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  1.  35
    On the Algebraizability of Annotated Logics.Renato A. Lewin, Irene F. Mikenberg & María G. Schwarze - 1997 - Studia Logica 59 (3):359-386.
    Annotated logics were introduced by V.S. Subrahmanian as logical foundations for computer programming. One of the difficulties of these systems from the logical point of view is that they are not structural, i.e., their consequence relations are not closed under substitutions. In this paper we give systems of annotated logics that are equivalent to those of Subrahmanian in the sense that everything provable in one type of system has a translation that is provable in the other. Moreover these new systems (...)
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  2.  9
    Literal‐Paraconsistent and Literal‐Paracomplete Matrices.Renato A. Lewin & Irene F. Mikenberg - 2006 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 52 (5):478-493.
    We introduce a family of matrices that define logics in which paraconsistency and/or paracompleteness occurs only at the level of literals, that is, formulas that are propositional letters or their iterated negations. We give a sound and complete axiomatization for the logic defined by the class of all these matrices, we give conditions for the maximality of these logics and we study in detail several relevant examples.
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  3.  64
    P1 Algebras.Renato A. Lewin, Irene F. Mikenberg & Maria G. Schwarze - 1994 - Studia Logica 53 (1):21 - 28.
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  4.  15
    First Order Theory for Literal‐Paraconsistent and Literal‐Paracomplete Matrices.Renato A. Lewin & Irene F. Mikenberg - 2010 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 56 (4):425-433.
    In this paper a first order theory for the logics defined through literal paraconsistent-paracomplete matrices is developed. These logics are intended to model situations in which the ground level information may be contradictory or incomplete, but it is treated within a classical framework. This means that literal formulas, i.e. atomic formulas and their iterated negations, may behave poorly specially regarding their negations, but more complex formulas, i.e. formulas that include a binary connective are well behaved. This situation may and does (...)
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