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  1.  6
    Networked names: synonyms in eighteenth-century botany.Bettina Dietz - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):1-20.
    This paper addresses early modern botanical nomenclature, the practices of identifying and publishing synonyms in particular, as a collaborative “information science”. Before Linnaean nomenclature became the lingua franca of botany, it was inevitable that, over time, the same plant was given several names by different people, which created confusion and made communication among botanists increasingly difficult. What names counted as synonyms and actually referred to the same plant had to be identified by meticulously comparing living and dried specimens of this (...)
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  2.  34
    Contribution and Co-Production: The Collaborative Culture of Linnaean Botany.Bettina Dietz - 2012 - Annals of Science 69 (4):551-569.
    Summary This essay aims to elucidate the collaborative dimension of the knowledge-making process in eighteenth-century Linnaean botany. Due to its ever increasing and potentially infinite need for information, Linnaean botany had to rely more and more heavily on the accumulation and aggregation of contributions by many people. This, in turn, had a crucial impact on the genesis and form of botanical publications: the more comprehensive the project, the larger the effect. It was the botanist Carl Linnaeus who managed to establish (...)
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    Networked names: synonyms in eighteenth-century botany.Bettina Dietz - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):1-20.
    This paper addresses early modern botanical nomenclature, the practices of identifying and publishing synonyms in particular, as a collaborative “information science”. Before Linnaean nomenclature became the lingua franca of botany, it was inevitable that, over time, the same plant was given several names by different people, which created confusion and made communication among botanists increasingly difficult. What names counted as synonyms and actually referred to the same plant had to be identified by meticulously comparing living and dried specimens of this (...)
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  4. Iterative Books: Posthumous Publishing in Eighteenth-Century Botany.Bettina Dietz - forthcoming - History of Science:007327532097083.
    The growing number of known plants, and the need repeatedly to correct their names and their taxonomic attributions, demanded strategies for combining the static nature of a printed book with the fluctuating nature of the information it contained. From the second half of the seventeenth century botanists increasingly relied on publishing multiple updated editions of a book instead of attempting to correct, polish, and thus delay the appearance of a manuscript until, in the author’s opinion, it was finished. Provisional by (...)
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    Knowledge in Translation: Global Patterns of Scientific Exchange, 1000–1800 CE: Edited by P. Manning and A. Owen, Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Press, 2018, 437 Pp., 44 Plts, $55.00, ISBN 9780822945376.Bettina Dietz - 2020 - Annals of Science 77 (3):388-389.
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    Linnaeus' Restless System: Translation as Textual Engineering in Eighteenth-Century Botany.Bettina Dietz - 2016 - Annals of Science 73 (2):143-156.
    SUMMARYIn this essay, translations of Linnaeus' Systema naturae into various European languages will be placed into the context of successively expanded editions of Linnaeus' writings. The ambition and intention of most translators was not only to make the Systema naturae accessible for practical botanical use by a wider readership, but also to supplement and correct it, and thus to shape it. By recruiting more users, translations made a significant contribution to keeping the Systema up to date and thus maintaining its (...)
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