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  1.  9
    The Unimaginable Touch of TropesRomanticism and Contemporary Criticism: The Gauss Seminar and Other Papers. [REVIEW]Timothy Bahti, Paul de Man, E. S. Burt, Kevin Newmark & Andrzej Warminski - 1995 - Diacritics 25 (4):39.
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  2.  6
    An Immoderate Taste for Truth": Censoring History in Baudelaire's "Les Bijoux.E. S. Burt - 1997 - Diacritics 27 (2):19-43.
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  3.  4
    Hospitality in Autobiography : Levinas Chez de Quincey.E. S. Burt - 2009 - In Donald R. Wehrs & David P. Haney (eds.), Levinas and Nineteenth-Century Literature: Ethics and Otherness From Romanticism Through Realism. University of Delaware Press.
    This chapter addresses the following questions: What would a Levinasian autobiography look like? Is such a thing imaginable? The question is directed in the first instance at autobiography, as a question concerning its ability to go beyond the representation of the subject to write the encounter with the absolute other for which Levinas's ethical philosophy calls. But it is also, in the second instance, a question for Levinas, concerning the potential of autobiography to represent an alterity perhaps not fully accounted (...)
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  4.  17
    Poetic Conceit: The Self-Portrait and Mirrors of InkMiroirs D'Encre. [REVIEW]E. S. Burt & Michel Beaujour - 1982 - Diacritics 12 (4):17.
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  5.  4
    The Autobiographical Subject and the Death Penalty.E. S. Burt - 2013 - Oxford Literary Review 35 (2):165-187.
    Why does writing of the death penalty demand the first-person treatment that it also excludes? The article investigates the role played by the autobiographical subject in Derrida's The Death Penalty, Volume I, where the confessing ‘I’ doubly supplements the philosophical investigation into what Derrida sees as a trend toward the worldwide abolition of the death penalty: first, to bring out the harmonies or discrepancies between the individual subject's beliefs, anxieties, desires and interests with respect to the death penalty and the (...)
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  6. The Right to a History.E. S. Burt - 2014 - Oxford Literary Review 36 (2):179-182.
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