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Jan Waszink [12]Jan Hendrik Waszink [5]
  1.  9
    Lipsius and Grotius: Tacitism.Jan Waszink - 2013 - History of European Ideas 39 (2):151-168.
    Summary This article focuses on the Tacitist thought shared by Justus Lipsius and Hugo Grotius. Contrary to what his later works might suggest, in the years before the Dutch political crisis of 1618, Grotius appears willing to look at history and contemporary politics in terms of the Tacitist and reason-of-state-based categories defined in Lipsius's political works. A specific Lipsian inspiration seems present in Grotius's Amsterdam address of 1616, and his analysis of the early Dutch Revolt in the Annales et Historiae (...)
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  2.  14
    Your Tacitism or Mine? Modern and Early-Modern Conceptions of Tacitus and Tacitism.Jan Waszink - 2010 - History of European Ideas 36 (4):375-385.
    The purpose of this article is to show, by the example of Hugo Grotius's Annales et Historiae de rebus Belgicis , that the nature and content of the concept of Tacitism in the period around 1600 was markedly different from modern perceptions of the style and political purport of Tacitus's works. This gap between current and early-modern conceptions of Tacitus is important to bear in mind for intellectual historians dealing with early-modern intellectual currents such as Reason of State, Neo-Stoicism, Tacitism, (...)
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  3.  2
    Hugo Grotius on the Agglomerate Polity of Philip II.Jan Waszink - 2020 - History of European Ideas 46 (3):276-291.
    ABSTRACTThe aim of this article is to look at an early 17th-century analysis of a prince’s management of an ‘agglomerate polity’ in order to obtain a view of its chief focuses, concerns, and terms of analysis. Four main types of issues appear : 1. Acceptation and legitimacy of a prince who was perceived to ignore local customs, rights and interests of his various territories; 2. The king’s representatives and intermediaries, their management of their task, or the King’s management of them; (...)
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  4.  7
    Introduction.Jan Waszink - 2008 - Grotiana 29 (1):73-76.
  5.  7
    The Praelium Nuportanum by Isaac Dorislaus: Anglo–Dutch Relations and Strategic Historiography.Jan Waszink - 2016 - History of European Ideas 42 (8):1005-1026.
    SUMMARYThis article investigates the Anglo–Dutch scholar and diplomat Isaac Dorislaus's sole published work, Praelium Nuportanum, on the battle of Newport in 1600. After presenting some new or little known information about the work, it discusses PN's intellectual context and concludes that the work is a reminder of successful Anglo–Dutch cooperation in the past, of Dutch indebtedness to English assistance, and the Republic's importance as an ally for England, all relevant to the negotiations running in 1640 for an Orange–Stuart wedding, and (...)
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  6.  14
    Using the Work. Remarks on the Text of De Iure Praedae.Jan Waszink - 2007 - Grotiana 26 (1):215-245.
    This paper aims at showing that all scholars writing on De iure praedae should refer to the extant manuscript of the work, or to the new electronic edition when it becomes available, to check the passages they use in their arguments. The printed text as edited by Hamaker, though generally reliable as a nineteenth-century edition, must now be considered outdated because of its suppression of all previous stages of the text, as well as its replacement of the original punctuation with (...)
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  7. I-1 Ordinis Primi Tomus Primus: Antibarbarorum Liber.Kazimierz Kumaniecki, R. A. B. Mynors, Christopher Robinson & Jan Hendrik Waszink (eds.) - 1969 - Brill.
    The first volume of the first Ordo of the Amsterdam edition of the Latin texts of Erasmus contains a general introduction, and presents Erasmus’ attack on barbarious Latin, a commentary on Ovidius’ poem Nux , as well as Erasmus’ Latin translations of Euripides’ Hecuba and Iphigenia , declamations of Libanius, and works by Lucianus and Galenus.
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  8. Oldenbarnevelt and Fishes. Satirical Prints From the 12-Years Truce.Jan Waszink - 2020 - History of European Ideas 46 (7):903-915.
    ABSTRACT This paper discusses the intended argument and conceptual backgrounds of two satirical engravings published during the Truce Conflicts in the Dutch Republic, with a special focus on the use of fish imagery and its political implications. The case under consideration shows a now historic perception of fishes employed for disparaging purposes in the context of a deeply polarised society over issues of religious orthodoxy and toleration.
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  9.  12
    Henry Savile's Tacitus and the English Role on the Continent: Leicester, Hotman, Lipsius.Jan Waszink - 2016 - History of European Ideas 42 (3):303-319.
    SUMMARYThis article argues that Henry Savile's widely admired Tacitus of 1591 should not be read as an implied call for a more aggressive English stance against Spanish advances on the Continent, but precisely for a more restrained and prudential approach. Secondly, it calls into question the generally accepted view that Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, played a prominent role in the composition of the book. It argues that in reconstructing the work's original intellectual context and especially that of the supplement (...)
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  10.  10
    Shifting Tacitisms. Style and Composition in Grotius's Annales.Jan Waszink - 2008 - Grotiana 29 (1):85-132.
    The purpose of this article is to assess the nature and proper context of Grotius's imitation of Tacitus. It starts by establishing how the Tacitean style is characterised in the literary criticism around 1600. It then explores the qualities of Grotius's imitation from both the seventeenth-century and the modern perspective. It concludes that Grotius's imitation shows Tacitus's style in a characteristically seventeenth-century mirror, in that it emphasises Tacitean syntax, brevity and choice of words , as well as political edge and (...)
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  11.  5
    New Documents on the Prohibition of Grotius’ Annales Et Historiae by the Roman Index.Jan Waszink - 2003 - Grotia 24 (1):77-137.
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  12.  2
    Hugo Grotius, A Lifelong Struggle for Peace in Church and State, 1583–1645.Jan Waszink - forthcoming - History of European Ideas:1-3.
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  13.  1
    Hugo Grotius, A Lifelong Struggle for Peace in Church and State, 1583–1645: By H. J. M. Nellen. Translated From the Dutch by J. C. Grayson, Leiden/Boston, Brill, 2015, 827 Pp., ISBN 978-90-04-27436-5 (Hardback) and 978-90-04-28179-0 (E-Book); Plus 130 Illustrations, Partly in Colour. [REVIEW]Jan Waszink - 2020 - History of European Ideas 46 (2):209-211.
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