34 found
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  1.  1
    Greek Metre.C. W. Willink & M. L. West - 1984 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 104:226.
  2.  7
    Prodikos, 'Meteorosophists' and the 'Tantalos' Paradigm.C. W. Willink - 1983 - Classical Quarterly 33 (01):25-.
    Three famous sophists are referred to together in the Apology of Sokrates as still practising their enviably lucrative itinerant profession in 399 b.c. : Gorgias of Leontinoi, Prodikos of Keos and Hippias of Elis. The last of these was the least well known to the Athenian demos, having practised mainly in I Dorian cities. There is no extant reference to him in Old Comedy, but we can assume that he was sufficiently famous – especially for his fees – to justify (...)
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  3.  3
    Lexicographica Graeca. Contributions to the Iexicography of Ancient Greek.C. W. Willink & J. Chadwick - 1999 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 119:175.
  4.  11
    The Manuscript Tradition of Orestes. [REVIEW]C. W. Willink - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (2):265-266.
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  5.  12
    The Manuscript Tradition of Orestes James Diggle: The Textual Tradition of Euripides' Orestes. Xii+184. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991. £35. [REVIEW]C. W. Willink - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (02):265-266.
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  6.  4
    The Prologue of Iphigenia at Aulis.C. W. Willink - 1971 - Classical Quarterly 21 (02):343-.
    Iphigenia at aulis presents many problems to the literary and textual critic. Among these the problem of the prologue is as clear-cut as it is controversial. It may be summarized as follows: Our text opens abruptly with an anapaestic dialogue between Agamemnon and the Retainer , instead of the usual monologue in trimeters. In reply to a question from the Retainer, Agamemnon launches into a long iambic narrative , describing much that the Retainer must know already, and with no sign, (...)
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  7.  11
    Further Critical Notes on Euripides' Hippolytus.C. W. Willink - 1999 - Classical Quarterly 49 (02):408-.
    29–33. Phaedra's ἒρως must at first have been without betraying symptoms, by contrast with the change at Trozen to symptoms of νόσος as described in 34–40. We need to be told that explicitly, in preparation for 34ff. and in conjunction with the potentially revealing foundation of a temple to Aphrodite. We therefore need not only Jortin's ὀνομάσουσιν for ὠνόμαζєν in 33, but also my δηλον for ἒκδηλον in 32. The nearby ἒκδηλον in 37 will have played a part in the (...)
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  8.  10
    The Parodos of Euripides' Helen (164–90).C. W. Willink - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (01):77-.
    The friendly expatriate ladies of the chorus in Helen enter having heard loud lamentation issuing from the palace, while engaged, like the Φλα of the chorus in Hippolytus 125ff., in spreading laundered crimson textiles to dry in the sun. The central theme of ‘hearing cries’, with the verb κλυον and nouns of utterance , is reminiscent also of Medea 131ff., where the opening words of the Parodos κλυον Φωνν, κλυον δ βον… allude to Medea's loud utterances сωθεν in 96ff. and (...)
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  9.  5
    Sophocles, Electra 137–91.C. W. Willink - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (01):299-.
    The familiar crux in line 139, as obelized by Dawe, disappears in the new Oxford Text, whose editors accept the Triclinian reading . Their short critical note touches only on the metrical issue, citing discussions by Stinton and Diggle, in both of which acceptance of here is cautiously linked with recognition of the same responsion at Philoctetes 209/218 and Euripides, Medea 159/183. The note concludes with a reference to p. 75 of an article by K. Itsumi.
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  10.  8
    The Reunion Duo In Euripides' Helen.C. W. Willink - 1989 - Classical Quarterly 39 (01):45-.
    So begins one of the most engaging, and variously controversial, musical scenes in Euripides. The Messenger's narrative of the Phantom Helen's disappearance has proved to Menelaus that the Helen standing before him is the real Helen, altogether innocent of elopement to Troy, from whom he has been sundered for seventeen laborious years. The ensuing embrace is developed in a duet which is followed without a break by the so-called ‘Interrogation’ , the two together constituting the so-called ‘Recognition Duo’.
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  11.  8
    C. Concilio, M. D'Aiuto, S. Polizio: La tradizione metrica della tragedia greca . Preface by P. Volpe Cacciatore. Pp. 74. Naples: Università degli Studi di Salerno, Dipartimento di Scienze dell'Antichità, 2002. Paper, €7.50. No ISBN. [REVIEW]C. W. Willink - 2004 - The Classical Review 54 (01):240-.
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  12.  7
    Further Cirtical Notes on Euripides' Orestes.C. W. Willink - 2004 - Classical Quarterly 54 (02):424-440.
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  13.  7
    Sleep After Labour in Euripides' Heracles.C. W. Willink - 1988 - Classical Quarterly 38 (01):86-.
    πνοϲ, in general a common word in Greek tragedy, is a cardinal theme in the Heracles. In the first half of the play the glorious saving Labours of the warrior Hero with his bow, club and other weaponry are retrospectively evoked and further enacted. Repeated emphasis on this kind of ‘noble toil’ accords with the heroic definition of ρετ, which traditionally βανει διμχθω–8 the first strophe of the long First Stasimon in honour of Heracles ends with: μνῆϲαι ϲτεφνωμα μ– χθων (...)
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  14.  1
    Porter Studies in Euripides' Orestes. Leiden: Brill, 1994. Pp. Xiii + 364. Fl. 170, $109.75.C. W. Willink - 1996 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 116:195-196.
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  15.  6
    Some Problems of Text and Interpretation in the Bacchae. I.C. W. Willink - 1966 - Classical Quarterly 16 (01):27-.
    The following notes refer constantly to E. R. Dodds' Bacchae , which forms a valuable basis for study of the play; the passages discussed are those where I find myself in disagreement with Dodds' notes or with some new conjecture to offer, but everywhere my debt to the material he has assembled is very great. Recently W. S. Barrett's Hippolytos has illuminated a number of dark corners, providing a wealth of Euripidean parallels, metrical and linguistic; not least valuable is the (...)
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  16.  3
    Studies in Euripides' Orestes.C. W. Willink & J. R. Porter - 1996 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 116:195.
  17.  2
    Sophocles: Second Thoughts.C. W. Willink, H. Lloyd-Jones & N. G. Wilson - 2000 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 120:152.
  18.  2
    On the Transmission of the Bacchae.C. W. Willink - 1966 - Classical Quarterly 16 (02):347-.
    In the last number of CQ,, I mistakenly attributed to Professor Zuntz the view that P's exemplar was, before correction, the ‘parent’ of L. The possibility that the parent of L became, after corrections derived from its own parent , the parent of P is in fact considered by Zuntz only as an alternative to the hypothesis, propounded by him on p. 122 and set out in his stemma on p. 192, that the parent of P was a copy of (...)
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  19.  2
    A Problem in Aeschylus' Septem.C. W. Willink - 1968 - Classical Quarterly 18 (01):4-.
    A. ScT 803–21 are a notorious crux, which has received very varied treatment from editors without any clear solution of the problem emerging. A widely favoured version follows that of Weil, and disposes the lines as follows: 803–4 –6–7 or )–8–9–io )–ll )–21–I2 … 19– [20]. We may be able to concede the arbitrary transpositions of 805 and 821, since it is likely enough that the text is substantially disordered; more serious, however, are the inherent weaknesses in Weil's rearrangement.
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  20.  3
    Some Problems of Text and Interpretation in the Bacchae. II.C. W. Willink - 1966 - Classical Quarterly 16 (02):220-.
    In Part I of this article the major problems of the transmission of the Bacchae were considered, with a discussion of interpolated lines and lacunae, whether certain or merely postulated by previous editors. In the Introduction it was argued that P is a copy of a manuscript which was very like L before being supplemented with variant readings and with the whole of Tr. and Ba. 756 ff. from a lost source. The symbols λ and were used for P's exemplar (...)
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  21.  3
    Critical Studies in the Cantica of Sophocles: III. Electra, Philoctetes, Oedipus at Colonus.C. W. Willink - 2003 - Classical Quarterly 53 (1):75-110.
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  22.  3
    Some Problems of Text and Interpreation in the Hippolytus.C. W. Willink - 1968 - Classical Quarterly 18 (01):11-.
    Phaedra's long speech is one of the most important elements in Euripides’ most intricate play; we may confidently assume that with his surpassing interest in women and in rhetoric the dramatist will have lavished more than usual pains upon it. Interpretation of it has suffered in the past from false preconceptions and lexicological imprecision; the nature of the speech is such that we can be led far astray by a small misjudgement of the connotation of such words as at the (...)
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  23.  1
    Orestes.P. G. Mason, Euripides, C. W. Willink & M. L. West - 1989 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 109:220.
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  24.  1
    AlcestisPhoenician Women.C. W. Willink, Euripides, D. J. Conacher & E. Craik - 1990 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 110:219.
  25.  1
    Critical Studies in the Cantica of Sophocles: I. Antigone.C. W. Willink - 2001 - Classical Quarterly 51 (1):65-89.
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  26.  1
    Notes on the Parodos-Scene in Euripides' Heraclidae, 73–117.C. W. Willink - 1991 - Classical Quarterly 41 (02):525-.
    In response to Iolaus' cry for help, the chorus in Held, enter at a run , and the Parodos takes a form appropriate to that. Instead of choral song-and-dance, what follows, after an exceptionally brief non-strophic ‘entry’-passage, is an amoibaion first between the Chorus-leader and Iolaus, then between the Chorus-leader and the Herald, musical only as featuring some ‘half-chanted’ sequences in the Chorus-leader's utterances.
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  27.  2
    Euripides, Medea 1–45, 371–85.C. W. Willink - 1988 - Classical Quarterly 38 (02):313-.
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  28.  1
    Euripides, Supplices 42–70.C. W. Willink - 1992 - Classical Quarterly 42 (01):41-.
    In a previous article I discussed some textual and metrical issues in the lyric-iambic stanzas Supplices 71–8/79–86, and the problematic persona and constitution of the Chorus. The preceding maternal κεсα in four ionic stanzas presents fewer textual problems; but here too there is a challenging crux, at 45 in the first strophe; and there is more to be said about the ode's metrical structure. I begin with a metrical reappraisal, which will prove to have a bearing on the textual problem. (...)
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  29.  1
    Critical Studies in the Cantica of Sophocles: II. Ajax,Trachiniae, Oedipus Tyrannus.C. W. Willink - 2002 - Classical Quarterly 52 (1):50-80.
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  30. Euripides Alcestis. Ed. And Trans. D. J. Conacher. Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1988. Pp. V + 201. £28.00 , £9.95 . Phoenician Women. Ed. And Trans. E. Craik. Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1988. Pp. Ix + 274. £28.00 , £9.95. [REVIEW]C. W. Willink - 1990 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 110:219-220.
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  31. Euripides Hippolytus.C. W. Willink & W. Stockert - 1998 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 118:213.
  32. Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris 123–36.C. W. Willink - 2007 - Classical Quarterly 57 (02):746-749.
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  33. Euripides, Iphigenia in tauris 392–455.C. W. Willink - 2006 - Classical Quarterly 56 (02):404-.
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  34. Euripides, Supplices 71–86 and the Chorus of 'Attendants'.C. W. Willink - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (02):340-.
    The first choral ode of Euripides' Supplices, or the Parodos if that term can be used for an ode which is not an ‘entry’, ends with two stanzas of lyric-iambic threnody, following four stanzas of supplication in ionic metre As Collard comments, this structure is broadly similar to, and very possibly modelled upon, A. Pers. 65–114, 115–39. But there is an important difference here: prima facie, the ‘further∕different concerted lament’ in 71ff. is sung and performed by the πρсπολοι mentioned in (...)
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