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  1.  19
    Telling the Truth About Power? Journalism Discourses and the Facilitation of Inequality.Henry Silke, Fergal Quinn & Maria Rieder - 2019 - Critical Discourse Studies 16 (3):241-247.
    The issue of socio-economic inequality has after many decades of benign neglect, in both the academy and journalism, become an increasingly important question. The economic crisis, beginning in 2007/2008 and followed by years of austerity has exasperated class and regional division. There have been numerous socio-economic and political outcomes from this; not least the Brexit vote in the UK and the election of Donald Trump, both unimaginable a decade ago. The role of journalism and the wider media in the production (...)
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  2.  13
    Denying, Downplaying, Debating: Defensive Discourses of Inequality in the Debate on Piketty.Andrea Grisold & Henry Silke - 2019 - Critical Discourse Studies 16 (3):264-281.
    ABSTRACTA clear sign of the heightened interest in economic inequality was the surprise popularity of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the twenty-first century. The book reached the top of the bestseller lists and was described as a ‘media sensation’ and Piketty himself as a ‘rockstar economist’. Piketty’s key thesis stated that the return on investment will be higher than economic growth, meaning that inequality is destined to worsen and that the post-war Keynesian period of progress, in terms of a flattening of (...)
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  3.  13
    Narrowing the Discourse? Growing Precarity in Freelance Journalism and its Effect on the Construction of News Discourse.Kathryn Hayes & Henry Silke - 2019 - Critical Discourse Studies 16 (3):363-379.
    ABSTRACTAs the number of freelance journalists increases, the changing nature of work in journalism has effects and possible implications for the kinds of news discourses that are circulated. This paper explores the experiences of freelance journalists in the Republic of Ireland in the context of increasing casualised work. We consider whether challenging working conditions impacts the type of journalism work carried out by freelancers and by extension influences the construction of news and wider discourse. Following the constructionist school, this paper (...)
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