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  1.  28
    An Early Tibetan Commentary on Atiśa’s Satyadvayāvatāra. [REVIEW]James B. Apple - 2013 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (3):263-329.
    Dīpaṃkaraśrījñāna (982–1054 c.e.), more commonly known under his honorific title of Atiśa, is a renowned figure in Tibetan Buddhist cultural memory. He is famous for coming to Tibet and revitalizing Buddhism there during the early eleventh century. Of the many works that Atiśa composed, translated, and brought to Tibet one of the most well-known was his “Entry to the Two Realities” (Satyadvayāvatāra). Recent scholarship has provided translations and Tibetan editions of this work, including Lindtner’s English translation (1981) and Ejima’s Japanese (...)
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  2.  17
    An Early Bka’-Gdams-Pa Madhyamaka Work Attributed to Atiśa Dīpaṃkaraśrījñāna.James B. Apple - 2016 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 44 (4):619-725.
    Although Atiśa is famous for his journey to Tibet and his teaching there, his teachings of Madhyamaka are not extensively commented upon in the works of known and extant indigenous Tibetan scholars. Atiśa’s Madhyamaka thought, if even discussed, is minimally acknowledged in recent modern scholarly overviews or sourcebooks on Indian Buddhist thought. The following annotated translation provides a late eleventh century Indo-Tibetan Madhyamaka teaching on the two realities attributed to Atiśa Dīpaṃkaraśrījñāna entitled A General Explanation of, and Framework for Understanding, (...)
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  3.  16
    Khu Lo Tsā Ba’s Treatise: Distinguishing the Svātantrika/*Prāsaṅgika Difference in Early Twelfth Century Tibet.James B. Apple - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (5):935-981.
    The teachings of Madhyamaka have been the basis of Tibetan Buddhist thought and practice since the eighth century. After the twelfth century, Tibetan scholars distinguished two branches of Madhyamaka: Autonomist and Consequentialist. What distinctions in Madhyamaka thought and practice did twelfth century Tibetan scholars make to differentiate these two branches? This article focuses upon a newly identified twelfth century Tibetan manuscript on Madhyamaka from the Collected Works of the Kadampas: Khu lo tsā ba’s Treatise. Khu lo tsā ba, also known (...)
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  4.  17
    The Phrase Dharmaparyāyo Hastagato in Mahāyāna Buddhist Literature: Rethinking the Cult of the Book in Middle Period Indian Mahāyāna Buddhism.James B. Apple - 2014 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 134 (1):25.
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  5.  25
    An Early Tibetan Commentary on Atiśa’s Satyadvayāvatāra: Diplomatic Edition with Introduction and Notes. [REVIEW]James B. Apple - 2013 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (5):501-533.
    An earlier article (Apple, J Indian Philos 41(3): 263–329, 2013) identified for the first time a brief Tibetan commentary to Atiśa Dīpaṃkaraśrījñāna’s (982–1054 c.e.) well-known “Entry to the Two Realities” (Satyadvayāvatāra) and provided an annotated translation of the work. This article provides an annotated diplomatic edition of the Tibetan commentary. The manuscript of the commentary is a facsimile reprint located in the recently published “Collected Works of the Bka’-gdams-pas” (bka’ gdams gsung ’bum). The early Tibetan commentary to Atiśa’s Satyadvayāvatāra provides (...)
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  6. Redescribing Mandalas: A Test Case in Bodh Gaya, India.James B. Apple - 2008 - In Jonathan Z. Smith, Willi Braun & Russell T. McCutcheon (eds.), Introducing Religion: Essays in Honor of Jonathan Z. Smith. Equinox. pp. 40.
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