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Elizabeth Sweeny Block [4]Elizabeth Block [4]
  1.  4
    A Call to Action: Global Moral Crises and the Inadequacy of Inherited Approaches to Conscience.Elizabeth Sweeny Block - 2017 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 37 (2):79-96.
    This essay considers whether the model of conscience operative in Christian ethics, what I call the “reflexive conscience,” is adequate to meet the global moral challenges we face today, problems such as gun violence, climate change, and the Zika virus. Drawing primarily on the work of Willis Jenkins, I argue that conscience has not yet caught up to the scale and interconnectedness of our global moral challenges. A truly “engaged conscience” must be focused not primarily on the self but on (...)
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    Witness of the Body: The Past, Present, and Future of Christian Martyrdom Ed. By Michael L. Budde and Karen Scott.Elizabeth Sweeny Block - 2013 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 33 (1):211-212.
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    White Privilege and the Erroneous Conscience.Elizabeth Sweeny Block - 2019 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 39 (2):357-374.
    This paper considers the problems that unconscious racial bias and social sin more broadly pose for moral theology’s concepts of the erroneous conscience and ignorance. It argues that systemic racism prompts us to reimagine the erroneous conscience and individual culpability for ignorance. I argue that the erroneous conscience is useful in protecting human dignity in the face of error and in acknowledging the many ways we err but also problematic because it equates error with concrete action and conscious decisions and (...)
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    Water Shaping Stone: Faith, Relationships, and Conscience Formation by Kathryn Lilla Cox.Elizabeth Sweeny Block - 2017 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 37 (2):200-201.
    This essay considers whether the model of conscience operative in Christian ethics, what I call the “reflexive conscience,” is adequate to meet the global moral challenges we face today, problems such as gun violence, climate change, and the Zika virus. Drawing primarily on the work of Willis Jenkins, I argue that conscience has not yet caught up to the scale and interconnectedness of our global moral challenges. A truly “engaged conscience” must be focused not primarily on the self but on (...)
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