Aristotle and Kant on self-disclosure in friendship

Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (2):225-239 (2004)
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Abstract

Both Aristotle and Kant note that the highest form of friendship enables individuals of good virtue to reveal themselves to one another. I argue that Aristotle and Kant emphasize complementary aspects of self-disclosure in friendship: whereas Kant acknowledges the inherent value of self-disclosure in friendship, Aristotle suggests that joint perception in friendship is instrumentally valuable in the acquisition of self-knowledge. I also argue that although Aristotle has a more developed account of friendship, Kant advances a superior account of self-disclosure in friendship in his later remarks on friendship in the Metaphysical Principles of Virtue

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Andrea Veltman
James Madison University

References found in this work

Duty and Desolation.Rae Langton - 1992 - Philosophy 67 (262):481 - 505.
“Moral Friendship” in Kant.Silvestro Marcucci - 1999 - Kant Studien 90 (4):434-441.

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