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  1.  54
    The Influence of Stated Organizational Concern Upon Ethical Decision Making.Gene R. Laczniak & Edward J. Inderrieden - 1987 - Journal of Business Ethics 6 (4):297 - 307.
    This experimental study evaluated the influence of stated organizational concern for ethical conduct upon managerial behavior. Using an in-basket to house the manipulation, a sample of 113 MBA students with some managerial experience reacted to scenarios suggesting illegal conduct and others suggesting only unethical behavior. Stated organizational concern for ethical conduct was varied from none (control group) to several other situations which included a high treatment consisting of a Code of Ethics, an endorsement letter by the CEO and specific sanctions (...)
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  2. Fostering Ethical Marketing Decisions.Gene R. Laczniak & Patrick E. Murphy - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (4):259 - 271.
    This paper begins by examining several potentially unethical recent marketing practices. Since most marketing managers face ethical dilemmas during their careers, it is essential to study the moral consequences of these decisions. A typology of ways that managers might confront ethical issues is proposed. The significant organizational, personal and societal costs emanting from unethical behavior are also discussed. Both relatively simple frameworks and more comprehensive models for evaluating ethical decisions in marketing are summarized. Finally, the fact that organizational commitment to (...)
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  3. Marketing, Consumers and Technology: Perspectives for Enhancing Ethical Transactions.Gene R. Laczniak & Patrick E. Murphy - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (3):313-322.
    Abstract: The advance of technology has influenced marketing in a number of ways that have ethical implications. Growth in use of the Internet and e-commerce has placed electronic “cookies,” spyware, spam, RFIDs, and data mining at the forefront of the ethical debate. Some marketers have minimized the significance of these trends. This overview paper examines these issues and introduces the two articles that follow. It is hoped that these entries will further the important “marketing and technology” ethical debate.
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  4.  49
    “Just” Markets From the Perspective of Catholic Social Teaching.Nicholas J. C. Santos & Gene R. Laczniak - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S1):29-38.
    The "justice of markets" is intricately connected to the treatment of the poor and the disadvantaged in market economies. The increased interest of multinational corporations in low-income market segments affords, on one hand, the opportunity for a more inclusive capitalism, and on the other, the threat of greater exploitation of poor and disadvantaged consumers. This article traces the contributions of Catholic Social Teaching and its basic principles toward providing insight into what constitutes "justice" in such "marketing to the impoverished" situations.
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  5.  11
    Marketing, Consumers and Technology: Perspectives for Enhancing Ethical Transactions.Gene R. Laczniak & Patrick E. Murphy - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (3):313-321.
    The advance of technology has influenced marketing in a number of ways that have ethical implications. Growth in use of the Internetand e-commerce has placed electronic “cookies,” spyware, spam, RFIDs, and data mining at the forefront of the ethical debate. Some marketers have minimized the significance of these trends. This overview paper examines these issues and introduces the two articles that follow. It is hoped that these entries will further the important “marketing and technology” ethical debate.
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  6.  23
    The “Integrative Justice Model” as Transformative Justice for Base-of-the-Pyramid Marketing.Tina M. Facca-Miess, Gene R. Laczniak & Nicholas J. C. Santos - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (4):697-707.
    Writing in the Business and Politics, Santos and Laczniak 2012) formulated a normative, ethical approach to be followed when marketers e ngage impoverished market segments. It is labeled the integrative justice model. As noted below, that approach called for authentic engagement, co-creation, and customer interest representation, among other elements, when transacting with vulnerable market segments. Basically, the IJM derived certain operational virtues, implied by moral philosophy, to be used when marketing to the poor. But this well-intentioned approach raises a significant (...)
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  7.  23
    A Theological Context of Work From the Catholic Social Encyclical Tradition.Michael Naughton & Gene R. Laczniak - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (12):981 - 994.
    This article draws upon 100 years of writings which are referred to as the Catholic Social Tradition (CST). Using this tradition as a guide, the nature of work is explored along with the principles and virtues which vitalize the deepest dimension of work — how it affects the dignity of the human person. It develops five operational ethical principles which can be applied to questions of workplace ethics. Organizational policies and programs that seem consistent with CST are also discussed.
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  8.  11
    Implications of Caritas in Veritate for Marketing and Business Ethics.Thomas A. Klein & Gene R. Laczniak - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (4):641-651.
    In an effort to assess the latest thinking in the Roman Catholic Church on economic matters, we examine the newest encyclical by Pope Benedict XVI, Caritas in Veritate (Charity in Truth) for guidance concerning marketing and business strategy. Core ethical values, consistent with historical Catholic Social Teachings (CST), are retained. However, some important nuances are added to previous treatments, and, reflecting the mind of the current Pontiff, certain points of emphasis are shifted to account for recent global developments. Key areas (...)
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  9.  26
    The “Integrative Justice Model” as Transformative Justice for Base-of-the-Pyramid Marketing.Nicholas Jc Santos, Gene R. Laczniak & Tina M. Facca-Miess - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (4):1-11.
    Writing in the Business and Politics, Santos and Laczniak (Business and Politics 14(1) 2012) formulated a normative, ethical approach to be followed when marketers e ngage impoverished market segments. It is labeled the integrative justice model (IJM). As noted below, that approach called for authentic engagement, co-creation, and customer interest representation, among other elements, when transacting with vulnerable market segments. Basically, the IJM derived certain operational virtues, implied by moral philosophy, to be used when marketing to the poor. But this (...)
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  10.  20
    Ethics Education: Three Issues for Further DiscussionEthical Marketing Decisions: The Higher Road.James Weber, Gene R. Laczniak & Patrick E. Murphy - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (4):895.
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