13 found
Order:
  1.  17
    Timing is everything: Dance aesthetics depend on the complexity of movement kinematics.Andrea Orlandi, Emily S. Cross & Guido Orgs - 2020 - Cognition 205 (C):104446.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  22
    Decreased reward value of biological motion among individuals with autistic traits.Elin H. Williams & Emily S. Cross - 2018 - Cognition 171 (C):1-9.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  29
    The impact of sensorimotor experience on affective evaluation of dance.Louise P. Kirsch, Kim A. Drommelschmidt & Emily S. Cross - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  4.  12
    Dissociating embodiment and emotional reactivity in motor responses to artworks.Alessandra Finisguerra, Luca F. Ticini, Louise P. Kirsch, Emily S. Cross, Sonja A. Kotz & Cosimo Urgesi - 2021 - Cognition 212 (C):104663.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  26
    Autonomous social robots are real in the mind's eye of many.Nathan Caruana & Emily S. Cross - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e26.
    Clark and Fischer's dismissal of extant human–robot interaction research approaches limits opportunities to understand major variables shaping people's engagement with social robots. Instead, this endeavour categorically requires multidisciplinary approaches. We refute the assumption that people cannot (correctly or incorrectly) represent robots as autonomous social agents. This contradicts available empirical evidence, and will become increasingly tenuous as robot automation improves.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  23
    Dancing robots: Social interactions are performed, not depicted.Guido Orgs & Emily S. Cross - 2023 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 46:e40.
    Clark and Fischer's depiction hypothesis is based on examples of western mimetic art. Yet social robots do not depict social interactions, but instead perform them. Similarly, dance and performance art do not rely on depiction. Kinematics and expressivity are better predictors of dance aesthetics and of effective social interactions. In this way, social robots are more like dancers than actors.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  9
    Fluid intelligence and working memory support dissociable aspects of learning by physical but not observational practice.Dace Apšvalka, Emily S. Cross & Richard Ramsey - 2019 - Cognition 190:170-183.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  15
    No evidence for enhanced likeability and social motivation towards robots after synchrony experience.Anna Henschel & Emily S. Cross - 2020 - Interaction Studies 21 (1):7-23.
    A wealth of social psychology studies suggests that moving in synchrony with another person can positively influence their likeability and prosocial behavior towards them. Recently, human-robot interaction researchers have started to develop real-time, adaptive synchronous movement algorithms for social robots. However, little is known how socially beneficial synchronous movements with a robot actually are. We predicted that moving in synchrony with a robot would improve its likeability and participants’ social motivation towards the robot, as measured by the number of questions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  12
    People’s dispositional cooperative tendencies towards robots are unaffected by robots’ negative emotional displays in prisoner’s dilemma games.Te-Yi Hsieh & Emily S. Cross - 2022 - Cognition and Emotion 36 (5):995-1019.
    The study explores the impact of robots’ emotional displays on people’s tendency to cooperate with a robot opponent in prisoner’s dilemma games. Participants played iterated prisoner’s dilemma games with a non-expressive robot (as a measure of cooperative baseline), followed by an angry, and a sad robot, in turn. Based on the Emotion as Social Information model, we expected participants with higher cooperative predispositions to cooperate less when a robot displayed anger, and cooperate more when the robot displayed sadness. Contrarily, according (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  41
    There or not there? A multidisciplinary review and research agenda on the impact of transparent barriers on human perception, action, and social behavior.Gesine Marquardt, Emily S. Cross, Alexandra Allison De Sousa, Eve Edelstein, Alessandro Farne, Marcin Leszczynski, Miles Patterson & Susanne Quadflieg - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6:130087.
    Through advances in production and treatment technologies, transparent glass has become an increasingly versatile material and a global hallmark of modern architecture. In the shape of invisible barriers, it defines spaces while simultaneously shaping their lighting, noise, and climate conditions. Despite these unique architectural qualities, little is known regarding the human experience with glass barriers. Is a material that has been described as being simultaneously there and not there from an architectural perspective, actually there and/or not there from perceptual, behavioral, (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  28
    Testing key predictions of the associative account of mirror neurons in humans using multivariate pattern analysis.Nikolaas N. Oosterhof, Alison J. Wiggett & Emily S. Cross - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):213-215.
    Cook et al. overstate the evidence supporting their associative account of mirror neurons in humans: most studies do not address a key property, action-specificity that generalizes across the visual and motor domains. Multivariate pattern analysis of neuroimaging data can address this concern, and we illustrate how MVPA can be used to test key predictions of their account.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  5
    Human body motion captures visual attention and elicits pupillary dilation.Elin H. Williams, Fil Cristino & Emily S. Cross - 2019 - Cognition 193 (C):104029.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Neuroaesthetics and beyond: new horizons in applying the science of the brain to the art of dance. [REVIEW]Emily S. Cross & Luca F. Ticini - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):5-16.
    Throughout history, dance has maintained a critical presence across all human cultures, defying barriers of class, race, and status. How dance has synergistically co-evolved with humans has fueled a rich debate on the function of art and the essence of aesthetic experience, engaging numerous artists, historians, philosophers, and scientists. While dance shares many features with other art forms, one attribute unique to dance is that it is most commonly expressed with the human body. Because of this, social scientists and neuroscientists (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations