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  1.  6
    L. Varius Rufus, De Morte (Frs. 1–4 Morel).A. S. Hollis - 1977 - Classical Quarterly 27 (01):187-.
    Already an admired senior poet to Virgil in the Eclogues , Varius by the mid-thirties, B.C. had established himself as the leading epic writer of his day . It is a sobering thought that we do not know even the titles of the serious hexameter works which had won him so high a reputation, except for de Morte, quoted four times by Macrobius.
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  2.  14
    Some Allusions to Earlier Hellenistic Poetry in Nonnus.A. S. Hollis - 1976 - Classical Quarterly 26 (01):142-.
    Nonnus, as well as being soaked in Homer and, no doubt, earlier epics on his particular theme , had a great affection for the Hellenistic master—above all Callimachus, Apollonius, Theocritus, and Euphorion. For this reason he can provide valuable help towards the study of fragments and new papyri. Pfeiffer, in his edition of the Callimachus fragments, is of course fully alive to this point, and regularly quotes Nonnus. From the other side there is a useful collection of parallels in Keydell's (...)
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  3.  14
    The Composition of Callimachus' Aetia in the Light of P. Oxy. 2258.A. S. Hollis - 1986 - Classical Quarterly 36 (02):467-.
    Rudolf Pfeiffer believed that, as a young man, Callimachus wrote four books of Aetia. To these the poet added in his old age a Reply to his Critics , and a slightly revised version of his recent occasional elegy, the Lock of Berenice ; this revised Coma became the last poem in Aetia book 4, to be followed by an Epilogue which may mark a transition to the Iambi. Pfeiffer's theory generally held the field until the brilliant article of P. (...)
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  4.  13
    Πολυκαμπεα Μετρα Χορειηс. [REVIEW]A. S. Hollis - 1994 - The Chesterton Review 44 (1):14-15.
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  5.  21
    ΠΟΛΥΚΑΜΠΕΑ ΜΕΤΡΑ ΧΟΡΕΙΗС - Joelle Gerbeau† : Nonnos de Panopolis, Les Dionysiaques, Tome VII: Chants XVIII-XIX. Texte établi et traduit. Pp. xiii + 191 . Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1992. [REVIEW]A. S. Hollis - 1994 - The Classical Review 44 (01):14-15.
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  6.  33
    A. A. R. Henderson: P. Ovidi Nasonis Remedia Amoris. Pp. Xxv+147. Edinburgh: Scottish Academic Press, 1979. Paper, £4.50. [REVIEW]A. S. Hollis - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (01):131-.
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  7.  13
    A. A. R. Henderson: P. Ovidi Nasonis Remedia Amoris. Pp. Xxv+147. Edinburgh: Scottish Academic Press, 1979. Paper, £4.50. [REVIEW]A. S. Hollis - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (1):131-131.
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  8.  21
    Aemilius Macer, Alexipharmaca?A. S. Hollis - 1973 - The Classical Review 23 (01):11-.
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  9.  12
    A New Fragment on Niobe and the Text of Propertius 2.20.8.A. S. Hollis - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (2):578-582.
    Michael Choniates , a pupil of Eustathius of Thessalonica, who was Greek Orthodox Metropolitan of Athens for some 25 years up to that city's capture by Frankish crusaders in a.d. 1205, is best known to classical scholars as the possessor of probably the last complete copy of Callimachus' Hecale and Aetia. He had brought with him from Constantinople many books of all kinds, and added to his collection when in Athens. Although an immense task, it would be well worth trying (...)
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  10.  11
    Callimachus, Aetia Fr. 1.9–12.A. S. Hollis - 1978 - Classical Quarterly 28 (02):402-.
    Both and are guaranteed by the London scholia , so the gap is reduced to the tantalizingly small one of a monosyllabic feminine noun in the accusative case, most probably of four letters. The number of possibilities cannot be unlimited. My own suggestion must necessarily remain in limbo in the present state of our knowledge concerning the poet or poets whom Callimachus is talking about, but at least it seems to me less bizarre than other restorations currently in the field.
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  11.  34
    Kathryn Gutzwiller: Studies in the Hellenistic Epyllion. (Beiträge Zur Klassischen Philologie, 114.) Pp. 95. Königstein/Taunus: Anton Hain, 1981. Paper, DM. 47. [REVIEW]A. S. Hollis - 1983 - The Classical Review 33 (01):130-.
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  12.  4
    Kathryn Gutzwiller: Studies in the Hellenistic Epyllion. Pp. 95. Königstein/Taunus: Anton Hain, 1981. Paper, DM. 47.A. S. Hollis - 1983 - The Classical Review 33 (1):130-130.
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  13.  4
    Notes on Callimachus, Hecale.A. S. Hollis - 1982 - Classical Quarterly 32 (02):469-.
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  14.  24
    Ovid, A.A. I. 197–8: The Wrong Phraates?A. S. Hollis - 1970 - The Classical Review 20 (02):141-142.
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  15.  13
    Ovidius Exulans. [REVIEW]A. S. Hollis - 1996 - The Classical Review 46 (1):26-27.
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  16.  12
    Octavian in the Fourth Georgic.A. S. Hollis - 1996 - Classical Quarterly 46 (01):305-.
    Some scholars have seen in ‘fulminat’ an allusion to Callimachus' βροντν οκ μν, λλ Διc , and that is reasonable enough, since Virgil contrasts the warlike fulminations of Octavian with mocking disparagement of his own very different lifestyle . But it may have escaped attention that Virgil seems to be imitating some lines by another Hellenistic poet, Rhianus ; the parallel has thought-provoking implications.
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  17.  23
    Rights of Way in Ovid ( Heroides 20.146) and Plautus ( Curculio 36).A. S. Hollis - 1994 - Classical Quarterly 44 (02):545-.
    Acontius rhetorically addresses the young man to whom Cydippe's parents have betrothed her, whom he imagines as showing excessive familiarity while visiting the girl's sickbed. In line 146, ‘spes’ may be considered the vulgate reading; the noun can be used concretely, of the object of one's hopes , a person in whom hopes are centred , or sometimes as an endearment . For application to a girl with suitors, cf. Ovid, Met. 4.795 ‘multorumque fuit spes invidiosa procorum’. Or one could (...)
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  18.  29
    Repli Vers Ľest Pierre Chuvin: Mythologie et gèographie dionysiaques. Recherches sur LΆeuvre de Nonnos de Panopolis. ('Vates', Collection publiée sous le patronage du Centre de recherches de poésie latine et grecque de ľ;Université de Clermont, 2.) Pp. 366; 4 maps, 4 plates, Clermont-Ferrand: Éditions Adosa, 1991. Paper, frs 330. [REVIEW]A. S. Hollis - 1994 - The Classical Review 44 (01):12-13.
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  19.  26
    Repli Vers Ľest. [REVIEW]A. S. Hollis - 1994 - The Chesterton Review 44 (1):12-13.
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  20.  20
    Some Fragments of Callimachus' Hecale.A. S. Hollis - 1965 - The Classical Review 15 (03):259-260.
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  21.  27
    Two Adynata in Horace, Epode 16.A. S. Hollis - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (01):311-.
    Horace had good reason to know these lines since they come from the foundation oracle of one of his favourite places, Tarentum, delivered to the founder Phalanthus whom Horace mentions in Odes 2.6.11–12, ‘regnata petam Laconi | rura Phalantho’. It is a regular feature of such oracles that, however absurd and impossible they may seem, they will be fulfilled in a quite unexpected way.
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  22.  14
    The New Gallus, 8–9.A. S. Hollis - 1980 - Classical Quarterly 30 (02):541-.
    As far as I am aware, it has generally been taken for granted that ‘Kato’ in the pentameter must be vocative. The double vocative ‘Visce’—‘Kato’ does not seem objectionable if ‘non’ were repeated as first word of the pentameter . None the less this is unexpected, and it seems at least worth considering the possibility that 'Kato’ might be nominative. The most plausible way of accounting for a nominative would be as subject of a relative clause. Further consequences would follow (...)
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  23.  17
    Two Notes on Callimachus.A. S. Hollis - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (01):5-.
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