthesia and surgery, and patients are seldom informed of this. This is problematic for a growing minority of patients who may have religious or secular concerns about their use in their care. It is not currently common practice to inform patients about the use of animal-derived constituents, yet what little empirical data does exist indicates that many patients want the opportunity to give their informed consent. First, we review the nature and scale of the (...)
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  21. Physician Ethics: How Billing Relates to Patient Care.Saba Fatima - 2019 - Journal of Hospital Ethics 5 (3):104-108.
    Medical billing has become so intertwined with patient care, that in order to be truly committed to the physician's telos of managing a patient's medical suffering, it is imperative that physician ought to reexamine many of the ethical considerations about billing.
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  22. Hospice as a Moral Practice: Exploring the Philosophy and Ethics of Hospice Care.Timothy Kirk - 2014 - In Timothy W. Kirk & Bruce Jennings (eds.), Hospice Ethics: Policy and Practice in Palliative Care. New York, NY, USA: pp. 35-56.
    This chapter explains the interrelationship between a clearly formulated philosophy of hospice care and the possibility of ethical reflection and analysis in hospice care. In so doing, it proposes that the reader consider the care given by hospices to be a special kind of practice that contains and infers its own ethics. Terminal care given by hospices is also situated in a larger society, and therefore its internal values interact with a broad set of social values; the practice of hospice (...)
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  23. Confidentiality.Timothy Kirk - 2015 - In Nathan Cherny, Marie Fallon, Kassa Stein, Russell Portenoy & David Currow (eds.), Oxford Textbook of Palliative Medicine (5th ed.). New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 279-284.
    This chapter offers an explanation of, and approach to, respecting confidentiality as an ethical obligation in the practice of hospice and palliative medicine. Understood in the context of coincident ethical obligations to maximize clinical benefit, avoid preventable harm, and restore moral agency, respecting confidentiality is embedded in the most basic philosophical precepts that define hospice and palliative care. How to respect confidentiality in everyday practice, however, can be a matter of unusual complexity. As such, following a brief conceptual framework, the (...)
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  24. Communication Ethics.Timothy Kirk, Nessa Coyle & Matthew Doolittle - 2015 - In Elaine Wittenberg, Betty R. Ferrell, Joy Goldsmith, Thomas Smith, Myra Glajchen & George F. Handzo (eds.), Textbook of Palliative Care Communication. New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 27-34.
    Communication is a key mediating variable in achieving the primary goal of palliative care: optimizing quality of life by reducing suffering in patients and families experiencing serious and life-limiting illness. Through analysis of its conceptual foundation and internal values, this chapter demonstrates that palliative care is an inherently moral practice, seeking to ameliorate suffering by restoring and supporting the moral agency of patients and families. Because therapeutic communication is a necessary condition for achieving this goal, it constitutes a core ethical (...)
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  25. Dying Tax Free: The Modern Advance Directive.Timothy Kirk & George R. Luck - 2010 - Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 3 (39):605-609.
    Advance directives are often used to help patients articulate their end-of-life treatment preferences and guide proxy decision makers in making health care decisions when patients cannot. This case study and commentary puts forth a situation in which a palliative care consultation team encountered a patient with an advance directive that instructed her proxy decision maker to consider estate tax implications when making end-of-life decisions. Following presentation of the case, the authors focus on two ethical issues: 1) the appropriateness of considering (...)
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  26. National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO) Position Statement and Commentary on the Use of Palliative Sedation in Imminently Dying Terminally Ill Patients.Timothy Kirk & Margaret M. Mahon - 2010 - Journal of Pain and Symptom Management 5 (39):914-923.
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  27. Public Mental Health Ethics: An Overview.Kelso Cratsley & Jennifer Radden - 2019 - In Kelso Cratsley & Jennifer Radden (eds.), Mental Health as Public Health: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Ethics of Prevention.
    In this chapter we outline ethical issues raised by the application of public health approaches to the field of mental health. We first set out some of the basics of public health ethics that are particularly relevant to mental health, with special attention to the ongoing debate over the traditional presumption of non-infringement, increased recognition of the social determinants of health, and the concept of prevention. Then we turn to the moral particularities of mental health, focusing on questions concerning coercion (...)
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  28. Introduction.Jennifer Radden & Kelso Cratsley - 2019 - In Kelso Cratsley & Jennifer Radden (eds.), Mental Health as Public Health: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Ethics of Prevention.
    In this introduction to the edited volume we briefly describe some of the current challenges faced by public mental health initiatives, at both the national and global level. We also include several general remarks on interdisciplinary methodology in public mental health ethics, followed by short descriptions of the chapters included in the volume.
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  29. Mental Health as Public Health: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Ethics of Prevention.Kelso Cratsley & Jennifer Radden - 2019 - Elsevier.
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  30. An Introduction to Ethical Theory for Healthcare Assistants.Daniel Rodger & Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2017 - British Journal of Healthcare Assistants 11 (11):556-561.
    This article will explore and summarise the four main ethical theories that have relevance for healthcare assistants. These are utilitarianism, deontology, virtue ethics, and principlism. Understanding different ethical theories can have a number of significant benefits, which have the potential to shape and inform the care of patients, challenge bad practice and lead staff to become better informed about areas of moral disagreement.
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  31. "Common Arguments About Abortion" and "Better (Philosophical) Arguments About Abortion".Nathan Nobis & Kristina Grob - 2019 - Introduction to Ethics: An Open Educational Resource.
    Two chapters -- "Common Arguments about Abortion" and "Better (Philosophical) Arguments About Abortion" -- in one file, from the open access textbook "Introduction to Ethics: An Open Educational Resource" edited by Noah Levin. -/- Adults, children and babies are arguably wrong to kill, fundamentally, because we are conscious, aware and have feelings. Since early fetuses entirely lack these characteristics, we argue that they are not inherently wrong to kill and so most abortions are not morally wrong, since most abortions are (...)
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  32. The Intouchables: Written and Directed by Olivier Nakache and Eric Toledano, 2011, Quad Productions. [REVIEW]Katrina A. Bramstedt - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (4):523-524.
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  33. Health and Disease in Tribal Societies. Ciba Foundation Symposium 49.T. W. Meade - 1978 - Journal of Biosocial Science 10 (3):304-305.
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  34. Severity as a Priority Setting Criterion: Setting a Challenging Research Agenda.Mathias Barra, Mari Broqvist, Erik Gustavsson, Martin Henriksson, Niklas Juth, Lars Sandman & Carl Tollef Solberg - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 1:1-20.
    Priority setting in health care is ubiquitous and health authorities are increasingly recognising the need for priority setting guidelines to ensure efficient, fair, and equitable resource allocation. While cost-effectiveness concerns seem to dominate many policies, the tension between utilitarian and deontological concerns is salient to many, and various severity criteria appear to fill this gap. Severity, then, must be subjected to rigorous ethical and philosophical analysis. Here we first give a brief history of the path to today’s severity criteria in (...)
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  35. Metrics of Patient, Public, Consumer, and Community Engagement in Healthcare Systems: How Should We Define Engagement, What Are We Measuring, and Does It Matter for Patient Care? Comment on "Metrics and Evaluation Tools for Patient Engagement in Healthcare Organization- and System-Level Decision-Making: A Systematic Review". [REVIEW]Zackary Berger - 2018 - International Journal of Health Policy and Management 8:49-50.
    In a rigorous systematic review, Dukhanin and colleagues categorize metrics and evaluative tools of the engagement of patient, public, consumer, and community in decision-making in healthcare institutions and systems. The review itself is ably done and the categorizations lead to a useful understanding of the necessary elements of engagement, and a suite of measures relevant to implementing engagement in systems. Nevertheless, the question remains whether the engagement of patient representatives in institutional or systemic deliberations will lead to improved clinical outcomes (...)
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  36. Comment on 'Patients' Rights: Ethical Questions' by Kate Millett.Marilyn Frye - manuscript
    Comment on "Patients' Rights: Ethical Questions" by Kate Millett, at The Michigan Psychoanalytic Council, February 15, 1992, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
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  37. Health Care Ethics in Canada. Jocelyn Baylis, Françoise Downie, Benjamin Freedman, Barry Hoffmaster, and Susan Sherwin Toronto: Harcourt Brace, 1995. Xiv + 576 Pp., $39.95. [REVIEW]R. W. Krutzen - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (3):590-591.
    Health Care Ethics is another addition to the growing number of texts that attempt to provide a much-needed Canadian perspective on many of the issues that arise in the delivery of health care. The readings are divided into three parts: “The Nature and Context of Health Care Ethics”; “Decision-Making in Health Care”; and “Decisions Near the Beginning and End of Life.” Collectively, they cover a variety of different issues—pluralism and multiculturalism, resource allocation and rationing, consent, research involving human subjects, genetics, (...)
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  38. Decisions Regarding Hospice Care for Isolated Patients.Timothy W. Kirk & Randi Erin Seigel - 2016 - NYSBA Health Law Journal 21 (3):56-60.
    The Family Health Care Decisions Act (FHCDA) was adopted by New York State in September 2010, after first being introduced in the Assembly 18 years prior. The FHCDA establishes the authority of a patient’s family member or close friend (referred to as a “Surrogate”) to make health care decisions when the patient lacks decision-making capacity, has not executed a proxy appointing a health care agent, and does not have a guardian. A Surrogate is authorized to make health care decisions, including (...)
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  39. Book Review: Oxymorons: The Myth of a U.S. Health Care System.Bradford Kirkman-Liff - 2002 - Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing 39 (4):429-430.
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  40. Book Review: Oxymorons: The Myth of a U.S. Health Care System.Bradford Kirkman-Liff - 2002 - Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing 39 (4):429-430.
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  41. Medical Ethics and Law, 2nd Edition: The Core Curriculum.Dominic Wilkinson, Julian Savulescu, Tony Hope & Judith Hendrick - 2008 - Philadelphia, USA: Elsevier.
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  42. Book Review: What Price Mental Health?: What Price Mental Health?: The Ethics and Politics of Priority Setting. [REVIEW]Kimberly Strom-Gottfried - 1996 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (3):267-269.
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  43. Book Review: Pain in the Elderly. [REVIEW]Judith C. Ahronheim - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (4):307-309.
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  44. Ethical Elder Care for Families: Moments That Matter: Cases in Ethical Elder Care. Michael Gordon. New York, NY: iUniverse Inc., 2010, 182 Pages, $16.95. [REVIEW]Michelle Gagnon & Thomas Hadjistavropoulos - 2011 - Ethics and Behavior 21 (3):260-261.
    Ethics & Behavior, Volume 21, Issue 3, Page 260-261, May-June 2011.
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  45. Personal, Practical, and Professional Issues in Providing Managed Mental Health Care: A Discussion for New Psychotherapists.James R. Alleman - 2001 - Ethics and Behavior 11 (4):413-429.
    Written by a former corporate manager pursuing counseling as a 2nd career, this article offers pointed views on managed mental health care. Values of practitioners that are a mismatch for managed care are noted, and more specific disadvantages and advantages are examined. Loss of client confidentiality is addressed and procedures and technologies for its reclamation are noted. Negative effects on therapy are acknowledged and potential for better accountability and research are pointed out. Economic disadvantages of a small provider's practice as (...)
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  46. Review of Bernard Lown, M.D. And Howard Zinn, Ph.D., Prescription for Survival: A Doctor's Journey to End Nuclear Madness 1. [REVIEW]Lou-Anne Beauregard - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (10):62-63.
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  47. Applied Ethics in Mental Health in Cuba: Part I-Guiding Concepts and Values.Amy Rossiter, Richard Walsh-Bowers, Isaac Prilleltensky & Laura Sánchez Valdés - 2002 - Ethics and Behavior 12 (3):223-242.
    As part of a project on professionals' lived experience of ethics, this article explores the guiding concepts and values concerning ethics of mental health professionals in Cuba. The data, obtained through individual interviews and focus groups with 28 professionals, indicate that Cubans conceptualize applied ethics in terms of its central role in professional practice and its connection to the social context and subjective processes. Findings also show that Cuban professionals are guided not only by a set of professional values but (...)
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  48. Active Shooters in Health Care Settings: Prevention and Response Through Law and Policy: Public Health and the Law.James G. Hodge & Kellie Nelson - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (2):268-271.
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  49. Living Well with Dementia Together: Affiliation as a Fertile Functioning.Annie Austin - 2018 - Public Health Ethics 11 (2):139-150.
    Justice requires that public policy improve the lives of disadvantaged members of society. Dementia is a source of disadvantage, and a growing global public health challenge. This article examines the theoretical and ethical connections between theories of justice and public dementia policy. Disability in general, and dementia in particular, poses important challenges for theories of justice, especially social contract theories. First, the article argues that non-contractarian accounts of justice such as the Capabilities and Disadvantage approaches are better equipped than their (...)
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  50. Ethics in Public Health and Population Health.Marvin J. H. Lee - 2018 - In Sally Kuykendall (ed.), Encyclopedia of Public Health Principles, People, and Programs. Santa Barbara, CA, USA:
    Ethics in Public Health and Population Health.
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