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  1. Extracting Fictional Truth From Unreliable Sources.Emar Maier & Merel Semeijn - forthcoming - In Emar Maier & Andreas Stokke (eds.), The Language of Fiction. Oxford University Press.
    A fictional text is commonly viewed as constituting an invitation to play a certain game of make-believe, with the individual sentences written by the author providing the propositions we are to imagine and/or accept as true within the fiction. However, we can’t always take the text at face value. What narratologists call ‘unreliable narrators’ may present a confused or misleading picture of the fictional world. Meanwhile there has been a debate in philosophy about so-called ‘imaginative resistance’ in which we are (...)
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  2. Close Reading, Epistemology, and Affect: Nabokov After Rorty.Doug Battersby - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):323-349.
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  3. Reason as the Death of Fathers: Plato's Sophist and the Ghost's Command in Hamlet.Erich Freiberger - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):272-297.
  4. Charlie Chaplin and Aristotle: The Mechanics of Ending City Lights.Roy Glassberg - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):492-494.
    In the words of film critic Roger Ebert, "The last scene of City Lights is justly famous as one of the great emotional moments in the movies."1 What accounts for its success? In the course of what follows I will suggest that a pair of structural elements—reversal and recognition, first described by Aristotle—underlie the scene, and account in large measure for its emotive power.The scene is available for viewing on the internet by searching on "City Lights last scene." For those (...)
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  5. "The Politics of the Classroom Are Not the Politics of the World": An Unpublished Speech by Edward W. Said.Daniel Gordon - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):380-394.
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  6. Kant on Poetry and Cognition.Iris Vidmar Jovanović - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (1):1-17.
    Our engagements with poetry often leave us with a sense of having been not only aesthetically pleased and emotionally aroused but intellectually stimulated and cognitively rewarded.1 However, explicating the nature of such intellectual stimulus and accounting for poetry’s cognitive values are not easy tasks, given that poetry does not stand in the same relation to truth and knowledge as do science and philosophy. How then to account for the undeniable experience of having undergone a profound cognitive change after engaging with (...)
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  7. Know Thyself: Emerson's Pedagogy of Recollection.Nathan A. Jung - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):350-365.
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  8. Odysseás Elytis's Conversation with Heraclitus: "Of Ephesus".J. H. Lesher - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):226-236.
  9. Leo Tolstoy (Critical Lives). By Andrei Zorin. Pp. 219. London: Reaktion Books, 2020, £11.99.Patrick Madigan - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):568-568.
  10. Women and National Socialism in Postwar German Literature: Gender, Memory, and Subjectivity. By Katherine Stone. Pp. 232, Rochester, NY, Camden House, 2017, $65.00. [REVIEW]Patrick Madigan - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):580-581.
  11. Aesthetic Ineffability and the Rebirth of the Reader.Venkat Ramanan - 2020 - Aesthetics Research Lab 1.
    The ineffable experience in literature may be a product of both the author and the reader. There is similarly a need for a confluence between the artist and viewer in other art forms too for ineffability to arise.
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  12. Literary Criticism and Politics?Edward W. Said - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):395-401.
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  13. Incomplete Enlightenment: Edgar Reitz's The End of the Future and the Aesthetics of Suffering.Rudolphus Teeuwen - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):255-271.
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  14. Woolf and Schopenhauer: Artistic Theory and Practice.James Acheson - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):38-53.
    Virginia Woolf mentions the philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer by name only once in her writings, in a book review published in the Times Literary Supplement in 1917.1 Viscount Harberton, author of the book she is reviewing, argues initially that knowledge gained from books is inferior to that derived from practical experience, but later makes a special case for two writers—Schopenhauer and Herbert Spencer. "No praise is too high for them," comments Woolf sarcastically. In "their books, we are told, we shall find (...)
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  15. What Do We Mean When We Talk About Transcendence? Plato and Virginia Woolf.Robert Baker - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):312-335.
    The Axial Age is an expression invented by Karl Jaspers to refer to a period around the middle of the first millennium, or running from the middle of the first millennium to its end, during which a range of major religions either emerged or were transformed in different places around the world: Confucianism and Taoism in China, Hinduism and Buddhism in India, Zoroastrianism in Persia, Platonism in Greece, and prophetic Judaism in Palestine.1 Platonism, to be sure, is not exactly a (...)
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  16. Peirce as a Writer.Vincent M. Colapietro - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):384-410.
    C. S. Peirce’s writings are instructive in a number of ways, not least of all for how they, in part despite themselves, assist us in conceiving what he was so strongly disposed to disparage, literary discourse. He possessed greater linguistic facility and deeper literary sensibility than he appreciated, though a militantly polemical identity helped to insure he left this facility undeveloped and this sensibility unacknowledged.2 For this and other reasons, a study of Peirce as a writer is worthwhile. It is (...)
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  17. The Individual ‘We’ Narrator.Mattia Gallotti & Raphael Lyne - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (2):ayy051.
    The prevailing assumption in literary studies tends to be that a ‘we’ narrative voice is either that of an individual purporting to speak for a group, or that of a collective of people whose perspectives have coalesced into a unified one. Recent work on social agency across the cognitive humanities suggests another way of understanding what might be conveyed by such a ‘we’. Social cognition research shows that individuals can have their capacities changed and enhanced when they interact with others, (...)
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  18. The Truth That Hurts, or the Corps À Corps of Tongues: An Interview with Jacques Derrida.Thomas Clément Mercier, Jacques Derrida & Évelyne Grossman - 2019 - Parallax 25 (1):8-24.
    In this 2004 interview — translated into English and published in its entirety for the first time — Jacques Derrida reflects upon his practices of writing and teaching, about the community of his readers, and explores questions related to corporeity and textuality, sexual difference, desire, politics, Marxism, violence, truth, interpretation, and translation. In the course of the interview, Derrida discusses the work of Martin Heidegger, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Maurice Blanchot, Hélène Cixous, Jean Genet, Paul Celan, and many others.
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  19. The Philosophy of Decadence.Nicholas D. More - 2019 - In Jane Desmarais & David Weir (ed.), Cambridge Critical Concepts: Decadence and Literature. Cambridge, UK: pp. 184-199.
    The chapter outlines Nietzsche's view of decadence, its history and effects. The philosopher held decadence to be any condition, deceptively thought good, which limits what something or someone can be. This concept informs his critical and affirmative projects, acting as a versatile tool to identify and overcome his own decadence and to resist the decadence of Western culture. Decadence appears in five major areas of concern to Nietzsche: physiology; psychology; art and artists; politics; and philosophy. Physical and mental phenomena provide (...)
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  20. Moral Density: Why Teaching Art is Teaching Ethics.John Rethorst - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):155-172.
    Beauty is truth, truth beauty.If this epigraph only rarely escapes English class, something like it has fascinated philosophers for a long time. Iris Murdoch remembers that "Kant said that beauty was an analogon of good, Plato said it was the nearest clue."2 I want to go further and posit that our means of perception of the aesthetic and the ethical share an organic connection, an understanding of which will help elucidate moral perception, a critical component of moral education.Or moral education (...)
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  21. Deconstruction: A Misprision of Saussure and Charles Sanders Peirce.Leon Surette - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):411-440.
    Poetic influence—when it involves two strong, authentic poets—always proceeds by a misreading of the prior poet, an act of creative correction that is actually, and necessarily, a misinterpretation. The history of fruitful poetic influence, which is to say the main tradition of Western poetry since the Renaissance, is a history of anxiety, and self-saving caricature, of distortion, of perverse, wilful revisionism without which modern poetry as such could not exist.1Jacques Derrida is a philosopher, not a poet, but his co-optation of (...)
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  22. The "Analytic"/"Continental" Divide and the Question of Philosophy's Relation to Literature.Andreas Vrahimis - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):253-269.
    The history of the writing of philosophy could be seen as divided between two tendencies. One tendency involves a constant reconfiguration of the literary and stylistic elements involved in the way philosophy is written. Examples include most texts in the philosophical canon, from Plato's dialogues, or Aristotle's lecture notes, to Marcus Aurelius's diary, Augustine's confessions, the pseudepigrapha of the Areopagite, Anselm's prayer, Montaigne's essays, Descartes's meditations, Kierkegaard's play with pseudonymy, or Wittgenstein's "remarks."1 In such texts, we find a self-reflective attitude (...)
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  23. Vivre la philosophie : les Mémoires comme œuvre philosophique.Manon Garcia - 2018 - Littérature 191:53-67.
    English Title “Living Philosophy: Beauvoir’s Memoirs as a philosophical ‘œuvre’”. This paper seeks to remedy the lack of philosophical analyses of the philosophical dimension of Beauvoir’s autobiographical work in using the existentialist link Beauvoir establishes between life and philosophy to make three points: first, her Memoirs constitute a crucial documentary resource to understand Beauvoir’s essays and the original philosophical stance she defends in them. Second, Memoirs show a two-way relationship between philosophy and life, on an epistemic and on a practical (...)
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  24. The Value of Fidelity in Adaptation.James Harold - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):89-100.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comThe adaptation of literary works into films has been almost completely neglected as a philosophical topic. I discuss two questions about this phenomenon:What do we mean when we say that a film is faithful to its source?Is being faithful to its source a merit in a film adaptation?In response to, I set out two distinct (...)
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  25. The Art of "Reading-To" and the Post-Holocaust Suicide in Schlink's The Reader.Michael Lackey - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):145-164.
    The post-Holocaust suicide of a concentration camp survivor is particularly unsettling. One thinks, for instance, of Cliff Stern's devastated response to Professor Louis Levy's death in Woody Allen's movie Crimes and Misdemeanors. Loosely based on Primo Levi, Allen's professor provides in short documentary clips an astute analysis of the contradictions of a loving God in the Old Testament and stoically counsels embracing life despite the indifference and occasional cruelty of the universe. Having experienced, understood, and accepted the absurdity and injustice (...)
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  26. Murder and Midwifery: Metaphor in the Theaetetus.Madeline Martin-Seaver - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):97-111.
    The Theaetetus's midwifery metaphor is well-known; less discussed is the brief passage accusing Socrates of behaving like Antaeus. Are philosophers midwives or monsters? Socrates accepts both characterizations. This passage and Socrates's acceptance of the metaphor creates a tension in the text, birthing a puzzle about how readers ought to understand the figure of the philosopher. Because metaphors play a pivotal role in the dialogue's ethical project, the puzzle presents not simply a textual tension but a question of how and why (...)
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  27. Flannery O'Connor's Mrs. Turpin, Hannah Arendt's Adolf Eichmann, and Dreams of Boxcars.Jennifer Ruth - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):165-184.
    What I learned from you and what helped me in the ensuing years to find my way around in reality without selling my soul to it the way people in earlier times sold their souls to the devil is that the only thing of importance is not philosophies but the truth, that one has to live and think in the open and not in one's own little shell, no matter how comfortably furnished it is, and that necessity in whatever form (...)
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  28. Nietzsche Among the Novelists.Theodore Ziolkowski - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):323-343.
    The Weimar Nietzsche-Bibliographie, which is available online along with an exhaustive index, contains hundreds of entries, ranging from "absolute Musik" to "Zynismus." But despite references to his treatment in film and to the names of several novelists, it provides no rubric for Friedrich Nietzsche in novels or otherwise as a fictional figure.Yet the twenty-first century alone has already produced at least four such works, in addition to two others over the preceding eighty years—not to mention films in Italian and French. (...)
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  29. Evolution and Literary Studies: Time to Evolve.David Fishelov - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):272-289.
    During the past couple of decades the evolutionary approach to literary studies has gained momentum and produced a growing number of studies and thought-provoking debates.1 The time has come to reexamine core assumptions of the evolutionary approach to literary studies and to offer several conceptual and methodological clarifications. Without such clarifications this attractive and high-profile approach would have become an ephemeral mutation rather than an enduring and fruitful branch of literary studies. The use of biological terms in literary studies is (...)
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  30. Non-Fictional Narrators in Fictional Narratives.Christian Folde - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (4):389-405.
    This paper is about non-fictional objects in fictions and their role as narrators. Two central claims are advanced. In part 1 it is argued that non-fictional objects such as you and me can be part of fictions. This commonsensical idea is elaborated and defended against objections. Building on it, it is argued in part 2 that non-fictional objects can be characters and narrators in fictional narratives. As a consequence, three fundamental and popular claims concerning narrators are rejected. In particular, it (...)
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  31. Creativity and Pedagogy in Leavis.Michael Bell - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):171-188.
    I never heard or met F. R. Leavis personally, but like many others I have felt the impact of his writing as teaching and would like to reflect on its nature in that regard. His published criticism is strongly inflected toward the purposes of teaching. His notorious exclusions, for example, of authors he knew very well are partly directed to the practical consideration of how much a conscientious student can read attentively in a three-year degree syllabus, and what reading in (...)
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  32. The Function of Kant's Miltonic Citations on a Page of the Opus Postumum.Sanford Budick - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):76-97.
    On one manuscript page of the Opus postumum Kant twice recurs to a passage from Paradise Lost that, seven years earlier, he had cited to exemplify aesthetic ideas and the concept of succession.1 Now he calls on these same verses to perform an additional function, namely, to represent the a priori idea of a community of reciprocity. For Kant, the “insertion” of this idea serves as an “actus of cognition” that can enable experience of the “subjectively actual”.2In the cited passage (...)
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  33. Thinking with Literature: Towards a Cognitive Criticism.Terence Cave - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Thinking with Literature offers a succinct introduction to a cognitive literary criticsm, broad in scope but focusing on a particular cluster of approaches, some of which have so far been little used. Explanatory chapters and sections alternate with close readings of literary texts from a wide range of different periods and genres. The literary readings are not mere 'examples' of cognitive topics, still less of hypotheses in cognitive science: the central argument is that cognitive criticism must draw its primary energies (...)
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  34. WAXLER, ROBERT P. The Risk of Reading: How Literature Helps Us to Understand Ourselves and the World. New York: Bloomsbury, 2014, Vii + 191 Pp., $77.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]E. M. Dadlez - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):310-311.
  35. Leavis on Tragedy.Paul Dean - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):189-205.
    Returning from the Great War to Cambridge in 1919, F. R. Leavis switched from studying history to studying English. It’s not hard to see why. The academic study of history must have seemed monstrously unreal to him after what he had been through, and the fledgling English School offered, as he later said, “a creative response to change—change in society and civilization that had been made unignorable by the war,”1 in contrast to the Oxford course, which reflected “the habit instilled (...)
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  36. ALTIERI, CHARLES. Reckoning with the Imagination: Wittgenstein and the Aesthetics of Literary Experience. Cornell University Press, 2015, Xii + 262 Pp., $79.95 Cloth, $28.95 Paper. [REVIEW]Richard Eldridge - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):306-307.
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  37. Leavis and Wittgenstein.Bernard Harrison - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):206-225.
    I think of myself as an anti-philosopher, which is what a literary critic ought to be.For a number of years my work has been partly occupied with the examination of various points of contact between philosophy and literature. It involved, however, no more than marginal reference to the work of F. R. Leavis, certainly because of a culpable lack on my part of extended acquaintance with his work, but also to some extent, no doubt, because of Leavis’s own resolute denial (...)
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  38. Rethinking Leavis.Chris Joyce - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):137-156.
    “What is a word?”1 The question was not asked in the expectation of a definitive answer, for words of their nature—as he saw—cannot readily provide one. It is of course a truism that all definitions are made of words, but Leavis was apt to point out that the meanings of many important words resist full lexical definition. Their being thus resistant is often a mark of their importance.2 By a very different route, Wittgenstein arrived at an “answer” akin to that (...)
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  39. Diurno e Noturno no pensamento de Gaston Bachelard.Fernando Machado - 2016 - Cadernos Do Pet Filosofia 7 (13):11-23.
    O presente artigo tem por objetivo caracterizar as duas fases do pensamento bachelardiano intituladas diurna e noturna e o modo como determinadas noções que permeiam as duas etapas da filosofia do autor configuram uma comunicação recíproca entre elas, fazendo com que haja uma troca assídua de valores entre ambas as vertentes. Deste modo, tentar-se-á demonstrar o quanto o fluxo de uma fase a outra de seu pensamento denota um sentido de completude ao invés de desconexão, negação ou mesmo oposição. Conceitos (...)
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  40. Introduction.Danièle Moyal-Sharrock - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):124-126.
    Leavis would not have approved of the third epithet in our title. He saw himself as an “anti-philosopher”—philosophers being thinkers who reduce thought to “isms.” Leavis was clear that he was neither a theorist nor a philosopher, but as a literary critic he could not avoid thinking about the kind of existence works of literature have, and how they can be forms of thought. In “Leavisian Thinking,” Ian Robinson shows how this led him to develop the idea of the “third (...)
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  41. Leavisian Thinking.Ian Robinson - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):127-136.
    Iknow that some people find that Leavis’s mode of thought and what he had to say about thinking are obscure or difficult. We are dealing with some profound matters, but some profundities can be elucidated as well in twenty minutes as twenty years. I think the subject can be treated briefly and lucidly, and the challenge to me is to do so.What counts as thinking? What does it cover? Narrow the question immediately to thinking about, so as to avoid tricky (...)
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  42. Absolute Pitch and Exquisite Rightness of Tone.Paul Standish - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):226-239.
    Wittgenstein was apparently looking for someone else. It was because he had not been successful that he had knocked at the Leavises’ door, to bide his time there before he looked again. On entering the house, he immediately peered through the window into the street. Yet after a moment he turned and said abruptly: “You’ve got a gramophone, I see—I don’t suppose you’ve anything worth playing.” And “Then,” so Leavis continues the description,with a marked change of tone, he exclaimed “Ah!”: (...)
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  43. The Myth of Narcissus as a Surreptitious Allegory About Creativity.Greg Stone - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):273-284.
    Perhaps no myth is more misunderstood than the story of Narcissus, who is erroneously thought to be self-absorbed, egotistical, and vain. Adding to the confusion, a growth industry on narcissism has emerged in academic circles. case in point: Professor Daniel Ames of columbia business School devised a brief personality test with sixteen binary choices such as “I am going to be a great person” or “I hope I am going to be successful.”1 One student did so “well” that he boasted (...)
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  44. Philosophy as Translation.Barbara Agnese & Claire-Anne Gormally - 2015 - Substance 44 (2):15-29.
    The necessity of reconsidering and rethinking the aesthetics of a literary genre is not a novelty. Now that the traditional distinction between argumentative theory patterns and narrative styles of thinking has blurred, the relationship between philosophy and literature raises a principal question: the definition of philosophy itself and of philosophical activity. Modern literature, and in particular the novel of the last century, embodies a polyphonic, complex cognitive enterprise which includes both original uses of language and sophisticated patterns of moral reflection. (...)
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  45. Danto's Comic Vision: Philosophical Method and Literary Style.Noel Carroll - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):554-563.
    Arthur Danto numbers among the few contemporary philosophers whose writing is really a pleasure to read. Although rarely recognized, the source of that pleasure is Danto’s humor. His philosophical writing is consistently comic. Of course, the humor is obviously not of the knee-slapping variety. Yet it is pervasively playful.Danto will introduce a thought experiment and then explore it in several directions. Unlike many other contemporary philosophers, he is not stingy in laying out his examples. Whereas it is customary for most (...)
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  46. The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature.Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.) - 2015 - Routledge.
    _The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature_ is an in-depth examination of literature through a philosophical lens, written by distinguished figures across the major divisions of philosophy. Its 40 newly-commissioned essays are divided into six sections: historical foundations what is literature? aesthetics & appreciation meaning & interpretation metaphysics & epistemology ethics & political theory _The Companion_ opens with a comprehensive historical overview of the philosophy of literature, including chapters on the study’s ancient origins up to the 18 th -20 th (...)
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  47. Beauvoir and Rand: Asphyxiating People, Having Sex, and Pursuing a Career.Marc Champagne & Mimi Reisel Gladstein - 2015 - The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 15 (1):23-41.
    In an attempt to start rectifying a lamentable disparity in scholarship, we evince fruitful points of similarity and difference in the ideas of Simone de Beauvoir and Ayn Rand, paying particular attention to their views on long-term projects. Endorsing what might be called an “Ethic of Resolve,” Rand praises those who undertake sustained goal-directed actions such as careers. Beauvoir, however, endorses an “Ethic of Ambiguity” that makes her more skeptical about the prospects of carrying out lifelong projects without deluding oneself. (...)
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  48. Narrative and Essayistic Temporalities.E. Di Bona - 2015 - In Ch Wampole S. Ercolino (ed.), Narration and Reflection, Special Issue of Compar(a)ison: An International Journal of Comparative Literature. Peter Lang. pp. 49-62.
    The issues of this essay concern whether there are ways of experiencing time that are specific to narration and whether such ways can also be applied to the experience of time in reflection. In order to tackle these issues, we shall compare and contrast the experience of time in life with both the temporal experiences of narration and the temporal experiences of reflection. We shall begin, then, with a discussion on what the “experience of time” is, in the attempt of (...)
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  49. The Generalization of Holocaust Denial: Meyer Levin, William James, and the Broadway Production of The Diary of Anne Frank.James Duban - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1A):234-248.
    In his essay “Pragmatism and Humanism,” William James recalls a friend’s disappointment that the “prodigious star-group” known as the Big Dipper “should remind us Americans of nothing but a culinary utensil.”1 Such, presumably, is the fault of generalization, though James himself is less than specific in illustrating the occasional parity of varied perspectives. For example, he posits two identical equilateral triangles, one inverted and overlapping the other, and notes, “You can treat the adjoined figure as a star, as two big (...)
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  50. The Literary Essay and the ESL Student: A Case Study. Gaskins - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (2):99.
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