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  1. added 2020-04-27
    Literature as Negative Theology: The Literary Absolute (1988) and Jean-Luc Nancy's Philosophical Method.Jack Robert June Edmunds-Coopey - manuscript
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  2. added 2020-04-27
    Kant on Poetry and Cognition.Iris Vidmar Jovanović - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (1):1-17.
    Our engagements with poetry often leave us with a sense of having been not only aesthetically pleased and emotionally aroused but intellectually stimulated and cognitively rewarded.1 However, explicating the nature of such intellectual stimulus and accounting for poetry’s cognitive values are not easy tasks, given that poetry does not stand in the same relation to truth and knowledge as do science and philosophy. How then to account for the undeniable experience of having undergone a profound cognitive change after engaging with (...)
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  3. added 2020-04-27
    The Value of Fidelity in Adaptation.James Harold - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):89-100.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comThe adaptation of literary works into films has been almost completely neglected as a philosophical topic. I discuss two questions about this phenomenon:What do we mean when we say that a film is faithful to its source?Is being faithful to its source a merit in a film adaptation?In response to, I set out two distinct (...)
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  4. added 2020-04-27
    Nietzsche Among the Novelists.Theodore Ziolkowski - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):323-343.
    The Weimar Nietzsche-Bibliographie, which is available online along with an exhaustive index, contains hundreds of entries, ranging from "absolute Musik" to "Zynismus." But despite references to his treatment in film and to the names of several novelists, it provides no rubric for Friedrich Nietzsche in novels or otherwise as a fictional figure.Yet the twenty-first century alone has already produced at least four such works, in addition to two others over the preceding eighty years—not to mention films in Italian and French. (...)
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  5. added 2020-04-27
    Flannery O'Connor's Mrs. Turpin, Hannah Arendt's Adolf Eichmann, and Dreams of Boxcars.Jennifer Ruth - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):165-184.
    What I learned from you and what helped me in the ensuing years to find my way around in reality without selling my soul to it the way people in earlier times sold their souls to the devil is that the only thing of importance is not philosophies but the truth, that one has to live and think in the open and not in one's own little shell, no matter how comfortably furnished it is, and that necessity in whatever form (...)
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  6. added 2020-04-27
    The Art of "Reading-To" and the Post-Holocaust Suicide in Schlink's The Reader.Michael Lackey - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):145-164.
    The post-Holocaust suicide of a concentration camp survivor is particularly unsettling. One thinks, for instance, of Cliff Stern's devastated response to Professor Louis Levy's death in Woody Allen's movie Crimes and Misdemeanors. Loosely based on Primo Levi, Allen's professor provides in short documentary clips an astute analysis of the contradictions of a loving God in the Old Testament and stoically counsels embracing life despite the indifference and occasional cruelty of the universe. Having experienced, understood, and accepted the absurdity and injustice (...)
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  7. added 2020-04-27
    Vivre la philosophie : les Mémoires comme œuvre philosophique.Manon Garcia - 2018 - Littérature 191:53-67.
    English Title “Living Philosophy: Beauvoir’s Memoirs as a philosophical ‘œuvre’”. This paper seeks to remedy the lack of philosophical analyses of the philosophical dimension of Beauvoir’s autobiographical work in using the existentialist link Beauvoir establishes between life and philosophy to make three points: first, her Memoirs constitute a crucial documentary resource to understand Beauvoir’s essays and the original philosophical stance she defends in them. Second, Memoirs show a two-way relationship between philosophy and life, on an epistemic and on a practical (...)
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  8. added 2020-04-27
    Murder and Midwifery: Metaphor in the Theaetetus.Madeline Martin-Seaver - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):97-111.
    The Theaetetus's midwifery metaphor is well-known; less discussed is the brief passage accusing Socrates of behaving like Antaeus. Are philosophers midwives or monsters? Socrates accepts both characterizations. This passage and Socrates's acceptance of the metaphor creates a tension in the text, birthing a puzzle about how readers ought to understand the figure of the philosopher. Because metaphors play a pivotal role in the dialogue's ethical project, the puzzle presents not simply a textual tension but a question of how and why (...)
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  9. added 2020-04-27
    Evolution and Literary Studies: Time to Evolve.David Fishelov - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):272-289.
    During the past couple of decades the evolutionary approach to literary studies has gained momentum and produced a growing number of studies and thought-provoking debates.1 The time has come to reexamine core assumptions of the evolutionary approach to literary studies and to offer several conceptual and methodological clarifications. Without such clarifications this attractive and high-profile approach would have become an ephemeral mutation rather than an enduring and fruitful branch of literary studies. The use of biological terms in literary studies is (...)
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  10. added 2020-04-27
    Non-Fictional Narrators in Fictional Narratives.Christian Folde - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (4):389-405.
    This paper is about non-fictional objects in fictions and their role as narrators. Two central claims are advanced. In part 1 it is argued that non-fictional objects such as you and me can be part of fictions. This commonsensical idea is elaborated and defended against objections. Building on it, it is argued in part 2 that non-fictional objects can be characters and narrators in fictional narratives. As a consequence, three fundamental and popular claims concerning narrators are rejected. In particular, it (...)
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  11. added 2020-04-27
    The Abyss of Freedom: Love and Legitimacy in Constant’s Adolphe.Joshua Landy - 2009 - Nineteenth Century French Studies 3 (37):193-213.
    Despite its superficial similarities with Rousseau's Confessions, Constant's Adolphe functions in fact as a devastating critique from within of the entire autobiographical project. Proceeding from the threefold assumption that the soul is irremediably divided, self-opaque, and untranslatable into language, it interrogates the very feasibility of autobiography, implicitly presenting its protagonist's maxims (which only appear to be the fruits of experience altruistically shared) and his claim never to have loved (which only appears to be brutally honest, but is a curious act (...)
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  12. added 2020-04-27
    A Historical Theory of Art Criticism.James D. Carney - 1994 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 28 (1):13.
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  13. added 2020-04-27
    Literary Criticism: Plato to DrydenLiterary Criticism: Pope to Croce.E. N. B., Allan H. Gilbert, Gay W. Allen & Harry H. Clark - 1942 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 2 (5):75.
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  14. added 2020-02-07
    Fictive Utterance And Imagining II.Stacie Friend - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):163-180.
    The currently standard approach to fiction is to define it in terms of imagination. I have argued elsewhere that no conception of imagining is sufficient to distinguish a response appropriate to fiction as opposed to non-fiction. In her contribution Kathleen Stock seeks to refute this objection by providing a more sophisticated account of the kind of propositional imagining prescribed by so-called ‘fictive utterances’. I argue that although Stock's proposal improves on other theories, it too fails to provide an adequate criterion (...)
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  15. added 2020-01-13
    Woolf and Schopenhauer: Artistic Theory and Practice.James Acheson - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):38-53.
    Virginia Woolf mentions the philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer by name only once in her writings, in a book review published in the Times Literary Supplement in 1917.1 Viscount Harberton, author of the book she is reviewing, argues initially that knowledge gained from books is inferior to that derived from practical experience, but later makes a special case for two writers—Schopenhauer and Herbert Spencer. "No praise is too high for them," comments Woolf sarcastically. In "their books, we are told, we shall find (...)
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  16. added 2020-01-13
    The Individual ‘We’ Narrator.Mattia Gallotti & Raphael Lyne - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (2):ayy051.
    The prevailing assumption in literary studies tends to be that a ‘we’ narrative voice is either that of an individual purporting to speak for a group, or that of a collective of people whose perspectives have coalesced into a unified one. Recent work on social agency across the cognitive humanities suggests another way of understanding what might be conveyed by such a ‘we’. Social cognition research shows that individuals can have their capacities changed and enhanced when they interact with others, (...)
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  17. added 2020-01-13
    Deconstruction: A Misprision of Saussure and Charles Sanders Peirce.Leon Surette - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):411-440.
    Poetic influence—when it involves two strong, authentic poets—always proceeds by a misreading of the prior poet, an act of creative correction that is actually, and necessarily, a misinterpretation. The history of fruitful poetic influence, which is to say the main tradition of Western poetry since the Renaissance, is a history of anxiety, and self-saving caricature, of distortion, of perverse, wilful revisionism without which modern poetry as such could not exist.1Jacques Derrida is a philosopher, not a poet, but his co-optation of (...)
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  18. added 2020-01-13
    The Immersion Method II (Logic & Malcolm X).Virgil W. Brower - 2012 - Inside Higher Ed, May 3.
  19. added 2020-01-13
    Speech & Oral Phenomena: Memory, Mouth, Writing, Life-Death.Virgil W. Brower - 2011 - French Literature Series 38:209-230.
    Following one of Jacques Derrida’s early questions — namely, How is writing involved in speech? — this essay reconsiders the role of the tongue and the sense of taste in the oral phenomena of speaking and saying. The contact the tongue makes with the mouth or teeth is just as much a materialization of language as what is commonly called “writing.” The tongue acts as a pen and the mouth, as a blank page (or palimpsest). Mouthed writing is accompanied by (...)
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  20. added 2020-01-13
    Il lettore sedotto o della circolarità ermeneutica di retorica ed estetica.Marco Castagna - 2003 - In S. Bonfiglioli & C. Marmo (eds.), Retorica e scienze del linguaggio. Teorie e pratiche dell'argomentazione e della persuasione. Roma RM, Italia: pp. 351-360.
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  21. added 2020-01-13
    Wittgenstein and Modernism.Michael Fischer - 1986 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):463-466.
    Even in a journal with the welcoming title Philosophy and Literature, contributors rightly feel obliged to explain why they are relating philosophical and literary texts to one another. Seeing literature as an engagingly vivid, "speaking picture" "figuring forth" the difficult abstractions of philosophy was once a default way of linking the two. But such a connection shortchanges the thinking at work in literature, reducing it to a popularizing tool, and overlooks the stories, examples, and metaphors that inform some powerful works (...)
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  22. added 2020-01-13
    Macherey and Marxist Literary Theory.Terry Eagleton - 1982 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 14:145-155.
    A resurgence of interest in the materialist aesthetics of Walter Benjamin and Bertolt Brecht has helped to free Marxist criticism from the neo-Hegelian forms within which it has long been imprisoned. Yet the central category of those materialist aesthetics—the ‘author as producer’—remains a transitional concept, potently demystificatory but politically indeterminate. And crucial though the analysis of the relations between ‘base’ and ‘superstructure’ within art itself clearly is, its historical explanatory power is not yet fully evident. The moment of Brecht, for (...)
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  23. added 2020-01-05
    Moral Density: Why Teaching Art is Teaching Ethics.John Rethorst - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):155-172.
    Beauty is truth, truth beauty.If this epigraph only rarely escapes English class, something like it has fascinated philosophers for a long time. Iris Murdoch remembers that "Kant said that beauty was an analogon of good, Plato said it was the nearest clue."2 I want to go further and posit that our means of perception of the aesthetic and the ethical share an organic connection, an understanding of which will help elucidate moral perception, a critical component of moral education.Or moral education (...)
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  24. added 2020-01-05
    The Philosophy of Decadence.Nicholas D. More - 2019 - In Jane Desmarais & David Weir (ed.), Cambridge Critical Concepts: Decadence and Literature. Cambridge, UK: pp. 184-199.
    The chapter outlines Nietzsche's view of decadence, its history and effects. The philosopher held decadence to be any condition, deceptively thought good, which limits what something or someone can be. This concept informs his critical and affirmative projects, acting as a versatile tool to identify and overcome his own decadence and to resist the decadence of Western culture. Decadence appears in five major areas of concern to Nietzsche: physiology; psychology; art and artists; politics; and philosophy. Physical and mental phenomena provide (...)
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  25. added 2020-01-05
    The Truth That Hurts, or the Corps À Corps of Tongues: An Interview with Jacques Derrida.Thomas Clément Mercier, Jacques Derrida & Évelyne Grossman - 2019 - Parallax 25 (1):8-24.
    In this 2004 interview — translated into English and published in its entirety for the first time — Jacques Derrida reflects upon his practices of writing and teaching, about the community of his readers, and explores questions related to corporeity and textuality, sexual difference, desire, politics, Marxism, violence, truth, interpretation, and translation. In the course of the interview, Derrida discusses the work of Martin Heidegger, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Maurice Blanchot, Hélène Cixous, Jean Genet, Paul Celan, and many others.
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  26. added 2020-01-05
    The "Analytic"/"Continental" Divide and the Question of Philosophy's Relation to Literature.Andreas Vrahimis - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):253-269.
    The history of the writing of philosophy could be seen as divided between two tendencies. One tendency involves a constant reconfiguration of the literary and stylistic elements involved in the way philosophy is written. Examples include most texts in the philosophical canon, from Plato's dialogues, or Aristotle's lecture notes, to Marcus Aurelius's diary, Augustine's confessions, the pseudepigrapha of the Areopagite, Anselm's prayer, Montaigne's essays, Descartes's meditations, Kierkegaard's play with pseudonymy, or Wittgenstein's "remarks."1 In such texts, we find a self-reflective attitude (...)
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  27. added 2020-01-05
    The Performance of Reading: An Essay in the Philosophy of Literature by Peter Kivy. [REVIEW]Inês Morais - 2017 - Forma de Vida 84.
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  28. added 2020-01-05
    Bibiographie résumée des travaux de Mitsou Ronat.Pierre Pica - 1986 - Recherches Linguistiques de Vincennes 14:207-222.
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  29. added 2019-11-10
    Peirce as a Writer.Vincent M. Colapietro - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):384-410.
    C. S. Peirce’s writings are instructive in a number of ways, not least of all for how they, in part despite themselves, assist us in conceiving what he was so strongly disposed to disparage, literary discourse. He possessed greater linguistic facility and deeper literary sensibility than he appreciated, though a militantly polemical identity helped to insure he left this facility undeveloped and this sensibility unacknowledged.2 For this and other reasons, a study of Peirce as a writer is worthwhile. It is (...)
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  30. added 2019-11-10
    What Do We Mean When We Talk About Transcendence? Plato and Virginia Woolf.Robert Baker - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):312-335.
    The Axial Age is an expression invented by Karl Jaspers to refer to a period around the middle of the first millennium, or running from the middle of the first millennium to its end, during which a range of major religions either emerged or were transformed in different places around the world: Confucianism and Taoism in China, Hinduism and Buddhism in India, Zoroastrianism in Persia, Platonism in Greece, and prophetic Judaism in Palestine.1 Platonism, to be sure, is not exactly a (...)
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  31. added 2019-09-09
    Extracting Fictional Truth From Unreliable Sources.Emar Maier & Merel Semeijn - manuscript
    A fictional text is commonly viewed as constituting an invitation to play a certain game of make-believe, with the individual sentences written by the author providing the propositions we are to imagine and/or accept as true within the fiction. However, we can’t always take the text at face value. What narratologists call ‘unreliable narrators’ may present a confused or misleading picture of the fictional world. Meanwhile there has been a debate in philosophy about so-called ‘imaginative resistance’ in which we are (...)
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  32. added 2019-06-06
    Letting Oneself Go: "Of Anger" and Montaigne's Ethical Reflections.David Quint - 2000 - Philosophy and Literature 24 (1):126-137.
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  33. added 2018-01-10
    Del Ser Nacional y Otras Ficciones. A Propósito de Efrén Giraldo, Negroides, Simuladores, Melancólicos. El Ser Nacional En El Ensayo Literario Colombiano Del Siglo XX. [REVIEW]Carlos Vanegas - 2013 - Co-herencia:257-261.
    Autores como Lukács o Adorno, por solo mencionar algunos nombres del siglo XX, han visto en el ensayo uno de los géneros literarios fundamentales para la expresión y exposición de ideas, con el bemol de que el ensayo siempre está en conflicto con otras plataformas de conocimiento, como las del orden establecido por la institución y la academia. Desde una postura compartida, el ensayista y crítico Efrén Giraldo se ha preocupado por la reinvindicación del ensayo literario, como una fuente de (...)
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  34. added 2017-04-12
    El Humanismo de Humberto Sábato: ¿Visionario Del Último Engranaje?R. González - 2012 - Mapocho (72):13-26.
    Este es un ensayo homenaje a Ernesto Sábato, quien además de un connotado novelista fue un acérrimo crítico de la ciencia moderna y contemporánea, al plantear que reducir toda la realidad a las matemáticas ha favorecido la deshumanización y maquinización de la naturaleza y del hombre. Sin embargo, la tesis que se defiende aquí es que Sábato no fue igualmente perspicaz previendo de qué forma la Inteligencia Artificial clásica podría representar el pináculo de la deshumanización del hombre, pues esta considera (...)
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  35. added 2017-02-15
    Montaigne and the Quality of Mercy: Ethical and Political Themes in the Essais. By David Quint.E. Campion - 1999 - The European Legacy 4:109-109.
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  36. added 2017-02-15
    Getting Into the Act: Autobiography as Theory and Performance.Lead D. Hewitt - 1987 - Substance 16 (1):32.
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  37. added 2017-02-09
    The New Art of Autobiography: An Essay on the "Life of Giambattista Vico Written by Himself," (Review).Julia Watson - 1993 - Philosophy and Literature 17 (1):136-137.
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  38. added 2017-02-01
    Autobiography of an Aesthetics.Stephen C. Pepper - 1970 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 28 (3):275-286.
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  39. added 2017-01-30
    "Sociable Wisdom": Montaigne's Transformation of Philosophy.Ann Hartle - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):285-304.
    Montaigne’s last words in the Essays—the words that capture his entire project—are “sociable wisdom.” Philosophy has been transformed from the “love of wisdom” to “sociable wisdom” and this transformation is, at the same time, the transformation of the human world, the production of society, a new mode of human association. What is “sociable wisdom” and how has it produced this remarkable effect?Philosophy means “the love of wisdom.” Although the term is believed to have been used first by Pythagoras, Socrates presents (...)
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  40. added 2017-01-29
    Montaigne on Witches and the Authority of Religion in the Public Sphere: MontaigneMichel De,.1533-1592Des Boiteux.Brian Ribeiro - 2009 - Philosophy and Literature 33 (2):235-251.
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  41. added 2017-01-29
    Hugo Friedrich's "Montaigne".Richard L. Regosin - 1992 - Philosophy and Literature 16 (1):134.
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  42. added 2017-01-29
    From Right to Left: An Autobiography.Frederick Vanderbilt Field - 1984 - Science and Society 48 (3):362-364.
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  43. added 2017-01-29
    An Autobiography. By Howard Hannay. [REVIEW]R. G. Collingwood - 1940 - Ethics 51:369.
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  44. added 2017-01-29
    An Autobiography.Alexander Bain - 1905 - International Journal of Ethics 15 (2):241-244.
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  45. added 2017-01-28
    "Walter Pater's Art of Autobiography": Gerald Monsman. [REVIEW]Ian Small - 1982 - British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (3):284.
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  46. added 2017-01-28
    Duncan Dancer: An Autobiography.Irma Duncan - 1966 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 25 (2):228-228.
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  47. added 2017-01-28
    Autobiography.Henry James & Frederick W. Dupee - 1957 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 15 (4):493-494.
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  48. added 2017-01-28
    Autobiography.Eric Gill - 1942 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 2 (5):72-73.
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  49. added 2017-01-27
    Montaigne and the Quality of Mercy: Ethical and Political Themes in the Essais (Review).Patrick Patrick Gerard Henry - 1998 - Philosophy and Literature 22 (1):258-260.
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  50. added 2017-01-27
    Autobiography as Enigma.Elisabeth Cardonne-Arlyck & Steven Vogel - 1989 - Substance 18 (3):30.
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