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  1.  16
    Prenatal Screening: An Ethical Agenda for the Near Future.Antina de Jong & Guido M. W. R. de Wert - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (1):46-55.
    Prenatal screening for foetal abnormalities such as Down's syndrome differs from other forms of population screening in that the usual aim of achieving health gains through treatment or prevention does not seem to apply. This type of screening leads to no other options but the choice between continuing or terminating the pregnancy and can only be morally justified if its aim is to provide meaningful options for reproductive choice to pregnant women and their partners. However, this aim should not be (...)
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  2.  20
    The New Genetics and Informed Consent: Differentiating Choice to Preserve Autonomy.Eline M. Bunnik, Antina de Jong, Niels Nijsingh & Guido M. W. R. de Wert - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (6):348-355.
    The advent of new genetic and genomic technologies may cause friction with the principle of respect for autonomy and demands a rethinking of traditional interpretations of the concept of informed consent. Technologies such as whole‐genome sequencing and micro‐array based analysis enable genome‐wide testing for many heterogeneous abnormalities and predispositions simultaneously. This may challenge the feasibility of providing adequate pre‐test information and achieving autonomous decision‐making. At a symposium held at the 11th World Congress of Bioethics in June 2012 (Rotterdam), organized by (...)
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  3.  15
    Potentiality switches and epistemic uncertainty: the Argument from Potential in times of human embryo-like structures.Ana M. Pereira Daoud, Wybo J. Dondorp, Annelien L. Bredenoord & Guido M. W. R. De Wert - 2024 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 27 (1):37-48.
    Recent advancements in developmental biology enable the creation of embryo-like structures from human stem cells, which we refer to as human embryo-like structures (hELS). These structures provide promising tools to complement—and perhaps ultimately replace—the use of human embryos in clinical and fundamental research. But what if these hELS—when further improved—also have a claim to moral status? What would that imply for their research use? In this paper, we explore these questions in relation to the traditional answer as to why human (...)
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  4.  16
    In The Netherlands, Tolerance and Debate.Maurice A. M. de Wachter & Guido M. W. R. de Wert - 1987 - Hastings Center Report 17 (3):15.
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  5.  11
    The Role of Religion in the Political Debate on Embryo Research in the Netherlands.Wybo J. Dondorp & Guido M. W. R. de Wert - 2019 - In Mirjam Weiberg-Salzmann & Ulrich Willems (eds.), Religion and Biopolitics. Springer Verlag. pp. 257-279.
    Until the late twentieth century, there were three main political currents in the Netherlands: Christian, Labor, and Liberal, giving Christian party politics a stronger position than in European countries with a binary division between conservative and progressive. The history of the debate about embryo research coincides with the end of this period. Whereas in the 1980s the Christian Democrat party still had strong religiously motivated views about embryo protection, it has since lost both the power and the drive to pursue (...)
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