Abstract
This paper examines expressed hopelessness among environmental activists in Extinction Rebellion. While activists claim that they have lost all hope for a future without global warming and species extinction, through despair emerges a new hope for saving what can still be saved—a hope for what is left. This radical hope, emerging from despair, may make Extinction Rebellion even more effective. Drawing from personal interviews with 25 Extinction Rebellion activists in the United Kingdom and the published work of other Extinction Rebellion activists, this paper identifies signs of radical hope. While activists have cast off false hope and passive hope, a new hope for what is still possible remains. This hope is based on virtue ethics: doing what is right in the moment, rather than being attached to a desired outcome. This drives forward activism despite the results. Through their principle of regenerative culture, Extinction Rebellion activists learn to support each other and be prepared for a more turbulent and challenging future. Through a regenerative culture they can salvage and repair what is left and sustain radical hope.
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DOI 10.1007/s10806-020-09835-y
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References found in this work BETA

After Virtue: A Study in Moral Theory.Alasdair C. MacIntyre - 1983 - University of Notre Dame Press.
The Principle of Hope.Ernst Bloch - 1988 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 23 (3):177-180.
Radical Hope for Living Well in a Warmer World.Allen Thompson - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1-2):43-55.
Hope in Environmental Philosophy.Lisa Kretz - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):925-944.
Environmentalism and Public Virtue.Brian Treanor - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (1-2):9-28.

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